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> Best Way To Practice Scales
Ignite
post May 1 2009, 01:41 AM
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There are so many scale positions it's scaring me. So I understand every scale has a formula, would it be efficient to learn the formula and play the notes based off of that, or memorizing each pattern and play that from your head. See I tend to freak out over what is most efficient for my mind. I'm trying to memorize the formula for lets say a Minor Pentatonic scale, but my mind doesn't really go that fast to remember every note so it takes me forever to play the scale based off the formula instead of the pattern, but there are so many patterns I won't be able to memorize them all.

Any ideas? huh.gif

--edit--
and if a formula is better, which is a better way to memorize: off a forumla like 1 2 3 5 6 or off half and whole steps? I hope this makes since, not sure how to describe it that well.

This post has been edited by Ignite: May 1 2009, 01:43 AM


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UncleSkillet
post May 1 2009, 02:04 AM
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Hi Ignite,

It really isn’t as overwhelming as you may think. I am an ear trained visual learner. I can remember the shapes and how they connect when I play and hear them. Maybe you can try this also because I can relate to your post. Hope it helps some.

A blues player will usually play in the pentatonic shapes (boxes or whatever you want to call them). This style or scale set has 5 boxes or position on the neck that fit. Learn them in 1 key (the shapes) and you no how to jam in any key. You just need to learn this in one key (for example (A minor), how to connect the boxes and then your good to go!

Same thing with 3nps scales for the most part. Forget about modes for now! Once you learn all 7 positions of a major or minor scale in one key then you know them all and can play in most keys.

I am being very general here but I hope this helps to get you off to a good start and see things different.

Cheers smile.gif


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ZakkWylde
post May 1 2009, 02:10 AM
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I don't know much theory or formulas, I just go for the patterns!

Take the minor pentatonic in a for example: I learn the first box, play it up and down and with some exercises - then I add the next box of the pattern and play that one until i momorized it. Now that I know two patterns close to each other I play with those two (up down, left right, exercises) until I know the two boxes in relation. I'll continue to do that with boxes 3,4 and 5 until I got the whole pattern memorized because after the fifth box it starts with the first box again.

Now that I only memorized the position of the notes and not their formula I am free to move the pattern into any key I like by starting the first box on a diffrent fret (first box played from the 5th fret on the low e string= a minor/c major - first box played from the 12 fret on the low e= e minor/g major) and so on...

I learned the pentatonic, major/minor scales and the harmonic minor scale like this!


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JVM
post May 1 2009, 02:11 AM
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The way I would suggest doing it is to learn the boxes playing them up and down, and the associated chords that correspond to the boxes. Read andrew's lesson on CAGED. It's also a great ability to be able to move up a single string with the scale. In the end, you don't want to think about any of it and just play, which takes some time, but you do get there smile.gif

So, to combine these ideas, some very good exercises that have helped me a lot are:

-Playing the scales up and down, but either accenting or playing twice on the root notes. It is very important to learn where they are. This method really helped me to learn their locations. You can take this down a more advanced route and play the scale boxes up and down and every time you get to a root note, you continue up, down, then back up that particular string in the scale (or just up, down, then return to the root if you want), then continue on with the box.

-Play the associated chord for the box, then the box itself (using any variations above that you like) and then end with playing the root chord of the scale.

-Not exactly related to scales, but a great exercise is taking a note, particularly helpful if you are focusing on a single key or scale, and play that note and all of it's octaves on the fretboard, string by string. Do this for frets 1-12 then repeat on the upper frets 12-whatever you've got.

-Going up and down the scale in particular intervals, like thirds (great exercise, as it will help you greatly understanding chords)

This post has been edited by JVM: May 1 2009, 02:12 AM


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Ramiro Delforte
post May 1 2009, 05:23 AM
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Here I leave you some steps that I think are the best way to learn scales:

1- Learn first C major scale
2- Not only learn the shapes, learn the notes
3- For the purpose to learn the notes say the note name and sing the pitch while you're playing the scale
4- After you've memorized and understood all 7 positions combine them so you won't see them as individualities
5- Spend some time improvizing on the scale
6- After you've done that you pass on that same thing on other scale like F and G
7- Once you've mastered all 12 keys then go to some other scales and repeat the same process.

I hope this helps biggrin.gif


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sted
post May 1 2009, 09:00 AM
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Hey pal,

Certainly every guitarist will learn the boxes first, next step is to try connecting them in a certain key, so try and play over a backing in the key of A using all the boxes, then start moving those positions about for different keys, you will learn which notes fit where pretty quickly. The key thing is always know where your root is relevant to the position youre in, this will help you remendously as if you get a bit excited and start going off scale you can always resolve back to the root.

Always learn the major and minor scales first mate, once you can play these you can play the minor and major pentatonics, add the flat 5th and you can play a blues scale, all the modes are built on these scales too so it gives you a great starting point.

hope this helps mate!

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kjutte
post May 1 2009, 09:01 AM
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QUOTE (Ignite @ May 1 2009, 02:41 AM) *
There are so many scale positions it's scaring me. So I understand every scale has a formula, would it be efficient to learn the formula and play the notes based off of that, or memorizing each pattern and play that from your head. See I tend to freak out over what is most efficient for my mind. I'm trying to memorize the formula for lets say a Minor Pentatonic scale, but my mind doesn't really go that fast to remember every note so it takes me forever to play the scale based off the formula instead of the pattern, but there are so many patterns I won't be able to memorize them all.

Any ideas? huh.gif

--edit--
and if a formula is better, which is a better way to memorize: off a forumla like 1 2 3 5 6 or off half and whole steps? I hope this makes since, not sure how to describe it that well.


To begin with, you'd most likely need to learn the patterns, unless you see notes and not frets on the neck.
Though, in the long run, if you are ambitious, you will ultimately think in notes.

So, learning formulaes, sharps and flats, etc- VERY important.
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Keilnoth
post May 1 2009, 09:46 AM
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QUOTE
-Play the associated chord for the box, then the box itself (using any variations above that you like) and then end with playing the root chord of the scale.


Mmmmh, chords associated to boxes ? smile.gif
Is that the harmonized chords or something like that ?
Is that a theory lesson ? Could you please give me a link ?


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playaxeman
post May 1 2009, 10:17 AM
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QUOTE (Keilnoth @ May 1 2009, 10:46 AM) *
Mmmmh, chords associated to boxes ? smile.gif
Is that the harmonized chords or something like that ?
Is that a theory lesson ? Could you please give me a link ?


Yes there is:

Andrew's theory lesson:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...?showtopic=3351

Here is the introduction on scales by Andrew:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...?showtopic=3967

This post has been edited by playaxeman: May 1 2009, 10:19 AM


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Oxac
post May 1 2009, 11:17 AM
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To be honest I think this is the best way.

Memorize the SOUND first. Sing them, learn to sing ionian, dorian etc., pentatonics and so on. Then learn to play them by shapes.

After that, learn different patterns in the shapes.

Then try to connect the shapes together. I good way to do this is to first learn the caged system, then the 3 notes per string. Because in the 3 notes per string you often go from one caged, play between 2 caged and end up in another smile.gif

Learn how to play the scales on one string, sliding them with every finger. Also try to learn different patterns there.

good luck smile.gif


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Pedja Simovic
post May 1 2009, 11:50 AM
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I somewhat agree to what Oxac is saying.
It is very essential to sing scales/modes/pentatonics. Singing will help you lock sound in your ears and also develop strong and weak melodic notes within specific scale !

So if you are just sitting there with metronome like a machine playing scales up and down you are not doing any good.
Sure, you can play some shred music where you can run scales up and down non stop, but to make music you need to LISTEN and to listen you need to OPEN YOUR EARS.


Good exercise that you can use is play a single note on your guitar, sing it , memorize it. Now sing from that note specific scale : Major for starters. You can then extend this exercise with singing the modes of major scales, then move to modes of Minor scales, pentatonic scales, arpeggios etc.
If you are beginner at this, you can first play a note then sing it back and sync your voice with sounding pitch. You should repeat this many times until you can do it from memory.


One other thing worth mentioning is you should start making music as soon as possible. Don't think that you have to learn whole fretboard to do that. If you take one major scale shape and memorize it, use it ! Put backing track on, and solo with it Sing some melody then play it back on your guitar. Take it step further - transcribe things that you sing and play. It will help you understand your rhythm patterns as well as melodic approach over certain harmonies.


Hope this was helpful smile.gif


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Muris Varajic
post May 1 2009, 02:30 PM
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I guess you're at early beginning so IMO
easiest way to start is by memorizing patterns/fingerings.
After a while you will naturally be more interested into whole
theory behind scales and you will learn formulas etc.
And along with memorizing patterns/fingerings you can
test yourself on knowing notes on the fretboard,
play some pattern,stop at one note and name it. smile.gif


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Jose Lassaga
post May 1 2009, 09:34 PM
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I agree with Pedja, try to sing each scale: firts star with diatonic scale(sing and try to remember each note). Then study the pentatonic scale, minor armonics and melodic, and blues scale. Don´t go nuts over this. Start slowly, with one scale and one position at the time. Play over everything you can: backingtracks, songs in the radio, music on television, each thing you listen!!! You will notice changes in a couples of weeks, only if you work hard every day and have patience!!! Good luck!!!
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Vasilije Vukmiro...
post May 1 2009, 10:37 PM
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You should practice scales:
1. All the way down the neck, covering all modes.
2. In one positions only.
3. With different patterns, like playing 3rds, 5ths, groups of 4 ect.


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djohnneay
post May 2 2009, 08:45 PM
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I think the basic idea given here is that you have to practice scales in as much diffrent ways as possible for optimal result.
Mayby the following will help you in doing this:

- Search for a scale YOU think sounds good (this can be any scale)
- Figure out the notes that are in that scale, then try to play it in one position
- Try singing the root note first, then the other notes.
- Once you got that, you could try singing the notes while playing at the same time
- When you succeed at that, try to make some small riffs, licks or chords out of it
- Look up some theory behind the scale and try to understand how it works
- Then search for other positions on the neck where you can play the same scale
- Look for diffrent manners and other ways to play the same scale, mayby just on one string, or while skipping strings

This process might take some time but it is definately worth it, just have some fun with the scales you know, and you knowledge will increase without you noticing it. Time shouldn't be seen as an enemy, but as a friend. Enjoy your time with the guitar wink.gif

Just remember that theory is just a tool that can help you build songs, and aren't strict rules. It is perfectly possible to write a good song with little knowledge if you know how to use it right.

I hope this will help you get somewhere wink.gif

This post has been edited by djohnneay: May 2 2009, 08:45 PM


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jdriver
post May 3 2009, 03:17 AM
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Make it easy on yourself and start with this lesson series by Ivan Milenkovic.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/solo-guit...ming-exercises/


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