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Silver Stratocas...
post May 7 2009, 05:19 PM
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Hey Ivan. I'm new here and thought I'd ask you seeing as you're the resident blues man ( I think ).
I'm trying to learn how to play the blues, and I know the basic chord progressions and scales, but what can I do to break out of the minor pentatonic scale? In your lessons, and other peoples' as well, you seem to always have a "fresh" sound, where as I find mine is a bit repetitive. I've read the Andrew Cockburn lesson on modes, so you can bring up those if they're relevant seeing as I now understand. Also, the lesson on different rythmic patterns was great.

Thanks,
Harrison.
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Ivan Milenkovic
post May 7 2009, 06:47 PM
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Thanks mate smile.gif

If you are having troubles breaking out of the pentatonic scale, than it is time to learn the major scale pattern over the neck the same way you learned the boxes. There are 2 most used ways to learn the major scale on the neck:

1. CAGED method
this method has 5 positions, similar to pentatonic positions, but with more notes.

2. 3 note per string patterns method
this method has 7 positions, and has 3 note per every string. It's very common way to learn the 7 positions of the major scale.

I've found both ways pretty good, and think that possibly second method has small advantage cause you train yourself to start from every note from the scale. 1st method only has 5 positions so this means you are starting from 5 notes, not 7 (number of notes within major scale). What is good about 1st method is possibly smaller learning curve, cause you can learn faster all 5 positions if you know pentatonic scale already. Major scale practically has all the notes that are within the major pentatonic scale, with 2 more notes added. If you just use the patterns from pentatonic scale and add those notes within the patterns, it can be easier than to learn 7 new positions.

Either way, you have to learn the major scale pattern over the neck. This is crucial for further development. If you want I can produce a small GP file with those positions so you understand the patterns?

Let me know if you have any more questions, I'll be glad to help! smile.gif


cheers


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Silver Stratocas...
post May 7 2009, 08:53 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ May 7 2009, 12:47 PM) *
Thanks mate smile.gif

If you are having troubles breaking out of the pentatonic scale, than it is time to learn the major scale pattern over the neck the same way you learned the boxes. There are 2 most used ways to learn the major scale on the neck:

1. CAGED method
this method has 5 positions, similar to pentatonic positions, but with more notes.

2. 3 note per string patterns method
this method has 7 positions, and has 3 note per every string. It's very common way to learn the 7 positions of the major scale.

I've found both ways pretty good, and think that possibly second method has small advantage cause you train yourself to start from every note from the scale. 1st method only has 5 positions so this means you are starting from 5 notes, not 7 (number of notes within major scale). What is good about 1st method is possibly smaller learning curve, cause you can learn faster all 5 positions if you know pentatonic scale already. Major scale practically has all the notes that are within the major pentatonic scale, with 2 more notes added. If you just use the patterns from pentatonic scale and add those notes within the patterns, it can be easier than to learn 7 new positions.

Either way, you have to learn the major scale pattern over the neck. This is crucial for further development. If you want I can produce a small GP file with those positions so you understand the patterns?

Let me know if you have any more questions, I'll be glad to help! smile.gif


cheers


Is GP Guitar Pro? And if so, that'd would be great. biggrin.gif
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Ivan Milenkovic
post May 8 2009, 03:59 PM
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Of course mate, here you go! smile.gif

In this file you will find caged and 3nps patterns of the C major key. Don't worry you can use them for all other keys as well, they are always the same.

Also pay no attention to note values and red (unfinished) bars, and choose "Show Beat+Bar" view for the guitar fretboard view. This way while you are in the bar you will see the whole pattern.

Try to learn these patterns in parallel, for example you can combine in one same practice session pattern 1 of the CAGED system and pattern 1 of the 3nps system. This way you cover same positions, but go into slightly different directions which is very important later when you start using them.

These patterns take time to learn, they can be learned fast, but becoming realy comfortable in playing them and knowing them requiers some time, so keep doing them until you are comfortable and focus on that as a result. It will come after a while, just be patient.
Attached File(s)
Attached File  CAGED_and_3NPS_C_major_patterns.gp5 ( 4.42K ) Number of downloads: 67
 


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