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> Putting It All Together
Ignite
post May 26 2009, 04:08 AM
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I have learned a lot in the past 2 years or so of studying guitar (and music theory) but i'm stressing on putting it all together. I can improvise like no other on a scale or mode using the scale or mode and chord tone (Or arpegios or whatever it's called) and well, im just starting to look at other people's solos (like in songs and stuff) and it seems to me they are using mostly the same techniques I am only on a larger scale, like playing modes up and down the neck only together, something I can not do. So my question is, if I learn scales/modes all up and down the neck, will I learn different types of licks? Because usually when I improvise, I tend to play the same thing over and over again or I usually end up doing so. When writing solo's, do you play over the whole neck on a scale/mode while using arpegios or is each solo unique?


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Santiago Diaz Ga...
post May 26 2009, 05:00 AM
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Firstly, you can start using different rythmics patterns. Try to not play always the same note. Play with triplets, change from 8th notes to 16th notes every 3 notes, etc. There's a lot of things you can do. This will give you some versatility and air to the solo.
Melodically, let's take an example. Let's use Am scale and take Cm, D and E chords. Now, let's figure out the arpeggio. Once you have all the arpeggios figured out, mix them not only playing the whole arpeggio. Maybe playing half of each of them, or a few notes, and apply the rhythmics advices I gave you. You'll note that you will have almost all the fretboard covered and with a lot of versatility.
Any doubt, you just have to ask


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maharzan
post May 26 2009, 06:40 AM
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This is something that I would also like to know. I can't improvise yet. I am still learning the scales. smile.gif I can however compose (taking some time). From what I know, you have to play different note at different speeds. slow and melodic and fast riffs in between. and if you can it sounds best if you move across the fret and move around different scales. such as E major with E Lydian thing. I will look forward to what masters have to say!

This post has been edited by maharzan: May 26 2009, 06:41 AM


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Azzaboi
post May 26 2009, 07:48 AM
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Scales helped me a lot with riffs and licks, improving soloing. It's what they are all based around and if you can slowly build up and get some clean speed though a few scales, you have a huge range of guitar soloing and can easily make up your own. You can jump between scales, even on an off beat or play the same scale at different positions on the neck.

Most licks normally start and end on the same note key. Take the notes of a scale that fits to a certain chord progression and just play with those notes. Adjusting the duration of the note, the technique applied (such as hammering, bending, vibrato or sliding) and speeding up or slowing down the tempo, to fit the song. Try to rely on technique, timing, patterns, moments of silence, and repetition to develop a pleasant solo.

This post has been edited by Azzaboi: May 26 2009, 07:56 AM


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Pedja Simovic
post May 26 2009, 11:45 AM
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Its time to start using your ears smile.gif
It may sound funny but this is really the best answer and secret I can give you right now. If you know your scales, modes, arpeggios, perhaps you can learn some theory and harmony to back that knowledge up ?
Most importantly transcribe music that you love. Transcribe instruments other than guitar ! That will really expand your ear and you will not sound like every single guitar player playing same licks. Transcribe everything you listen, it will make you understand how licks and lines are created.
Let me know if you have any questions !


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Ignite
post May 26 2009, 07:50 PM
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Well whenever I play anything by ear i'm always worried i'll be playing something that isn't part of a scale or mode or something that won't make sense in theory. Should I be worried about that?


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Dexxter
post May 26 2009, 07:54 PM
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QUOTE (Ignite @ May 26 2009, 08:50 PM) *
Well whenever I play anything by ear i'm always worried i'll be playing something that isn't part of a scale or mode or something that won't make sense in theory. Should I be worried about that?


If it sounds good to your ear it can't be wrong smile.gif
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Pedja Simovic
post May 26 2009, 10:15 PM
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QUOTE (Ignite @ May 26 2009, 08:50 PM) *
Well whenever I play anything by ear i'm always worried i'll be playing something that isn't part of a scale or mode or something that won't make sense in theory. Should I be worried about that?


Yes and No smile.gif

If your ear is somewhat trained (ex you are not tone deaf smile.gif, then it will tell you which notes are good to rest on and which should be avoided.

This is where knowledge of theory and harmony comes into play. If you have A minor chord in the backing track, and you play notes A C and E, they sound really strong. If you play note F it sounds weird and odd - this is avoid note. You can use it but use it to resolve to one of the pleasant notes (chord tones A C E or available tensions). etc


Study theory and harmony, work on your ear training and all the knowledge of instrument will click together very soon.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post May 27 2009, 11:00 AM
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QUOTE (Ignite @ May 26 2009, 05:08 AM) *
I have learned a lot in the past 2 years or so of studying guitar (and music theory) but i'm stressing on putting it all together. I can improvise like no other on a scale or mode using the scale or mode and chord tone (Or arpegios or whatever it's called) and well, im just starting to look at other people's solos (like in songs and stuff) and it seems to me they are using mostly the same techniques I am only on a larger scale, like playing modes up and down the neck only together, something I can not do. So my question is, if I learn scales/modes all up and down the neck, will I learn different types of licks? Because usually when I improvise, I tend to play the same thing over and over again or I usually end up doing so. When writing solo's, do you play over the whole neck on a scale/mode while using arpegios or is each solo unique?


Don't be stressed out man, it's a natural path to progress. You may have learned to play modes and scales, but you have to learn the chords within the scales, learn more licks, become super-comfortable about the diatonic pattern (where the notes are), and just try to improvise so you land on strong notes within the chord. Being a good improviser requires you to be very familiar with theory basics like scales, chords, arpeggio shapes, note durations etc. Check out some theory lessons and try to apply it to you current techniques that you rehearsed, and in some time it will click all together. Try to use several note durations when practicing, and you will see that after a while your soloing will become more rhythmically enhanced. Try to learn the chords, and you will see that your soloing will become more melodically enhanced. People often underestimate these things in the beginning and don't find them very useful, but it's basically what you need.


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