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> Logic 8 Recording In Stereo
Fingerspasm
post Jun 16 2009, 01:11 PM
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I have just recently purchased a Macbook pro and an Apogee Ensemble Audio Interface. This is my first time recording with a mic instead of direct. When I try to record in stereo it wants my to use mic input 1 and 2 on my interface. If I only use input 1 or input 2 I only get half the stereo signal. Is there a way to record stereo with only one mic. I have only recorded direct in the past with my Stealthplug or my GNX4 and they would create a stereo track that I could pan left or right with just the click of a button. But I have not been able to find this option so far in Logic 8. Of course I have read the manual a little bit (its very thick. 1029 pages!) But so far I have not found this option.


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wrk
post Jun 16 2009, 01:47 PM
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QUOTE (Fingerspasm @ Jun 16 2009, 02:11 PM) *
I have just recently purchased a Macbook pro and an Apogee Ensemble Audio Interface. This is my first time recording with a mic instead of direct. When I try to record in stereo it wants my to use mic input 1 and 2 on my interface. If I only use input 1 or input 2 I only get half the stereo signal. Is there a way to record stereo with only one mic. I have only recorded direct in the past with my Stealthplug or my GNX4 and they would create a stereo track that I could pan left or right with just the click of a button. But I have not been able to find this option so far in Logic 8. Of course I have read the manual a little bit (its very thick. 1029 pages!) But so far I have not found this option.

In case you don't use any kind of stereo mic, there is no sense to record a stereo track with only one mic(?). A mono track can be paned to left and right as well.

I guess the option you are looking for is in the Logic mixer. You seem to use a stereo track to record a mono signal . Click on the button with the circle (on circle mono, two circles stereo)
[attachment=16221:Picture_1.png]

Hope this helps, otherwise let me know .. smile.gif



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Fingerspasm
post Jun 16 2009, 01:55 PM
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QUOTE (wrk @ Jun 16 2009, 06:47 AM) *
In case you don't use any kind of stereo mic, there is no sense to record a stereo track with only one mic(?). A mono track can be paned to left and right as well.

I guess the option you are looking for is in the Logic mixer. You seem to use a stereo track to record a mono signal . Click on the button with the circle (on circle mono, two circles stereo)
[attachment=16221:Picture_1.png]

Hope this helps, otherwise let me know .. smile.gif


I had the same thought process about recording in Mono and duplicating the tracks and panning one left and one right. But when I did this both tracks were nice and loud at full strength all the way right but when I panned left they were barely audible. I will have to check a few things I guess and make sure I have my settings right. It could actually be my monitors or my speaker cable...... I think I did have a problem once before with my speaker cable doing this. I will check and see. Thanks for the advice.


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Emir Hot
post Jun 16 2009, 01:57 PM
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I agree. No point recording stereo track. If you need powerful riffs then you have to record 2 separate takes played the same and pan those.


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wrk
post Jun 16 2009, 02:04 PM
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I think its quite normal if you pan one track to one side only the overall volume seems to go down. I experiment with Emir's advise as well lately. Not easy to play riffs completely synchrony to each other, but it sounds way more powerful.

btw .. you seem to have an awesome soundcard. I use the Apogee Duet and it's great, but the Ensemble is a dream i suppose smile.gif



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Emir Hot
post Jun 16 2009, 02:16 PM
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QUOTE (wrk @ Jun 16 2009, 02:04 PM) *
Not easy to play riffs completely synchrony to each other, but it sounds way more powerful.


They don't need to be 100% the same but they must sound tight


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Fingerspasm
post Jun 16 2009, 02:22 PM
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QUOTE (Emir Hot @ Jun 16 2009, 06:57 AM) *
I agree. No point recording stereo track. If you need powerful riffs then you have to record 2 separate takes played the same and pan those.


I will give this a try. Thanks!


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Jun 16 2009, 02:27 PM
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QUOTE (Fingerspasm @ Jun 16 2009, 12:55 PM) *
I had the same thought process about recording in Mono and duplicating the tracks and panning one left and one right. But when I did this both tracks were nice and loud at full strength all the way right but when I panned left they were barely audible. ...


Check how your sequencer is set up regarding panning law. Generally panning law will be set in the sequencer to attenuate the gain down by about 3dB at centre. Perhaps yours is set up in preferences to attenuate at full left?

WRT recording in stereo - for recording with mics you can either use a matched pair to achieve the same sound to both channels or you could deliberately use two different types of mic to allow you to then take the best from each. So for instance you could use a dynamic mic like a Shure SM57/8 set close to the guitar amp's speaker that can tolerate high spl but will not produce a flat response and has limited frequency range. You could then use a condenser mic set a few feet away to get more room ambience, reflection etc. If the condenser clips you cut in the dynamic (cf stem recording). If it doesn't you mix the two as you wish. This is used a lot for recording vocals as well.

Some amps lend themselves to stereo recording - Roland Jazz Choruses are one. Mono recording the chorus just loses a lot of the ambiance and space. Here you may want to stereo record by placing a mic up close to each of the speakers and pan them left and right. Also many effects - particularly pro rack effects output to stereo. In that sort of situation it is common to record to stereo.


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Fingerspasm
post Jun 16 2009, 02:34 PM
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QUOTE (wrk @ Jun 16 2009, 07:04 AM) *
I think its quite normal if you pan one track to one side only the overall volume seems to go down. I experiment with Emir's advise as well lately. Not easy to play riffs completely synchrony to each other, but it sounds way more powerful.

btw .. you seem to have an awesome soundcard. I use the Apogee Duet and it's great, but the Ensemble is a dream i suppose smile.gif


I figured out my problem..... When I was moving my equipment around to get mic's plugged in to the interface etc. I also moved my monitors. They have individual volume controls on the back and I must have hit the one on the right speaker because it was turned down from where I had it set to match the left. I did not think to check the obvious since I am dealing with so many new things. New Software, New computer and new interface I was kind of overwhelmed. But now I seem to slowly be figuring out some of my problems. blink.gif
Yes the Ensemble is great. I am very happy with it. The Preamps sound great!


QUOTE (Emir Hot @ Jun 16 2009, 07:16 AM) *
They don't need to be 100% the same but they must sound tight


I agree about it sounding tight. The band I recorded is my son's metalcore band and they are ages 14 through 17. So I am having to preach this to them. They did not even know what I was talking about when I asked them what tempo they played the song at! huh.gif So we got that figured out and we have been making progress ever since then. After hearing their new recorded song for a little over a week now they can hear some of the mistakes and realize that they need to tighten it up a bit.


QUOTE (tonymiro @ Jun 16 2009, 07:27 AM) *
Check how your sequencer is set up regarding panning law. Generally panning law will be set in the sequencer to attenuate the gain down by about 3dB at centre. Perhaps yours is set up in preferences to attenuate at full left?

WRT recording in stereo - for recording with mics you can either use a matched pair to achieve the same sound to both channels or you could deliberately use two different types of mic to allow you to then take the best from each. So for instance you could use a dynamic mic like a Shure SM57/8 set close to the guitar amp's speaker that can tolerate high spl but will not produce a flat response and has limited frequency range. You could then use a condenser mic set a few feet away to get more room ambience, reflection etc. If the condenser clips you cut in the dynamic (cf stem recording). If it doesn't you mix the two as you wish. This is used a lot for recording vocals as well.

Some amps lend themselves to stereo recording - Roland Jazz Choruses are one. Mono recording the chorus just loses a lot of the ambiance and space. Here you may want to stereo record by placing a mic up close to each of the speakers and pan them left and right. Also many effects - particularly pro rack effects output to stereo. In that sort of situation it is common to record to stereo.


My problem ended up being something pretty simple. I posted the solution just a second ago on my reply to wrk. Thanks for taking the time to try and help. Your input has some very useful info that might help me in my next recording session. I had been thinking about using a one of my condenser mic's out in the middle of the room to record on a separate track and then see how that sounded mixed with the guitar track that was recorded with the mic right up against the cabinet. Thanks again for the input!!! smile.gif

This post has been edited by Fingerspasm: Jun 16 2009, 02:38 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jun 17 2009, 11:54 AM
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Condenser mic experimenting sounds interesting, just make sure the room is not filled with lots of flutter echo/reverberation cause it you cannot remove it in the mix.


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