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> Question About Chords In Chord Progressions, chords like minor dominant or major 6 7, 9, #9; b9; 11;#11; 13,b13ths
stevie ray hey h...
post Jun 27 2009, 11:06 PM
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HI

I was wondering if there are standards or mathematical rules about this:

I know for example a IV chord leads to a V or a vii° chord . But if you use chords like #9 or even 7b9#11 , can those chords have specificic influences on the chord progression or are they always just filling up the chord and that's it.

joris, just wondering.



does anyone know interisting lessons or websites about chord progression theory and added notes-chords?

thanx



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Emir Hot
post Jun 28 2009, 01:10 AM
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QUOTE (stevie ray hey hey hey @ Jun 27 2009, 11:06 PM) *
HI

I was wondering if there are standards or mathematical rules about this:


Neither standard nor mathematical.

You can alter or extend any dominant chord with as many extensions as you need in your music. Doesn't really matter what you use as long as you are happy. Most of those altered chords fit with superlocrian scale. Some really heavy jazz uses this type of non stop alteration but you don't need to have them always. When you build the tension or the quality of the chord then you decide what sounds good. For example you can have G7 but you can extend it to G13 and it will still sound mixolydian. But if you have G9b13 this is now something that only you should know whether you like it smile.gif You can still treat that chord as your mixolydian base in your progresion (usualy V chord), but with this alteration. You could play Mixolydian b6 in this case.


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Muris Varajic
post Jun 28 2009, 01:37 AM
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Agree with Emir, it's pretty much what you're trying to get from that very chord.
Just be aware, some of those extended chords are not alterated at all,
they are just extended so they fit your scale/key nicely.
On the other hand some ARE altered, per example +9,
it's used in specific situations but once again, suit it to yourself. smile.gif


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Frederik
post Jun 28 2009, 02:02 AM
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when do u want to alter a chord?
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Emir Hot
post Jun 28 2009, 02:20 AM
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QUOTE (Frederik @ Jun 28 2009, 02:02 AM) *
when do u want to alter a chord?


When you think it sounds cool to you smile.gif Jazz guys alter non-stop and that's why their progressions sound the way they sound.


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Muris Varajic
post Jun 28 2009, 02:33 AM
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QUOTE (Emir Hot @ Jun 28 2009, 03:20 AM) *
When you think it sounds cool to you smile.gif Jazz guys alter non-stop and that's why their progressions sound the way they sound.


Bro, are you online???
Don't know what is happening,
recently I can't see your online icon flashing,
maybe you turned it off or som?


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Emir Hot
post Jun 28 2009, 02:44 AM
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QUOTE (Muris Varajic @ Jun 28 2009, 02:33 AM) *
Bro, are you online???
Don't know what is happening,
recently I can't see your online icon flashing,
maybe you turned it off or som?


I am online but going to bed smile.gif Never turned anything off. All working good here


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Pedja Simovic
post Jun 30 2009, 07:09 PM
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QUOTE (stevie ray hey hey hey @ Jun 28 2009, 12:06 AM) *
HI

I was wondering if there are standards or mathematical rules about this:

I know for example a IV chord leads to a V or a vii° chord . But if you use chords like #9 or even 7b9#11 , can those chords have specificic influences on the chord progression or are they always just filling up the chord and that's it.

joris, just wondering.



does anyone know interisting lessons or websites about chord progression theory and added notes-chords?

thanx


You are wondering about good things ! smile.gif

First of all, IV chord doesn't have to lead to V or VII chord. IV to V in major scale is whole step away, and step wise motion (movement) sounds always strong! You can move IV anywhere you want as long as you know how to find your way in and out - if that makes any sense ? smile.gif

Regarding alterations on chords... If you just follow specific rules, you will see that in major scale Dominant 7th chord on V scale degree has natural 9th, perfect 11th and major 13th. In other words in key of C, G is on 5th scale degree so you would get this G791113 as all possible tensions. Here is where things get cool smile.gif Now you, as performer/composer/improviser/harmonic accompainist can choose what you want to add or change in those tensions. This is especially true in Jazz music. What happens if you have Ab in your melody as passing note? Well you can now have G7b9 chord since Ab is b9 compared to G. That note doesn't belong to C major scale but as passing note or approach pattern it is perfectly fine. Another good example I can give you is - you don't even need to have those notes played by somebody. As harmonic type player (accompainist) you can color the harmony any way you want. So that gives you freedom to put over G7 any sort of tension you like. G7b9, G7#9, G79, G7sus11 , G7b5(#11), G7#5(b13) G713 or just G13, or even any combination you want to use ! This is why dominant chords are one great open area that really do a lot in harmony and music overall. Without dominant chords there is no tension, and without tension there is no resolution !!!
Imagine music with just one straight line? Thats music without tension and release in it smile.gif

Anyways, I hope this helps you somewhat. I have couple of lessons with chords that should help you with theory explanations. I just published new lesson today with jazz chords and you might definitely find it useful with these questions you have smile.gif

Let me know if you need anything, thanks.


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Ramiro Delforte
post Jun 30 2009, 09:01 PM
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QUOTE (stevie ray hey hey hey @ Jun 27 2009, 11:06 PM) *
HI

I was wondering if there are standards or mathematical rules about this:

I know for example a IV chord leads to a V or a vii° chord . But if you use chords like #9 or even 7b9#11 , can those chords have specificic influences on the chord progression or are they always just filling up the chord and that's it.

joris, just wondering.



does anyone know interisting lessons or websites about chord progression theory and added notes-chords?

thanx


The whole EXOTIC SCALE series (not the solo/application lessons) are full of chords with tensions on them. You can check them out.
https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/instructor/Ramiro-Delforte

I hope it will help you smile.gif


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