Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Lemon Extract?
sigma7
post Aug 19 2009, 01:06 AM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.310
Joined: 17-April 08
From: Rhode Island USA
Member No.: 4.917



Hey everybody! biggrin.gif . Well, ive decided to scallop my entire fretboard. I hear you need a light touch to play a scalloped neck so I thought it would teach me to relax my wrist a little more haha. My question is can you use lemon extract instead of just lemon oil to clean the fretboard? Lemon extract ingredients are water, alcohol, and lemon oil. Does anyone have any experience with lemon extract...and/or scalloping?

Thanks
Alex biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Toroso
post Aug 19 2009, 01:23 AM
Post #2


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 653
Joined: 26-August 08
From: Kingston, TN USA
Member No.: 5.779



I use lemon oil on my furniture, lemon extract in my cake and lemon juice on my scallops. tongue.gif


--------------------
Live well, and live often!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Santiago Diaz Ga...
post Aug 19 2009, 09:07 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 1.769
Joined: 28-April 09
From: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Member No.: 7.117



Victor's right. What I recommend you, is to not leave the normal fretboard once you start to play with the scaloped one. I know a lot of people that only played with scaloped guitars and now they can't play with normal ones, because they get so used to the scaloped that they aren't able to play with the normal ones.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
MickeM
post Aug 19 2009, 09:37 AM
Post #4


Born of NWOBHM, Moderation Team Leader
*

Group: Members
Posts: 8.562
Joined: 9-January 07
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Member No.: 1.062



I wouldn't use anything with alcohol in it, I don't know but I suspect that can dry and bleech the wood.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Emir Hot
post Aug 19 2009, 10:04 AM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 7.201
Joined: 14-July 08
From: London UK
Member No.: 5.490



QUOTE (sigma7 @ Aug 19 2009, 01:06 AM) *
Hey everybody! biggrin.gif . Well, ive decided to scallop my entire fretboard. I hear you need a light touch to play a scalloped neck so I thought it would teach me to relax my wrist a little more haha.


I heard opposite. People that have scalloped fretboard claim that you need to control your playing much more. I tried a couple of times and realized it's not for me.


--------------------
Check out my <a href="https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/instructor/Emir-Hot" target="_blank">Instructor profile</a>

www.emirhot.com
www.myspace.com/emirhotguitar
www.myspace.com/sevdahmetal
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sensible Jones
post Aug 19 2009, 11:31 AM
Post #6


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.549
Joined: 2-January 09
From: London-ish. UK.
Member No.: 6.517



QUOTE (sigma7 @ Aug 19 2009, 01:06 AM) *
My question is can you use lemon extract instead of just lemon oil to clean the fretboard? Lemon extract ingredients are water, alcohol, and lemon oil.

Thanks
Alex biggrin.gif

Basically NO!!!
Lemon Extract will dry out your fingerboard due to it's small alcohol + water content.
Lemon Oil is widely used for cleaning and moisturising fingerboards! (And Furniture.)
Remember that Lemon Oil is NO GOOD for Maple Fingerboards!!!!

This post has been edited by Sensible Jones: Aug 19 2009, 11:31 AM


--------------------
I'd rather have a full Bottle in front of me than a full Frontal Lobotomy!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sollesnes
post Aug 19 2009, 04:01 PM
Post #7


Learning Tone Master
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.940
Joined: 18-January 09
Member No.: 6.623



QUOTE (Sensible Jones @ Aug 19 2009, 12:31 PM) *
Remember that Lemon Oil is NO GOOD for Maple Fingerboards!!!!


I've heard that it can work as a one-time procedure, like "finishing" the neck after scalloping it. Or am I wrong here?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sigma7
post Aug 19 2009, 05:43 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.310
Joined: 17-April 08
From: Rhode Island USA
Member No.: 4.917



QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Aug 19 2009, 10:01 AM) *
I've heard that it can work as a one-time procedure, like "finishing" the neck after scalloping it. Or am I wrong here?


idk, thats what i heard, but i dont have the oil, i have extract...o well, i guess ill use wood finisher or something

QUOTE (Emir Hot @ Aug 19 2009, 04:04 AM) *
I heard opposite. People that have scalloped fretboard claim that you need to control your playing much more. I tried a couple of times and realized it's not for me.


Yah, i tried it a little bit at guitar center last week and I liked it, it was kind of relearning the guitar again. And thats exactly what I need to break my habits, and wut the hey, if Yngwie can do it, so can I smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sensible Jones
post Aug 19 2009, 06:16 PM
Post #9


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.549
Joined: 2-January 09
From: London-ish. UK.
Member No.: 6.517



QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Aug 19 2009, 04:01 PM) *
I've heard that it can work as a one-time procedure, like "finishing" the neck after scalloping it. Or am I wrong here?

QUOTE (sigma7 @ Aug 19 2009, 05:43 PM) *
idk, thats what i heard, but i dont have the oil, i have extract...o well, i guess ill use wood finisher or something

Yah, i tried it a little bit at guitar center last week and I liked it, it was kind of relearning the guitar again. And thats exactly what I need to break my habits, and wut the hey, if Yngwie can do it, so can I smile.gif

It will work as a treatment after scalloping, but ONLY on Rosewood/Ebony Fingerboards. It can also be used as a cleaning agent to remove Finger Grease and Dirt build up. It can be used as a Cleaner whenever you want to!
It should only be used on harder Woods though, If you use it on Maple it will end up damaging the fingerboard!
There are other Oils available to treat a scalloped Maple Fingerboard!!
biggrin.gif biggrin.gif


This is what you want, but definitely NOT Lemon EXTRACT!!!
biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Sensible Jones: Aug 19 2009, 06:22 PM


--------------------
I'd rather have a full Bottle in front of me than a full Frontal Lobotomy!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sollesnes
post Aug 25 2009, 09:23 AM
Post #10


Learning Tone Master
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.940
Joined: 18-January 09
Member No.: 6.623



[quote name='Sensible Jones' date='Aug 19 2009, 07:16 PM' post='413832']
It should only be used on harder Woods though, If you use it on Maple it will end up damaging the fingerboard!
/quote]

Now, I don't really know much about it, but are you sure its not just damaging for the clear coat finish on some maple fretboards? Googling it now, and it seems fairly "common" to use lemon oil to finish newly scalloped maple necks?
As I said, I don't really know anything about it, but...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sensible Jones
post Aug 25 2009, 12:36 PM
Post #11


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.549
Joined: 2-January 09
From: London-ish. UK.
Member No.: 6.517



QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Aug 25 2009, 09:23 AM) *
QUOTE (Sensible Jones @ Aug 19 2009, 07:16 PM) *

It should only be used on harder Woods though, If you use it on Maple it will end up damaging the fingerboard!


Now, I don't really know much about it, but are you sure its not just damaging for the clear coat finish on some maple fretboards? Googling it now, and it seems fairly "common" to use lemon oil to finish newly scalloped maple necks?
As I said, I don't really know anything about it, but...

All I can tell you is what I've always been told (by Jimmy Page's Guitar Tech).
He always used it only on Rosewwod/Ebony boards and never on Maple ones!
Although, on the bottles of Kyser/Dr Stringfellows it doesn't say NOT to use it on maple, but on the bottles of Dunlop it has a warning about NOT using it on Maple boards!



Fretboard cleaner and conditioner

Jim Dunlop Fretboard 65 Ultimate Lemon Oil for cleaning fingerboards.

Introducing Fretboard 65 Ultimate Lemon Oil, the latest addition to Dunlop's world-famous line of guitar care products and the logical evolution of the 01 Fingerboard Cleaner and 02 Fingerboard Deep Conditioner. Fretboard 65 is specially formulated to clean away grime and return your guitars fretboard to its original luster, quickly and easily. Apply a thin coating using Dunlop spray applicator top, work the gunk free, and wipe clean. Its that simple. And once the dirt is gone, Fretboard 65 will help keep it away by providing an invisible sealant against stains and moisture. Player tested, tech approved Fretboard 65 Ultimate Lemon Oil will clean up the mess that the music business leaves behind.

Product Details:

* Quick and easy to use
* Keep your fretboard looking and feeling new
* Works on rosewood fingerboards
* NB this size of product is only 1 Fluid Oz

For a newly scalloped Maple Board I personally would use either Tung Oil, Mineral Oil or Linseed Oil.
If using Linseed Oil remember to dispose of any Rags you use outside as it can spontaneously combust!!
Linseed is the same Oil they use to treat Cricket Bats!
biggrin.gif biggrin.gif

Just found this info:-
1. Linseed oil is more like a varnish than an oil. Because it forms a continuous film, it seals the surface of the wood like a varnish, but oils of plant origin may later slowly penetrate down to the wood. It can take years. It comes in many forms. The stuff from a hardware or art store is a paint variety, boiled or raw. Both of them stink. If you insist on Linseed oil, get the food grade from a health food store. This grade doesn't smell so bad. After multiple applications, nothing can penetrate it. If you use Linseed oil, take any rags or brushes that are used and dispose of them outdoors. When left in a pile of rags, this stuff can spontaneously burst into flame. You then lose both your ax and your home. Squeeze the bottle and screw the cap on tight, minimizing any air space in the container.

2. Tung oil is also a varnish that forms a continuous film. When used for this purpose, a small amount is applied and rubbed with one's hand until the surface feels warm. The heat from friction "sets" (polymerizes) the varnish. This is where the term, "hand rubbed," comes from, not from skin oil. A hand has no lint and leaves no brush marks. A Tung oil finish can also be later penetrated by a light weight plant oil. It is a very slow process. The good news is that, over time, some of the varnish may wear off from finger and string pressure, facilitating better absorption of oil. Same with Linseed.

3. Shellac is also a varnish, but different from the two above. Linseed and Tung oils are film surfaces. They polymerize and are very difficult to penetrate. Shellac does not form a continuous film, so some oil can get through, at least more easily than Linseed or Tung. I have never heard of it being used on a fretboard, but who knows? It is not advised.

4. Mineral oil merely coats the surface, giving it a bright sheen, but does not penetrate the wood. This oil prevents absorption by a plant oil after the fact. This includes most bore oils, but not all. Read the label. Most so-called fretboard treatments and bore oils are no more than inexpensive mineral oil with a scent added, like lemon.

5. Silicone-based furniture polishes also make it shiny but prevent later penetration in the short term. Silicone also eventually migrates into the wood, integrating with the cellulose structure and breaking it down.

6. Polyurethane and Nitro finishes can't be penetrated...ever.

7. Skin or Nose oils contain dirt, skin fragments, salt, bacteria and God only knows what else. "Hand-rubbed" does not mean skin oil! It means Tung oil.

8. Petroleum based lubricants behave like mineral oil, don't penetrate the wood, and prevent future absorption. Most contain solvents that can potentially damage some adhesives.

9. Corn oil, Safflower oil, Olive oil, etc., do penetrate to some degree, but contain no preservatives. They may become rancid over time.

10. Lemon Oil, Almond oil, Walnut oil, etc., food grade, are probably O.K., but make sure they don't contain solvents like naphtha or other petroleum distillates. Solvents can weaken any adhesives used in instrument construction. Be aware that most "Lemon oils" are no more than lemon-scented mineral oil, as are most bore oils. Real lemon oil is quite acidic, with a pH of 3.7 to 4.2. It is an effective cleaner, but wipe it off when you are finished. Rosewood oil does not even come from the same plant that your fretboard wood came from, not even the same country! It is consists mostly of an aromatic solvent with a Rosewood oil scent added.

This post has been edited by Sensible Jones: Aug 25 2009, 01:20 PM


--------------------
I'd rather have a full Bottle in front of me than a full Frontal Lobotomy!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 17th October 2017 - 02:08 PM