Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Learning Modes And Major Scales From Scratch
iamblackmo
post Sep 14 2009, 02:28 PM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 235
Joined: 1-September 08
From: Tampa, Fl USA
Member No.: 5.818



I understand MOST of the theory behind major scales and harmonizing over a chord progression. I know boxes of several scales at different positions and I have an idea of how major scales are used to create chords and how we play over that chord position.

My problems;

I don't understand the interval system. I.E. I, II, III, IV V

I know these have to do with the degree of the scale. Which chords are major, minor, and the one diminished.

What is a good key to start memorizing? Should I memorize various chord shapes for that scale or mode? Should I stick with just one scale or should I learn the modal variations of it.

I want to be able to come up with a 2-3 chords progression and just solo over it.

It says that the intervals/formula for the major scale are 1,2,3,4,5,6,7.

I understand building the scale using the tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone semitone , root

I dont want to be a much better guitar player than I am now without understand the theory better. I want to be able to know what builds each chord from the major scale.

I know this may be confusing but pretty much all I know is that I can tell someone to play a D, C, G, or E chord and I know a few box shapes but I am not sure which ones they are. I know the D shape I know and use often is D Mixolydian and the E shape is a pentatonic.

So I can improvise a little bit but I just really would like to be able to understand one key, which is what I think you guys will suggest and be able to play over it or compose.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Muris Varajic
post Sep 14 2009, 02:33 PM
Post #2


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.459
Joined: 22-June 07
From: Sarajevo,Bosnia
Member No.: 2.159



I, II, III, IV etc are roman numbers used for degrees.
So, every diatonic scale like major and minor has those degrees.
But of course those degrees are not the same,
you have minor 3rd in minor scale while there's major 3rd in major scale etc.
Those numbers are used when you already know the scale/key and chords inside,
just for easier navigation.
Per example, in a key of Am, I - III - VII would be Am chord, C chord and G chord,
in key A major it would be A chord, C#m chord and G#dim chord.

You should focus more on formulas for each type of scale
to figure out how it's built and what type of chords are inside.
People often starts with Am and C major scales tho.
And those formulas will remain the same for same type of scale,
Am scale has the same formula as Cm scale or any other minor scale,
it's relation of semi tones on whole tones in a scale.


--------------------
Youtube
MySpace
Website



Album "Let It Out" on
iTunes
and CD Baby

Check out my video lessons and instructor board!

The Pianist
tune is progress,check it out!

"ok.. it is great.. :P

have you myspace? Can i to personalize this for you guy?"
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JVM
post Sep 14 2009, 03:48 PM
Post #3


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.878
Joined: 2-June 07
From: Raleigh-Durham, NC
Member No.: 1.984



If you want to expand your chords, try reading on CAGED. Also, for now, focus on open A, E, and D shaped (major and minor, and 7ths) barre chords. Work on them one at a time, what you need to do is figure out where the root note of each barre shape is at, then all you have to do with these chords is apply the scale formula to the root notes of the chord, move up the formula like you were doing a scale up a single string and switch from major, minor, minor, major, etc. Apply this with CAGED and soon you'll be able to see the entire scale all over the fretboard in chords if you want.


--------------------
Gear: Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster, Gibson '67 RI Flying V, Mesa Boogie F-30 112 combo, crazy pedals.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
iamblackmo
post Sep 14 2009, 07:19 PM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 235
Joined: 1-September 08
From: Tampa, Fl USA
Member No.: 5.818



QUOTE (Muris Varajic @ Sep 14 2009, 09:33 AM) *
I, II, III, IV etc are roman numbers used for degrees.
So, every diatonic scale like major and minor has those degrees.
But of course those degrees are not the same,
you have minor 3rd in minor scale while there's major 3rd in major scale etc.
Those numbers are used when you already know the scale/key and chords inside,
just for easier navigation.
Per example, in a key of Am, I - III - VII would be Am chord, C chord and G chord,
in key A major it would be A chord, C#m chord and G#dim chord.

You should focus more on formulas for each type of scale
to figure out how it's built and what type of chords are inside.
People often starts with Am and C major scales tho.
And those formulas will remain the same for same type of scale,
Am scale has the same formula as Cm scale or any other minor scale,
it's relation of semi tones on whole tones in a scale.

\
I use the site "all guitar chords" for my scale reference.

When I try to find Am, I can choose between harmonic minor, or acending and descending melodic minor?

Which do you refer to when you say Am
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pedja Simovic
post Sep 14 2009, 08:36 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 8.109
Joined: 13-September 08
From: Nis, Serbia
Member No.: 5.892



I recommend you check out THIS post. It should help a lot !


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 14 2009, 09:26 PM
Post #6


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 25.396
Joined: 20-November 07
From: Belgrade, Serbia
Member No.: 3.341



My problems;

QUOTE
I don't understand the interval system. I.E. I, II, III, IV V

I know these have to do with the degree of the scale. Which chords are major, minor, and the one diminished.

The first thing you should do is learn all the intervals nicely. Go to musictheory.net and go through interval lessons to really get familiar with them. I II III etc are roman numerals telling you what note in the scale you are using. Usually it's a major scale, so I suggest you start with that. Learn all the roman numerals, and the note names.

QUOTE
What is a good key to start memorizing? Should I memorize various chord shapes for that scale or mode? Should I stick with just one scale or should I learn the modal variations of it.

Stick with major scales first, and learn all the 7 modes that can be found in the major keys. Start from C major key for starters, learn the notes, distances between the notes (intervals), and the way modes are buidling chord progression within C major key (there are 7 modes, every scale builds one chord, so there are 7 chords within C major key)

QUOTE
I want to be able to come up with a 2-3 chords progression and just solo over it.

It says that the intervals/formula for the major scale are 1,2,3,4,5,6,7.

I understand building the scale using the tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone semitone , root

I dont want to be a much better guitar player than I am now without understand the theory better. I want to be able to know what builds each chord from the major scale.

I know this may be confusing but pretty much all I know is that I can tell someone to play a D, C, G, or E chord and I know a few box shapes but I am not sure which ones they are. I know the D shape I know and use often is D Mixolydian and the E shape is a pentatonic.

So I can improvise a little bit but I just really would like to be able to understand one key, which is what I think you guys will suggest and be able to play over it or compose.

The chords are made out of scales, any chord is made by taking root, third and fifth out of a scale.

Since you know that major scale has that interval layout, you can understand that every mode has it's own specific layout as well. So modes build different chords.

major chord triad is constructed out of: root, major third, perfect fifth
minor chord triad is constructed out of: root, minor third, perfect fifth
diminished chord triad is constructed out of: root, minor third, diminished (flat) fifth

You can find major chord triads in modes 1, 4, and 5 of the major scale (those would be modes that use the C major scale notes, but instead of C (I), have the root on F (IV) and G (V)

you can find minor chord triads in modes 2, 3, and 6 of the major scale (modes that use C major scale notes, but start on II, III and VI degree - E, D and A

and diminished chord on the 7th mode (locrian). For example VII note is B in C major key, so it builds diminished chord (check the interval layout and you will see that wholestep/halfstep intervals are constructing minor third and diminished fifth).







--------------------
- Ivan's Video Chat Lesson Notes HERE
- Check out my GMC Profile and Lessons
- (Please subscribe to my) YouTube Official Channel
- Let's be connected through ! Facebook! :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Muris Varajic
post Sep 15 2009, 12:35 AM
Post #7


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.459
Joined: 22-June 07
From: Sarajevo,Bosnia
Member No.: 2.159



QUOTE (iamblackmo @ Sep 14 2009, 08:19 PM) *
\
I use the site "all guitar chords" for my scale reference.

When I try to find Am, I can choose between harmonic minor, or acending and descending melodic minor?

Which do you refer to when you say Am


Yeah, melodic minor looks like natural minor when descending.
I mean natural Am tho.
And be aware that when you have song in a key of Am,
you can easily find both harmonic Am scale and melodic Am scale
since they have same "mother", natural Am scale. smile.gif


--------------------
Youtube
MySpace
Website



Album "Let It Out" on
iTunes
and CD Baby

Check out my video lessons and instructor board!

The Pianist
tune is progress,check it out!

"ok.. it is great.. :P

have you myspace? Can i to personalize this for you guy?"
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd July 2017 - 11:54 AM