Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Any Wwii History Fans In Here?, Anyone have relatives that took part in the war?
Praetorian
post Sep 21 2009, 08:30 PM
Post #1


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



Both of my grandfathers served in WWII. Both for the US. One was in the Army and he was in combat bomb disposal. If a bomb or mortar landed on the battlefield and didn't explode, his job was to run up to it with his toolbox and take it apart so it couldn't go off. He volunteered for this job! ohmy.gif Crazy eh?!

My other grandfather was in the Navy and served on PT556 a patrol torpedo boat in the Mediterranean. It was a small 80 foot boat made out of wood that was covered with guns and torpedoes. It was the fastest boat in the Navy. They would go full speed at enemy boats, launch torpedoes and turn away.

They both survived the war, and have some crazy stories! Does anyone in here have relatives that served on either side?


p.s. This is not a discussion for judgment or politics...merely for people like me who are history buffs!

This post has been edited by Praetorian: Sep 21 2009, 08:31 PM


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Artemus
post Sep 21 2009, 09:09 PM
Post #2


Learning Tone Seeker - CHALLENGE STAR!
*

Group: Members
Posts: 866
Joined: 6-February 09
From: Manchester, UK
Member No.: 6.743



Thanks for sharing the story of your grandparents. I'm always interested in stories of yester year.
My father served as a sailor in the Royal Navy during WWII, I remember him telling me lots of intriguing stories. I believe he served on HMS Arethusa and survived a torpedo attack.


--------------------
My Myspace site here
My YouTube channel here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
sted
post Sep 21 2009, 09:18 PM
Post #3


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.758
Joined: 13-April 08
From: Merseyside, UK
Member No.: 4.882



QUOTE (Artemus @ Sep 21 2009, 09:09 PM) *
Thanks for sharing the story of your grandparents. I'm always interested in stories of yester year.
My father served as a sailor in the Royal Navy during WWII, I remember him telling me lots of intriguing stories. I believe he served on HMS Arethusa and survived a torpedo attack.


Hey man! Long time no see! smile.gif

Yeah, my Grandad was a Navy leftenant in charge of a landing craft, he was the only one from his group who didnt get sent to the D-day landings, how weird was that? before he went in the Navy (He was only sixteen!) he was also a team leader at Vickers in barrow building the wellington bomber. He used to say his pay was 25 shillings a week, but his baord and lodge in Barrow was......25 shillings a week! laugh.gif He has some great stories of his time, but also some not so great ones, though he doesnt mind telling them, I think he's 87 now, its tragic to think that we will be the last generation to actually be able to speak to people who served in the 2nd WW before it passes into the history books.

Im a big fan of WW2 history and especially the birth ofthe commandos, SAS etc, its unfortunate that we owe a lot of todays technical advancements to what is learned during wartime, strange race us humans!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JVM
post Sep 21 2009, 09:28 PM
Post #4


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.878
Joined: 2-June 07
From: Raleigh-Durham, NC
Member No.: 1.984



My grandfather was a gunner in a bubble turret on a B-24 liberator. He had some good stories. Once, one of his buddies got hot flak up his rear end. Pap, as we called him, passed away a few years ago now. He was also director of one of the departments of the National Institute of Health, very accomplished guy, great person too smile.gif


--------------------
Gear: Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster, Gibson '67 RI Flying V, Mesa Boogie F-30 112 combo, crazy pedals.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jafomatic
post Sep 21 2009, 09:37 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.049
Joined: 6-May 09
From: Austin, TX
Member No.: 7.145



My father was too young to serve (by maybe 5 years or so, give or take a year of lying about his age) but my mother's parents worked at the Naval yard in Philadelphia. They didn't have any good stories.

My father's father, however, was a surgeon that volunteered to join a british field hospital unit during world war ONE(!) some time --if I remember correctly-- before the USA actually got involved. I never met him, but apparently he was a rather gruff sort of fellow. He lost a lung to the mustard gas during the war, and kept on smoking his chesterfields for another 30 years.

I personally met a couple of the men from the 101st airborne division (506th PIR, E company even!) that were still living before I left Philadelphia. Another old friend of the family served in the 82nd during WWII and he was quite a character. He was 87 the last time I saw him, yet the guy could pass for being in his late 60's. I didn't get much from him in the way of stories, I'm sorry to say.

Best thing to do for these, aside from reading the works of Stephen Ambrose, is to watch the history channel around anniversary dates (pearl harbor day, d-day, etc) and see if they're replaying all those hours of interviews they collected from veterans. So thankful that they were able to capture so much on video.



--------------------
::jafomatic


http://jafomatic.net/tunes/ <-- Here lies the master collection of my collaboration and other improvisation recordings.

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Praetorian
post Sep 21 2009, 09:55 PM
Post #6


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



QUOTE (Artemus @ Sep 21 2009, 04:09 PM) *
Thanks for sharing the story of your grandparents. I'm always interested in stories of yester year.
My father served as a sailor in the Royal Navy during WWII, I remember him telling me lots of intriguing stories. I believe he served on HMS Arethusa and survived a torpedo attack.



Here is your dad's ship!


Attached image(s)
Attached Image
 


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Skalde
post Sep 21 2009, 10:12 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 784
Joined: 13-January 08
From: Germany, North
Member No.: 3.817



My grandfather served for the german Army. He was trained to be a fighter pilot but never flew in combat, but fought in Africa and Russia where he escpaed from war captivity. He is still alive.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
superize
post Sep 21 2009, 10:13 PM
Post #8


Ultimate Tone Guru
Group Icon

Group: Student Instructor
Posts: 4.343
Joined: 26-July 07
From: Glommersträsk. Sweden
Member No.: 2.410



I dont know anyone who participated in the war but i was very interested to read about the war when i was in school.....Especially the war in Russia


--------------------
My Gear

Ibanez RG
Jackson js30 warrior
jackson rr24
Line 6 Spider III amp
Line 6 pod xt live
Washburn acoustic

Youtube Account
My bands Myspace


Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Praetorian
post Sep 21 2009, 10:21 PM
Post #9


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



QUOTE (Skalde @ Sep 21 2009, 05:12 PM) *
My grandfather served for the german Army. He was trained to be a fighter pilot but never flew in combat, but fought in Africa and Russia where he escpaed from war captivity. He is still alive.



Wow...that's great to hear! There aren't many of these men left with us. Skalde - if you are interested in reading a great book, check out "The Forgotten Soldier". It is a famous memoir written by a German soldier who fought on the Russian front. It was probably the most harsh fighting conditions any soldier in the war had to face. It will give you an idea of what your grandfather had to go through!


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bondy
post Sep 21 2009, 10:37 PM
Post #10


Learning Roadie
Group Icon

Group: GMC Wiki:er
Posts: 2.267
Joined: 27-September 07
From: Telford.Shropshire.England
Member No.: 2.884



My Grandfather was a navigator in the RAF he volunteered and lied about his age to get in. he flew in Lancaster Bombers and was shot down twice, he doesn't like to talk about it though as all of his friends died in the war.


--------------------
www.minorglance.com
www.facebook.com/minorglance
www.facbook.com/majorlookband
www.twiter.com/minorglance
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Saoirse O'Shea
post Sep 21 2009, 11:29 PM
Post #11


Moderator - low level high stakes
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.173
Joined: 27-June 07
From: Espania - Cadiz province
Member No.: 2.194



My mother's experience predates WWII a little as she experienced the Long March indirectly as a child in China back in the early 30s. Her and her family fled to Kowloon and Hong Kong and were there when it was invaded.
My paternal grandfather started as a warrant officer in the Irish Guard and ended the war as an officer. My father was too young for WWII but served in the British army through the Suez crisis and later elsewhere.

My wife's father and grandfather were navy and served mainly in the N Atlantic in WWII (cadet and rear admiral - her father, the one who was a cadet, went on to serve as a captain on HMY Britannia); her maternal grandfather was a major in the army in India, her great uncle a major and her uncle a major general.

Various members have military honours but again none of the family like to talk to talk about their war experiences.


--------------------
Get your music professionally mastered by anl AES registered Mastering Engineer. Contact me for Audio Mastering Services and Advice and visit our website www.miromastering.com

Be friends on facebook with us here.

We use professional, mastering grade hardware in our mastering studo. Our hardware includes:
Cranesong Avocet II Monitor Controller, Dangerous Music Liasion Insert Hardware Router, ATC SCM Pro Monitors, Lavry Black DA11, Prism Orpheus ADC/DAC, Gyratec Gyraf XIV Parallel Passive Mastering EQ, Great River MAQ 2NV Mastering EQ, Kush Clariphonic Parallel EQ Shelf, Maselec MLA-2 Mastering Compressor, API 2500 Mastering Compressor, Eventide Eclipse Reverb/Echo.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Praetorian
post Sep 22 2009, 12:08 AM
Post #12


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



Great to hear all this guys! Also, my wife's grandfather was in the Army and fought in the Battle of Anzio in Italy. He was severely wounded in the Invasion of Germany at Aachen. His son...my father in law...gave me the Purple Heart medal he was awarded for being wounded. My father in law knows how much of a history buff I am so he thought it should be with me. I was very honored for this.


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fkalich
post Sep 22 2009, 01:44 AM
Post #13


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.752
Joined: 12-February 07
From: People's Republic of Lawrence Kansas
Member No.: 1.189



QUOTE (Praetorian @ Sep 21 2009, 02:30 PM) *
p.s. This is not a discussion for judgment or politics...merely for people like me who are history buffs!


I don't know how you do that. I doubt there is anyone here that has read nearly the amount of scholarly WWII history I have. There could be someone, but I don't meet people often that have. But just about anything you say or write is going to be controversial. Primarily because mainstream history is so mythological.

I will say, you really can't take too seriously accounts and stories unless you can cross check them from several angles to validate them. They are probably at best only partially true, and probably leave out a lot of the context. Stories just change within days of the events, with few exceptions. People just don't tell the truth. Often they even start to believe stuff that you know cannot be possibly true.

I read this one book a few months ago that was a diary of a gunner on a bomber of his 25 missions. So that is bound to be pretty good, because he wrote it immediately. But you cannot trust stuff that people tell later on. As I said, they themselves may even believe it, and it probably is not true, or only partially true.

I read a few books by a Brit, Max Hastings, this summer, one on the Last year of the war in the pacific, the other on the Korean war. I really like him, and found him convincing. He has another on the last year in Europe, I have it but have not read it yet. I will link them. The book on Japan was real good, best I have read on that subject by a long shot.

I really recommend this author, history that is presented is generally so mythological, he is one that not only is convincing, he illustrates how history should be viewed by a historian, which most fail to comprehend. For one thing, the Cardinal rule, you have to forget everything that has happened since the time of the events, and view it in that context, to understand history. People tend to judge history by current standards, and they refuse to view it from the perspective of the actors at the time, so they make judgments, judging them as if they lived today, and knew everything that we have learned over the past 60+ years.


http://www.amazon.com/Retribution-Battle-J...bxgy_cc_b_img_b

http://www.amazon.com/Armageddon-Germany-1...9972&sr=8-1

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Marek Rojewski
post Sep 22 2009, 08:14 AM
Post #14


Experienced Guitar Lord
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.671
Joined: 26-May 08
From: Lodz, Poland
Member No.: 5.185



My grandparents were young when the war started, but still they were in the youth-wing of the underground army, and by the end of the war joined the "main force", were 2 of ones of my grandpas brothers served from the start. My grand grandfather was also in the AK (it is a shortcut of National Army in our language), and so were his 6 brothers, unfortunately all of his brothers were killed, because they were on a German list of "dangerous" Poles, a list mostly consisting Poles that took part in the events of the last days of WW1. Most of their sons were killed also, so all in all my family casualties were dire, and today only few of us remains (but we have the most "honor-graves" in few graveyards..).
My grand grandfather was also "typed" for execution, he stood under the wall with his brothers, but as he helped a German neighbor often in the past, the lady begged for his life, and saved him. He later saved her, because after the Russians arrived, Germans were thrown of their houses "back to Germany", and the process involved throwing stones and such...


Also my uncle was a Parachuter, trained in London to be relocated on Polish ground after the training he received. He survived the war, but was captured by NKWD after the Russians started occupying Poland, and executed.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sensible Jones
post Sep 22 2009, 12:05 PM
Post #15


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 6.549
Joined: 2-January 09
From: London-ish. UK.
Member No.: 6.517



My Fathers parents died during the Blitz on London as did my Maternal Grandfather. My Father served in the RAF, signing up in the early 50's.

There's an old guy, Larry, who is a member of our local Social Club who flew Lancasters during the War! He certainly still has stories to tell!!


--------------------
I'd rather have a full Bottle in front of me than a full Frontal Lobotomy!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Artemus
post Sep 22 2009, 12:31 PM
Post #16


Learning Tone Seeker - CHALLENGE STAR!
*

Group: Members
Posts: 866
Joined: 6-February 09
From: Manchester, UK
Member No.: 6.743



QUOTE (sted @ Sep 21 2009, 09:18 PM) *
Hey man! Long time no see! smile.gif


Heya! Yeah, I'm still lurking around here from time to time (usually when I'm procrastinating)

QUOTE (Praetorian @ Sep 21 2009, 09:55 PM) *
Here is your dad's ship!


Thank you biggrin.gif Actually, this inspired me to do a little bit of online searching and to my surprise I found a website dedicated to the vessel. If only my dad was still around, he would have LOVED to have seen the website and the association.
Not related to occupations, but of war-time relevance and interest: my dad grew up North Runcton/Kings Lynn. He told me that there was a kid he knew in his neighbourhood that came up to live in the area in order to escape the bombings in London - the boys name was Maurice Micklewhite.. he grew up to take a different name though


--------------------
My Myspace site here
My YouTube channel here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Praetorian
post Sep 22 2009, 12:52 PM
Post #17


Learning Apprentice Player & Challenge Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 1.994
Joined: 10-March 08
From: Albany NY USA
Member No.: 4.521



QUOTE (Marek Rojewski @ Sep 22 2009, 03:14 AM) *
My grandparents were young when the war started, but still they were in the youth-wing of the underground army, and by the end of the war joined the "main force", were 2 of ones of my grandpas brothers served from the start. My grand grandfather was also in the AK (it is a shortcut of National Army in our language), and so were his 6 brothers, unfortunately all of his brothers were killed, because they were on a German list of "dangerous" Poles, a list mostly consisting Poles that took part in the events of the last days of WW1. Most of their sons were killed also, so all in all my family casualties were dire, and today only few of us remains (but we have the most "honor-graves" in few graveyards..).
My grand grandfather was also "typed" for execution, he stood under the wall with his brothers, but as he helped a German neighbor often in the past, the lady begged for his life, and saved him. He later saved her, because after the Russians arrived, Germans were thrown of their houses "back to Germany", and the process involved throwing stones and such...


Also my uncle was a Parachuter, trained in London to be relocated on Polish ground after the training he received. He survived the war, but was captured by NKWD after the Russians started occupying Poland, and executed.


Unbelievable story! Thanks for sharing!!


--------------------
Ben
___________________________________________
"PLAY YOUR DAMN GUITAR!!"
- Kirk Hammett

Fender American Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
utak3r
post Sep 24 2009, 08:41 AM
Post #18


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 553
Joined: 3-January 09
From: Szczecin, Poland
Member No.: 6.530



Not so long ago I was watching a documentary (on History Channel) about a Warsaw Rising. It was a story of two German soldiers, who took a part in it... Oh man, they were practically mentally destroyed... The were talking about what they had to do and how they felt about it - and just couldn't do anything about it - they were just Wehrmacht soldiers (pretty different people were SS-mans - they were those who were ordering all these things).

I can't imagine living with such memories... one of them said he still can't sleep and can see those people in the night...
I recommend you to find this document and watch it - although it's a piece of a tough watching.

Hats off for all the WWII participants.


--------------------
sooner or later... you will meet the undertaker...
utak3r.pl
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 18th October 2017 - 12:25 PM