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> Berklee Recording Certification Is It Worth It?
Fingerspasm
post Nov 16 2009, 03:39 AM
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I am thinking about taking this Certification Course for Logic. The cost is $3500.00 U.S. Any opinions as to wether or not its worth it would be appreciated. I guess when I say worth it I am wanting to know if anyone knows of a better more cost effective way to get this type of education using an online course. Here are some details.


BMPR-162 Critical Listening 1
Dan Thompson (12 weeks, 3 credits)
Create compelling, professional-sounding songs by learning to identify the production elements that contribute to a well balanced, artful and professional-sounding mix.

BMPR-101a Desktop Music Production for Mac
Michael Bierylo, David Mash (12 weeks, 3 credits)
Master the tools and techniques for producing great-sounding music at home…and create high quality recordings ready for CD or MP3!

BMPR-173 Producing Music with Logic
Jeff Baust, David Doms (12 weeks, 3 credits)
Strengthen your technical understanding of Logic Pro and heighten your overall creative abilities in music production in this 12-week course. Harness the power of Logic's extensive software instruments, and learn to record, edit, and mix your project like a pro

This post has been edited by Fingerspasm: Nov 16 2009, 04:44 AM


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Marc_Maiden
post Nov 16 2009, 04:30 AM
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well i can tell you from experience than being able to record and mix well is one of the KEY things to sounding professional.


i dont want to sound arrogant, but i am a really good guitar player, HOWEVER, im not so good at mixing different types of tracks and instruments together.


the result: good technique and ideas, but off sounding because of the mix.

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the question is though, do you think you would benefit from this? is this something you want to do as a career or a hobby?


either way, there is no such thing as a waste when it comes to education!

knowledge is power!


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Fingerspasm
post Nov 16 2009, 04:42 AM
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QUOTE (Marc_Maiden @ Nov 15 2009, 10:30 PM) *
well i can tell you from experience than being able to record and mix well is one of the KEY things to sounding professional.


i dont want to sound arrogant, but i am a really good guitar player, HOWEVER, im not so good at mixing different types of tracks and instruments together.


the result: good technique and ideas, but off sounding because of the mix.

----------------


the question is though, do you think you would benefit from this? is this something you want to do as a career or a hobby?


either way, there is no such thing as a waste when it comes to education!

knowledge is power!


I know that I will benefit. I guess I want to know if there might be a better way to get this type of education for less cost. Maybe someone else has an experience with this type schooling and did they thing it was worth it or do they wish they had gone a different route.

I am mainly a guitar player but have recently gotten into recording pretty heavy. The results are mixed. People who do not record and play in bands have said that my recordings of a band that I did were great and that they would like for me to to an EP for them. But then I have submitted the same songs on forums to get advice and have been told that the recording is everything from descent to total crap.

My goal is to be able to have a small home studio where I can do recordings for small bands etc. And maybe in the future give guitar lessons etc. I currently own my own business but would like to retire in the next 10 years and fall into the studio and that lessons full/part time as a way to stay busy doing what I love.

So I guess I should go back and edit the original post and ask is it cost effective compared to what some other people might know is out there and available for this type of thing.

Thanks for your input


This post has been edited by Fingerspasm: Nov 16 2009, 04:45 AM


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Neurologi
post Nov 16 2009, 05:09 AM
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Strap yourself in! Here is an alternative. Cheaper and probably more comprehensive plus you can do at your own pace and get a whole bunch of stuff besides. Anyway. Have a look.


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Fingerspasm
post Nov 16 2009, 01:21 PM
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QUOTE (Neurologi @ Nov 15 2009, 11:09 PM) *
Strap yourself in! Here is an alternative. Cheaper and probably more comprehensive plus you can do at your own pace and get a whole bunch of stuff besides. Anyway. Have a look.


I took a quick look at the site that you directed me to. It looks really good so far. Am going to really go over it and take the tour in a couple of hours once I get the kids to school and my work sorted out. Should be a slow day in the office today so I am really excited to check this out. Looks very professional. Thanks for the link.


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jafomatic
post Nov 16 2009, 04:02 PM
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QUOTE (Marc_Maiden @ Nov 15 2009, 09:30 PM) *
i dont want to sound arrogant, but i am a really good guitar player


That's the most direct route to arrogance though, y'know? smile.gif

This post has been edited by jafomatic: Nov 16 2009, 04:13 PM


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Nov 16 2009, 04:52 PM
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There are a lot of places that will do certification for Logic etc. I'm sure that what they do will bring you up to a good level in Logic but TBH I doubt that it will be much more than working through. and spending time with, the manual. Nonetheless it can be helpful to have someone explain things. I have to say though that I don't know of anyone working semi or fully professionally in mastering or recording studios who has certification but I'm sure it won't hurt to have it.

Can you do this better/differently?

1-Learn the basics of the sequencer and then get an internship at a good recording studio. Most places expect you to do the trash jobs for free and only after some months, if they like you, will they spend time mentoring you. It's the route most of us take before we have a wife and kids to support - once you have those it may just not be possible so might not be feasible for you.

Where this does win out over a 'certification' course is if you intern with someone who is really good. They will give you a very good insight in to what they are doing and why. In addition, you will probably get to work on hardware and software that is pro quality.

2- Teach yourself. Really work through the manual and experiment. Much of a good recording comes down to experience - knowing what works and what doesn't, where, when and how. Don't just track and mix: critically listen to a wide range of recordings and work out how and why they were produced the way they are. Then deconstruct them/re-mix/remaster them yourself and see if you can get them to sound different/better/worse and why.

3- Absorb everything - ask lots of questions, read as much as you can.


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Fingerspasm
post Nov 16 2009, 05:10 PM
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QUOTE (tonymiro @ Nov 16 2009, 10:52 AM) *
There are a lot of places that will do certification for Logic etc. I'm sure that what they do will bring you up to a good level in Logic but TBH I doubt that it will be much more than working through. and spending time with, the manual. Nonetheless it can be helpful to have someone explain things. I have to say though that I don't know of anyone working semi or fully professionally in mastering or recording studios who has certification but I'm sure it won't hurt to have it.

Can you do this better/differently?

1-Learn the basics of the sequencer and then get an internship at a good recording studio. Most places expect you to do the trash jobs for free and only after some months, if they like you, will they spend time mentoring you. It's the route most of us take before we have a wife and kids to support - once you have those it may just not be possible so might not be feasible for you.

Where this does win out over a 'certification' course is if you intern with someone who is really good. They will give you a very good insight in to what they are doing and why. In addition, you will probably get to work on hardware and software that is pro quality.

2- Teach yourself. Really work through the manual and experiment. Much of a good recording comes down to experience - knowing what works and what doesn't, where, when and how. Don't just track and mix: critically listen to a wide range of recordings and work out how and why they were produced the way they are. Then deconstruct them/re-mix/remaster them yourself and see if you can get them to sound different/better/worse and why.

3- Absorb everything - ask lots of questions, read as much as you can.


Thanks for the input. The one class that I thought would be a good class out of the 3 I would have to take is the Critical Listening Class. The other 2 seemed like something that would be good but that could be found elsewhere for cheaper. So maybe I will just take one of the 3 classes and not worry about getting the full certification just yet.

The site that Neurologi pointed me toward seems to have some very good courses so I am going to check that out next.

As always thanks for taking the time to help steer me in the right direction. smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 4 2010, 05:19 AM
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The Berklee courses are usually quite good as it's a good school to start with. Before you begin, get a mac of kind that will run LOGIC and buy LOGIC EXPRESS or LOGIC of course and spend some time on the software. Even if you have to run LOGIC EXPRESS on a MAC MINI, just getting behind the wheel and doing some recording/mixing will help you more than you can imagine when it comes time to take courses/tests etc.

Spending time on the software and actually using it and figuring out its quirks is the real key. I've been using logic since version 8 which is not that long, and I've gotten more out of recording/mixing my own projects that just about anything else. Once you get the basics down, any course/training will make much more sense and you can progress much more quickly.

But if you want to learn LOGIC, you need your own rig. Trying to do it without a Mac and without the software would be hopeless.

As far as retiring in to recording, that is a worthy and noble goal but realize it may not work out given that the middle is being cut out of the industry. Smaller project studios are getting wiped out because everyone can afford their own rig now. The barrier to entry is quite low. All you need is a Mac, Logic, some decent mics and bingo. So go at it because you love it, if you find a way to make money, you can turn that secret in to a business. "How to make money with your home studio" which could generate much more revenue than billing hourly at your studio.

Todd


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jul 5 2010, 06:59 PM
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I agree with Todd. Small and middle studios will face problems in the years to come. It may be wise to focus activities on several different areas of audio production, not necessarily music. Mobile audio production can be interesting too, so if you make your studio mobile, it can bring out some interesting jobs.


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