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> This Video Could Change Your Life!
A.C. Dega
post Nov 24 2009, 11:58 PM
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This is not my video just found it on youtube.

This post has been edited by A.C. Dega: Nov 25 2009, 12:07 AM
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Jakub Luptovec
post Nov 25 2009, 12:34 AM
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Well.. either I am that rare few percent guy, or this video is completely wrong (I guess this one is correct). Learning songs while learning chords and scales is essential, since songs teach you how to put all that stuff to use - how the ones, that inspired you thought while composing, what you love.

And I dont really care for stairway to heaven anyway... I heard it thousand times but still havent found one thing on it, that I like...

EDIT: The stuff around 6:00 is also wrong as heck, since some riffs, chord progressions (using open strings and harmonics for example) cannot be transposed - just maybe by capo, but even thats not always solution - > I wouldnt put as much emphasis on it, as on constant and very precise practice with metronome and also just pure having fun with guitar

EDIT2: Plus, I hate that guy. He sounds like some 60 yrs old grandpa, who is trying to tell me, that he is SO CLEVER AND SO ACCOMPLISHED PLAYER and I should just sit, be silent and listen to him... (personal felling, I know)

This post has been edited by Jakub Luptovec: Nov 25 2009, 12:44 AM


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Boson
post Nov 25 2009, 12:36 AM
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Has this guy been watching me wink.gif


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Sollesnes
post Nov 25 2009, 08:44 AM
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Guitarists do skip important steps like ear training and general theory use/knowledge. Working on them would help you move on, and become a better musician. Working on them too much, and not learning to play music, is a negative thing though of course.
What he is saying, Jakub, is that learning songs above your level (using tabs!) will have negative effects on you, skipping steps in the learning curve.
But I think everyone is different... if we all used the same "formula" to become great musicians, we would all be the same.

This post has been edited by Sollesnes: Nov 25 2009, 08:45 AM
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fkalich
post Nov 25 2009, 10:41 AM
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Good response. I suggest this book.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/014311310...;pf_rd_i=507846

There are other others on the subject, but this is probably the best book. He outlines the recent findings in brain research. We have learned more in the last 10 years than in the previous 10 thousand, with respect to how the human mind learns things, and what the impediments to learning are. Although the author frequently illustrates the principles using case studies of brain disorders or injuries, the principles apply to all types of learning. I was able to see how these principles can be applied towards my guitar practice (among other things), and I am finding the results to be quite dramatic, very satisfying. Although the bad news is, to really learn a skill such as guitar very quickly, to learn in the way in which your brain mappings can be modified most efficiently, you have to give up the fun things, it becomes work, kind of like physical rehabilitation therapy. If it does not feel like work, you are probably not helping yourself much, and quite possibly setting yourself backwards. You will find in the reading that bad learning practices are not just less effective, they actually are an impediment towards accomplishment. They actually do physical damage to the network of neural synapses that one ideally would like to create for oneself. However the damage is always reversible. You do see very significant positive results if you follow these recently discovered principles, and this keeps you motivated. I don't really want to tell people my methodology, until I feel the case study (by myself on myself) is concluded with demonstratively positive results. However, here is what I think is the best book on the subject. He mentions musicianship in a few places, but primarily you have to use your head (and full concentration), to figure out your own system, consistent with these recently discovered scientific principles.


QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Nov 25 2009, 02:44 AM) *
Guitarists do skip important steps like ear training and general theory use/knowledge. Working on them would help you move on, and become a better musician. Working on them too much, and not learning to play music, is a negative thing though of course.
What he is saying, Jakub, is that learning songs above your level (using tabs!) will have negative effects on you, skipping steps in the learning curve.
But I think everyone is different... if we all used the same "formula" to become great musicians, we would all be the same.


This post has been edited by fkalich: Nov 25 2009, 11:43 AM
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Daniel Realpe
post Nov 25 2009, 07:22 PM
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I remember I had my lucky moment where I felt I nailed one lead solo, after that I knew I could learn a lot of songs and solos.

I say lucky cause that's what I remember, I'm sure there was one of those confusing and deceptive moments when I thought I couldn't do this.

Ear training is crucial. Sing a lot, melodies, actual words, even solos, that helps a lot. It doesn't even have to out loud.


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Sollesnes
post Nov 25 2009, 10:51 PM
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QUOTE (fkalich @ Nov 25 2009, 10:41 AM) *
Good response. I suggest this book.


Thank you smile.gif
Reading your great post, I just clicked the order button on this book myself, thank you biggrin.gif
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Hammerhead
post Nov 26 2009, 01:02 AM
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I don't think this can change my life... but I get what I think he is saying, understanding music/guitar, will make you learn/play better more quickly. Something like that eh? Which is true, if you know how chords are made, you can improvise and perform more easily. Same with scales, if you "understand" the relative minor scale, then jumping to it when needed is much easier. Same with Modes...I just think he takes a bit of time to come around to the point. dry.gif I did some digging on his site, and he does seem to know his business, but I can see how the "grand Pa" routine could offend or put off some, it is pretty dry!!!

Thanks for sharing it with us, I am finding the tortoise guitar site helpful. cool.gif


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