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> Theory Behind Angus Young Meets Billy Gibbons
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post Jan 4 2010, 02:33 AM
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Hey Adrian I'm just trying to understand what the key is behind your lesson? Just to explain where I am coming from.
If the song is in A major then how come we use the G chord and how come u use A minor blues scale where the relative minor would be F#m
any insight would be appericated mellow.gif blink.gif
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djohnneay
post Jan 4 2010, 01:03 PM
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but blues tends to have both major and minor scales of one key mixed up within a song.
This means that A minor scale will most likely be played over a G chord, and major can be played over a F# chord.
Scales that can be used in blues songs are likely to be:
A minor pentatonic : A C D E G
A major pentatonic : A B C# E F#
A blues : A C D D# E G

Most of the time when in A major, C D and G are passing notes, so you would for example go C# C B and end on an A note. This makes the C sound like a blue note, and not like an out of scale note. I hope this all makes sense, and I explained it correctly, you might want to wait for a reply from Adrian himself wink.gif

I would advise you to train your ear also, so you don't only 'know' what sounds good, but can also hear it.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 4 2010, 02:01 PM
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djohnneay is right, although the last part of his explanation is confusing.

The composition is blues, and it has major/minor based harmony (A major and D major are from A major key, and G major is from A minor key)
In the same time the scales in use are A major pentatonic/A minor pentatonic/blues. When combined together you get a lot of notes suitable for both A major and A minor key. Even using A minor pentatonic scale alone will get you the bluesy feel, but all 3 scales are equally important.

This post has been edited by Ivan Milenkovic: Jan 4 2010, 02:03 PM


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zoom
post Jan 4 2010, 02:40 PM
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Thanks Djohnneay and Ivan. I've now got some homework. So we are really not playing major or minor but blues which is a mix? Is there any more info on this around GMC.
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eriktodal
post Jan 4 2010, 04:02 PM
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I (my)music theory relative minor is - not - closely related to major. They do however share the same notes.

Parallell minor/major is closely related. You hear this in a lot of blues and country. Generally major and minor shares the same dominant - V7 to Imin or V7 to Imaj. (ie. G7 to Cmin and G7 to Cmaj) - which is one "proof" of this.

In my ears its the changes between parallell minor and major that makes a typical country tune sound easygoing, (sometimes too easygoing?). You could expect that a sudden removal of 3 flats(minor->major) would make a bigger impact, but is doesn't as long as you are parallell.

Hope this isn't to confusing, it just means you can use either pentatonic as long as it sounds good. Angus is the master of making this sound cool every time, which of course depends on much more than just choosing a pentatonic.
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Sensible Jones
post Jan 4 2010, 06:01 PM
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Just to add a bit more confusion to this...
By being based in A and using the G and D chords you could also think of this as being A Mixolydian too!
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Adrian Figallo
post Jan 4 2010, 09:26 PM
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ohh im super late here, sorry didn't saw the thread before!
djohnneay and ivan's explanations are correct tho smile.gif.

when i compose a song or a solo i don't really think on scales or theory, i just sing or "hear" the melody in my head, so didn't really tough of this before, and yeah the chord progression sounds quite major, not sure why the minor penta or the blues sounds good on it, but it's the way rock n roll is biggrin.gif

Thanks guys for the theory!


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Daniel Realpe
post Jan 4 2010, 10:07 PM
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I really think it has to do with perception. The blues scale has been used so much that it really feels that it fits even on a major context, and it creates this really typical tension associated with rock. I really like it.

This post has been edited by Daniel Realpe: Jan 4 2010, 10:08 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 4 2010, 10:46 PM
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QUOTE (zoom @ Jan 4 2010, 02:40 PM) *
Thanks Djohnneay and Ivan. I've now got some homework. So we are really not playing major or minor but blues which is a mix? Is there any more info on this around GMC.


Now that you asked - there is! smile.gif

I just completed my new blues series "mixing major and minor patterns in blues". Search it, 3 lessons are on, and 2 more to come very soon, they are already on GMC, but not published yet. If you have some questions about it, let me know. Although it is blues, you can apply the same concept and patterns with any form of music.


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zoom
post Jan 5 2010, 11:02 AM
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Thanks for your replies. Ivan I done just that and checked your lessons!
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