Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Quintuplets
Jackson64
post Jan 23 2010, 12:16 AM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 19-January 10
Member No.: 9.224



Hey Everyone,

I just joined the site a few days ago and I'm really enjoying the community and all the lessons on here. I've really cleared up many of the things I've had trouble understanding in theory and with technique.

One thing I've really had trouble gaining a grasp on are odd note groupings such as "quintuplets." I understand triplets and use them often, but triplets are easy for me because the second note of the three note grouping is simply off beat. I also use little counting phrases such as saying "1-e-and-a" for 16th notes or "tri-pl-et" during triplet rhythms. Being able to have some kind of guide line like that helps me when first learning a new type of grouping. Quintuplets and "tuplets" in general have caused me confusion because of how they have to be played evenly inside of a smaller note grouping.

My question is does anyone here use a counting method during quintuplets? I've tried the concept of just listening to music that uses quintuplets to just get a feel for them, but I'm not really consistent on my timings and I like to have some method I can fall back on to make sure I'm staying in time such as a way of counting them in my head. I'm trying to learn them because there comes in a time in writing music when using eight note triplets is too slow and sixteenth note triplets are too fast (same goes for 16th and 32nd notes). Plus the more tricks you know the more interesting the music right tongue.gif



Any help would be great and I'd like to know any methods anyone has used to learn these irregular groupings.


Thanks
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Staffy
post Jan 23 2010, 12:28 AM
Post #2


Learning Tone Master
Group Icon

Group: MVC
Posts: 2.294
Joined: 18-June 09
From: Genarp, Sweden
Member No.: 7.291



I terms of learning quintuplets (or other tuplets), try to make sequences descending or ascending and play them to metronome. 5 & 7 is not so hard, but when You come to 9 and eleven..... ohmy.gif
In the matter of transcribing, I don't really have seen many cases where tuplets have been played in a "thinking" manner - it's rather so that the player had aimed for a certain note, and in order to land on the beat, he just have to play some little faster... but of course there are some exceptions (for instance in tapping sequences).... to transcribe this though, it must be slowed down to a very slow speed...
I think a good practice will also be to practice odd meters, eg. 5/4, 7/4 etc.

//Staffay


--------------------


Guitars: Ibanez AM-200, Ibanez GB-10, Fender Stratocaster Classic Player, Warmouth Custom Built, Suhr Classic Strat, Gibson Les Paul Standard 2003, Ibanez steel-string
Amps: Fender Hot Rod Deluxe, Marshall JMP 2103, AER 60
Effects: BOSS DD-20, Danelectro Trans. Overdrive, TC-Electronics G-Major, Dunlop Wah-wah, Original SansAmp, BOSS DD-2
Music by Staffy can be found at: Staffay at MySpace
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Tolek
post Jan 23 2010, 12:53 AM
Post #3


Learning Rock Star
Group Icon

Group: Student Instructor
Posts: 2.888
Joined: 23-March 07
From: Brighton
Member No.: 1.402



Staffy is very right, I agree with him, but I´d like to add that you can count the notes that you play. Starty slowly and get progressively faster. Don´t forget to have the note, which is on the first beat, in mind. Example:


>
-12------------------
-----15p13p12--------
------------------14-
---------------------
---------------------
---------------------


Practise this lick slowly while accentuating the 12 fret on the e string.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Caelumamittendum
post Jan 23 2010, 12:59 AM
Post #4


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 4.461
Joined: 14-June 08
From: Copenhagen, Denmark
Member No.: 5.298



There are lots of runs that can be cool with quintuplets and easy places to start, which is easy for the fingers. One pretty similar to Tolek's example I've included below.

I would usually just count: "one-two-three-four-five-one-two-three etc..."

This post has been edited by Caelumamittendum: Jan 23 2010, 01:00 AM
Attached File(s)
Attached File  quintuplets.gp5 ( 2.43K ) Number of downloads: 118
 


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 23 2010, 02:05 AM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 25.396
Joined: 20-November 07
From: Belgrade, Serbia
Member No.: 3.341



I just count them as irregular groupings, in 5 or 7 groups. However I always counted them when walking, since I was kid, so it came natural in some way smile.gif


--------------------
- Ivan's Video Chat Lesson Notes HERE
- Check out my GMC Profile and Lessons
- (Please subscribe to my) YouTube Official Channel
- Let's be connected through ! Facebook! :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Jackson64
post Jan 25 2010, 12:40 AM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2
Joined: 19-January 10
Member No.: 9.224



Thanks for all the tips smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djohnneay
post Jan 25 2010, 01:21 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 385
Joined: 8-February 09
Member No.: 6.760



QUOTE (Jackson64 @ Jan 25 2010, 12:40 AM) *
Thanks for all the tips smile.gif

Is it okay if I give you just 1 more ?
You can try playing the 5-note lick slowly and tapping your foot on the first note.
Then try to get a steady metronome beat with you foot, when you succeed, your ready to play with metronome biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Artemus
post Jan 25 2010, 05:35 PM
Post #8


Learning Tone Seeker - CHALLENGE STAR!
*

Group: Members
Posts: 866
Joined: 6-February 09
From: Manchester, UK
Member No.: 6.743



I wholly appreciate the difficulties in getting ones head around note groupings beyond the standard subdivisions. I think mainly because it's so customary to use symmetrical rhythmic patterns and melodies are easier to create with intuitive crotchetts, quavers and triplets thereof..etc What I'm saying is that on some level I think it's a psychological perspective - that odd meter times and groupings don't come naturally.. or do they?? Polyrhythms and odd meters abound in all sorts of tribal beats and native music across the world. IMHO it the accustomisation to popular western music and conventions that makes "odd" rhythms less intuitive.
This point is could be debated I'm sure; it's just my opinion.
Anyhow, I think it's all well and good counting an even 5 or 7 or n number of beats but I personally found a much greater understanding by playing around with polyrhythmic patterns. For instance, playing a 5:2 pattern will help you understand where exactly the quintuplet beats reside and where accents could emphasise the pattern, much much more than just playing 5:1
Even though guitar playing is usually monophonically emphasised, leads/riffs etc (generally speaking of course), polyrhythms are best understood by playing against a contrary rhythm, i.e. drum beat, foot tap etc.
Interestingly, Steve Vai wrote a little article on the matter. It's on his webpage and it's well written:
http://www.vai.com/LittleBlackDots/tempomental.html
Hope it helps.


--------------------
My Myspace site here
My YouTube channel here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Pedja Simovic
post Jan 26 2010, 04:04 PM
Post #9


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 8.109
Joined: 13-September 08
From: Nis, Serbia
Member No.: 5.892



Think about word University

Divide it now as a quintuplet

U-ni-ver-si-ty
1 2 3 4 5

I find this to be very easy and probably best way to count quintuplet wink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Daniel Realpe
post Feb 5 2010, 05:07 PM
Post #10


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 5.655
Joined: 11-October 09
From: Bogota
Member No.: 7.694



I found this lesson on it



what I do in my head is count:

Ta doo ta doo doo - Ta doo ta doo doo -Ta doo ta doo doo



--------------------
Visit my:
INSTRUCTOR PROFILE

"If a composer could say what he had to say in words he would not bother trying to say it in music."
Gustav Mahler


Subscribe to my Youtube Channel here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Damir Puh
post Feb 5 2010, 06:08 PM
Post #11


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 144
Joined: 12-January 10
From: Tetovo/Skopje - Macedonia
Member No.: 9.129



Gotta love them drummers. laugh.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 27th May 2017 - 01:45 AM