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> How Do You Study A Guitarists?
shredmaster1393
post Feb 3 2010, 07:05 AM
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Hey GMC i was hear all the time that the great artist like Tommy Emmanuel, eric clapton, bb king and many more study their favorite guitarists, and that is true to how they are good, but how exactly do you do that, i am stuck on how to actually study the right things. i dont want to copy there style exactly!!!! someone help!!PleASE biggrin.gif


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jafomatic
post Feb 3 2010, 08:22 AM
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Mostly you do this by asking yourself questions and then seeking the answers. Some examples:

1. Who do I admire?
2. Why do I admire those folks?
3. Do I want to be able to do what they do?
4. Who would know how to teach me these things? Can I learn them on my own?

And so on. If you don't know the answer to #2 then you may need to revisit #1.


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Staffy
post Feb 3 2010, 08:33 AM
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In my experience there are several ways to do it - it depends on what You really want to learn, eg. sound, technique, expression, timing etc. But I guess the most common way to do it is to study some solos/songs and try to play them so close as possible. When You played it some 3-400 times, phrases like the one's You've practiced starts to show up in Your own playing - and then its called influences....

Another approach would be to pick a favourite phras/lick and really study it in depth. Which tones are used? Which accents? How it is picked? How is the timing against the beat? When You so learned that, You can make up Your own phrases built on the same concept and it will sound like You anyway, since its very hard to play EXACTLY as someone else, even if some may have succeeded with that.

Good Luck!

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AdamB
post Feb 3 2010, 10:08 AM
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I dunno about anyone else but for me, studying a guitarist I admire is something that just kinda happens automatically. when I find a guitarist I really like, I tend to become obssessed with it and just listen to everything they've done for a good few months. Then I just learn to play their music and you start noticing little ideas/techniques they use repeatdly and that is the essence of learning someones style really. I don't know about you, but with me I find I never get to a point where I copy someone else exactly because by the time I've learnt 3 or 4 songs, I get bored of their sound, and move on. As I move on, I tend to incorporate bits and pieces that I learned that have stuck with me and mush it all up with what other guitarists I've learnt from.

Like take paul gilbert for example, after learning a few of his songs you can see he really likes doing 3nps runs with string skips, he's quite fond of the dominant interval patterns in 3nps string skips (like the intro to sacrifice and in tech.diff and scarified) and he uses a mixture of legato and alternate picking (which I think is something he got in turn from van halen). He usually taps with his first (index) finger rather than the others, which I find unusual. His playing is pretty scale-based for the most part as if you know your 3nps major scale shapes you'll be using them alot, like the mini-song B.R.O. It's super fast and clean, but he's not actually picking everything, which you can kinda here when you listen to it, he's using a lot of legato to make it sound smooth.

Then you can contrast that with someone like steve vai, who tends to shy away from scalar patterns. His playing is very intervalic in nature and almost at times trys to play the note in the scale/sequence that your hand least expects to play next. Not as out and out fast as paul gilbert, vai tends to play with quite a bit of restraint (not always though smile.gif ) . Seems fond of harmonized sounds, like liberty, similar in a way to brian may's brittle harmonized tone. Uses the vibrato arm an inordinate ammount with great skill, which is something that is rare in a guitarist as far as I've seen thus far. Has a lot of flare. Possibly one of the most emotive players to actually watch playing, which helps create the impression that he could play anything and it would be super easy for him (which probably isn't entirely true, but that's the illusion great guitarists create).

So I'd say just listen to them a lot, learn some of their songs or some of the 'in the style of' lessons on GMC. In time you'll just sort of begin to see what it is about the player that makes them who they are.
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Damir Puh
post Feb 3 2010, 12:23 PM
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Some quick tips (since Staffy and AdamB covered a lot of the topic smile.gif ):

- Take a cool lick of your favorite player and learn it note for note. Try to mimick the timing, accents, stylistic techiques etc. as close as possible. Then go beyond that: analyze why the lick sounds cool - is it the rhythm? The contour? Is it the note choice? The techniques included? What chord / progression is happening behind it? Soon enough you'll discover the player's trademarks and you'll be able to understand the "mechanics" of his phrasing and his signature sound.

- Once you go through a number of "signature licks" it's probably a good idea to analyze the player's songwriting style...structure, arrangement, harmony, dynamics, etc... Then maybe do the same with his gear and setup. smile.gif

- Read interviews, watch instructional videos, read blog/forum posts.

- Change things around. Take the rhythmic map of a phrase and change the notes to create your own (replace notes in other octave, play doublestops etc..). Do the oposite, keep the notes the same, but change the rhythm around (change the note length, change the pause length, etc..). Change the articulation. Change the tone. The majority of the most recognisable guitar styles were developed this way.

I hope this will help. wink.gif




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Ivan Milenkovic
post Feb 4 2010, 01:27 AM
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The best way to do it is to listen to albums and start playing the same stuff you hear there smile.gif


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Tomas Santa Clar...
post Feb 4 2010, 02:08 AM
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QUOTE (jafomatic @ Feb 3 2010, 09:22 AM) *
Mostly you do this by asking yourself questions and then seeking the answers. Some examples:

1. Who do I admire?
2. Why do I admire those folks?
3. Do I want to be able to do what they do?
4. Who would know how to teach me these things? Can I learn them on my own?

And so on. If you don't know the answer to #2 then you may need to revisit #1.



BANG!
BANG!
BANG!
BANG! BANG! well said jafo
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Emir Hot
post Feb 4 2010, 10:40 AM
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QUOTE (Damir Puh @ Feb 3 2010, 11:23 AM) *
Some quick tips (since Staffy and AdamB covered a lot of the topic smile.gif ):

- Take a cool lick of your favorite player and learn it note for note. Try to mimick the timing, accents, stylistic techiques etc. as close as possible. Then go beyond that: analyze why the lick sounds cool - is it the rhythm? The contour? Is it the note choice? The techniques included? What chord / progression is happening behind it? Soon enough you'll discover the player's trademarks and you'll be able to understand the "mechanics" of his phrasing and his signature sound.

- Once you go through a number of "signature licks" it's probably a good idea to analyze the player's songwriting style...structure, arrangement, harmony, dynamics, etc... Then maybe do the same with his gear and setup. smile.gif

- Read interviews, watch instructional videos, read blog/forum posts.

- Change things around. Take the rhythmic map of a phrase and change the notes to create your own (replace notes in other octave, play doublestops etc..). Do the oposite, keep the notes the same, but change the rhythm around (change the note length, change the pause length, etc..). Change the articulation. Change the tone. The majority of the most recognisable guitar styles were developed this way.

I hope this will help. wink.gif

This is an awesome response. I used to analyse players this way and build my own thing around it.


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Daniel Realpe
post Feb 17 2010, 03:53 PM
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well I see it more like studying the music he plays,...and sometimes watching the movement in the hands if it's some bizarre technique, but it all starts in the ears


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