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eaglesnh4
post Jul 28 2010, 12:10 PM
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Hi Guys, Im currently thinking about setting up a home recording studio at my bands rehearsal room. Another band i know have done it and get great quality recordings. Now i have a fast pc, cubase 5! now... do i buy a mixer or an audio interface? im going to be recording drums,vocals,guitars ? ive been looking at M-Audio Audio interfaces however they only have 4 inputs and this is quite expensive, now how would i record drums with only 4 inputs? this is were i get confused, anyone that knows about this kind of stuff, if you could point me in the right direction.
so basically i have a fast pc. cubase 5. now could you give me a list of basics that i need to buy next?
thanks

I have not much money to spend but im willing to get saving!


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MickeM
post Jul 28 2010, 01:14 PM
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Hi!
...fantastic. I had a long reply and managed to delete all the text before I posted dry.gif

new attempt

Long story short, one channel per instrument (at least) where snare, kick, tom cound as seperare instruments. Likely you will need between 12-16 channels.
I say, forget about recording to your PC with a 4 channel M-Audio. I suggest you have a look at Zoom R16 which can record 8 channels simultaneously. If you need more channels you can either get another R16 and chain the two together or add a mixer to the single R16. I.e adding a 4 channel mixer you end up with 11 channels.
Add two 4 channel mixers for 14 channels.

For Example:
R16
----
1) Bass (lined)
2) Guitar
3) Guitar
4) Vocals
5) Kick
6) Snare
7) 4 channel mixer with the left side of the drumkit
8) 4 channel mixer with the right side of the drumkit

I'm sure you can find other ways to set the channels aswell.


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eaglesnh4
post Jul 28 2010, 02:37 PM
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Could i not just buy an 8 channel mixer say a Alesis 8 Channel mixer for £100

whats the difference? will it affect the quality of my recordings? or is that just down to the microphones??
so if i buy top of the range microphones and have a cheap mixer... will it affect the quality?


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MickeM
post Jul 28 2010, 02:57 PM
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QUOTE (eaglesnh4 @ Jul 28 2010, 03:37 PM) *
Could i not just buy an 8 channel mixer say a Alesis 8 Channel mixer for £100

whats the difference? will it affect the quality of my recordings? or is that just down to the microphones??
so if i buy top of the range microphones and have a cheap mixer... will it affect the quality?

In the end you would want to end up with one wav-file per recorded track, i.e per mike/instrument. Not everything recorded into one and the same wav file. That will be impossible to mix afterwards but you have to stick with the panning and levels that you set on the mixer table.

If you're looking for the simplest solution at lower quality you always have those pocket recorders, like Zoom H2, H4n and other brands. Good enough for recording ideas and rehearsals but far from studio quality.


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Bogdan Radovic
post Jul 28 2010, 06:01 PM
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Generally depends a lot on quality of recordings you want to make. I would recommend an 8 channel recording interface like this one:

http://www.presonus.com/products/Detail.aspx?ProductId=43

Or some cheaper audio card from Emu that enable expansion so you can get more channels if you add external Preamp.

But if you want really simple demo recordings, you can get a mixer and digital recorder connected to it and just record straight stereo mixes of your rehearsals.

Generally when making good recordings, you don't need the whole band playing - rather record one instrument at a time.


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 29 2010, 05:35 AM
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If you want to have a separate track for every mic so that you can actually mix, instead of just recording the entire thing to one stereo group, you are going to need an interface with several inputs. I've recently added the TASCAM 164 UF to my project studio and love it.

It has 6 XLR inputs and a host of other inputs as well. It can send input to a separate track in your recording software. That way you can have control over level, eq, fx, etc. for each mic in your set up. I've recorded 8 tracks at once in Logic and Garage Band and it works great. It's a USB 2.0 interface and is about $300.

It's also a full size stereo 16 channel mixer with LED bridge. For the price it's hard to beat. Here is a picture and a link to a post I did about the unit.

Attached Image

GEARING UP FOR YOUR HOME STUDIO - INTERFACES

I've owned several recording interfaces and this one is my fav by far.

You are also going to need some decent speakers to mix on. I've been very happy with KRK ROCKITS and ALESIS MONITOR ONES. These are very cheap compared to some of the pricey options and sound great for mixing. Expect to spend $300 a pair for decent powered speakers. You can use your own power amp and save a bit. Here is a pick of the monitors I'm using currently.
Attached Image

Todd

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jul 29 2010, 05:39 AM


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Dejan Farkas
post Jul 29 2010, 09:16 AM
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Since you don't have a huge budget for this here is my proposal smile.gif

For drums, get MIDI triggers or "draw" drums in some editor like ezdrummer, addictive drums, or similar..
It is very expensive to get good live drum sound, the most expensive part here is a well treated acoustic room..

Now if you want to record other instruments live, you need an audio interface or mixer that can handle that. If you have an interface that will record several instruments just to one track in cubase it will not be possible to mix it later, so recommend to record one instrument at the time. Any M-Audio or even better, EMU can do it for you.

And for the rest of the money get some nice monitors, to really hear what you recorded smile.gif


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maharzan
post Jul 29 2010, 01:40 PM
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Forget about live drumming recording if you are looking for that pro quality recording.. LOTS of things go in there and even pros have hard time trying to get that perfect drum sound. If this is just for okay record / demo / something you want to put up on your site or youtube to show you guys are playing live then you might need a good 12 - 16 track mixer which can be fed to your PC via audio interface. But again this can be take quite a budget. smile.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Jul 29 2010, 04:04 PM
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The cheapest solution would be the M-Audio Delta 1010....there's even a rack version which is cool

it has 10 ins, 10 outs

Midi, S/pdif



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Ivan Milenkovic
post Aug 8 2010, 06:59 PM
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I agree with Daniel. Cheapest solution would definitely be M-Audio Delta 1010 system.

This is if you really want to record whole drums and be able to mix them properly. You mentioned you don't have big budget. Try to ask your bandmates if they want to invest as well. Investments in the studio are usually - big.

M-Audio Delta 1010 ~550$
Average Drum Mic Kit (Shure PG kit) ~400$
cables ~ 200$

Don't forget that you need a nice room with good acoustic treatment as well, or the sound will not be that great.


If you ask me, for your demo recordings, you don't need any of that. Just get a good 2 channel audio interface and work your way from there. Record drums in stereo with a pair of cheap condensers, and everything else later on (through software). These demos will be enough for information. Later on, you can pay a real studio if you record an album.


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Aug 8 2010, 07:57 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Aug 8 2010, 05:59 PM) *
...


If you ask me, for your demo recordings, you don't need any of that. Just get a good 2 channel audio interface and work your way from there. Record drums in stereo with a pair of cheap condensers, and everything else later on (through software). These demos will be enough for information. Later on, you can pay a real studio if you record an album.


Absolutely right Ivan.

Prior to the introduction of DAWs a lot of demos were recorded on quite basic 4 track tape decks and we bounced tracks and spliced tape. When I first started out in studio work a big professional studio then was 16 track and a lot of demo recording facilities were either 2 or 4 track. If you look at how the classic albums were recorded prior to about 1980 many were done on quite limited channel count. The shift for home recording to daws with 64 or more tracks is great but in an awful lot of cases it is just overkill and it doesn't hurt to learn how to bounce tracks properly.

If you are used to using a console/mixer and prefer to physical move the faders then go with a desk. If you get a desk make sure it can link properly to Cubase so that when you move a fader Cubase follows it properly. If you don't need the hands-on of a desk then you will save money and desk space getting a standard type interface and then you use the mouse to move the faders in Cubase.

Also you're absolutely right Ivan to say budget for sound treatment and I'd also add to that proper monitor stands. The meter bridge, whilst popular in a lot of home and pro recording studios, isn't the best place to put your speakers. If you don't site your monitors properly in an adequately acoustic treated room you will not be able to hear the recording accurately enough and so won't be able to make informed mix decisions...


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