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> Imagining Before Playing
Daniel Realpe
post Sep 7 2010, 03:19 AM
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I was improvising a minute ago and realized that it feels so different to actually imagine what you are going to play before you play it, than just letting your hand go for a known scale randomly,

I just imagine a rhythm and then let go my fingers to whatever scale or group of notes over that previously imagined rhythm, and from then on I let new ideas flow at the moment the previous is being played, it's just fun!

Now this is the extreme:



But you can do this at any level, with any scale, like say, the pentatonic minor, just imagine a lick and then play it, then another and chain them,


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Mudbone
post Sep 7 2010, 05:24 AM
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Damn thats cool. I'm gonna have to start trying to imagine what I'm gonna play before I play it smile.gif

By the way, this guy has got a funny name if you think about it. The nickname for Richard in the US is Dick. With that being said, is there any other kind of "Bona"? laugh.gif


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maharzan
post Sep 7 2010, 06:07 AM
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truely talented.. not everyone can do this sort of thing. smile.gif


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Bogdan Radovic
post Sep 7 2010, 10:57 AM
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Imagining is a great tool for solo composing! Generally then you are not restricted to familiar fingerings/patterns etc.
Regarding this guy its an amazing video, especially when he does harmonizing in the end of the video wink.gif


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Vasilije Vukmiro...
post Sep 7 2010, 12:10 PM
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This guy is like Bobby McFerrin on bass! smile.gif
and voice.


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 7 2010, 04:04 PM
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QUOTE (Mudbone @ Sep 7 2010, 05:24 AM) *
Damn thats cool. I'm gonna have to start trying to imagine what I'm gonna play before I play it smile.gif

By the way, this guy has got a funny name if you think about it. The nickname for Richard in the US is Dick. With that being said, is there any other kind of "Bona"? laugh.gif

hahahaha


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Ben Higgins
post Sep 7 2010, 04:08 PM
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Daniel, that is a very valuable and interesting concept. I've actually been doing a similar thing lately to help me with alternate picking.

Over the years, I've had a lot of trouble attaining higher speeds and I've always had a very hard pick attack.. but I've reduced it down to an incredibly soft picking touch now... what I did whilst practising was focus on my left (fretting) hand so much to the point where I imagined I was 'leading' with my left hand.. not my right. I focused on my fretting hand to the point where I almost imagined my picking hand was doing nothing... this meant that I stopped focusing all my energy on my picking and that allowed all the tension to disappear.

Try it for yourselves ... when you 'over focus' on a body part.. you become more aware of it. And that's a hidden mistake I think we all make when practising a specific technique. Take the focus away from that body part and channel it elsewhere and it gives that body part the freedom to relax and become more 'loose'. Letting our hands find their natural groove in performing a task is the key ingredient. If we try and 'mould' it or 're-direct'' it with force and too much concentration.. that's when tension and frustration start to appear.

But yeah.. try leading with your fretting hands too and see how you find it - I'm really interested to hear what you guys think ! :-)


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 7 2010, 04:24 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 7 2010, 04:08 PM) *
Daniel, that is a very valuable and interesting concept. I've actually been doing a similar thing lately to help me with alternate picking.

Over the years, I've had a lot of trouble attaining higher speeds and I've always had a very hard pick attack.. but I've reduced it down to an incredibly soft picking touch now... what I did whilst practising was focus on my left (fretting) hand so much to the point where I imagined I was 'leading' with my left hand.. not my right. I focused on my fretting hand to the point where I almost imagined my picking hand was doing nothing... this meant that I stopped focusing all my energy on my picking and that allowed all the tension to disappear.

Try it for yourselves ... when you 'over focus' on a body part.. you become more aware of it. And that's a hidden mistake I think we all make when practising a specific technique. Take the focus away from that body part and channel it elsewhere and it gives that body part the freedom to relax and become more 'loose'. Letting our hands find their natural groove in performing a task is the key ingredient. If we try and 'mould' it or 're-direct'' it with force and too much concentration.. that's when tension and frustration start to appear.

But yeah.. try leading with your fretting hands too and see how you find it - I'm really interested to hear what you guys think ! :-)

yeah, I think that's a great thing to try. That's the whole point. We have to reach a point where the hand is on auto-mode. And I really think you don't need to be the greatest guitarist to start doing this. Just take a scale you really know on the guitar and let your hand freely move around that scale, but not only in on one direction but also doing jumps, and different rhythmic patterns,

This post has been edited by Daniel Realpe: Sep 7 2010, 04:25 PM


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Bear Rose
post Sep 7 2010, 06:07 PM
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That is a very interesting concept. I know Jimi Hendrix used to do the "singing what he was playing" technique sometimes, which is very cool. I think there's a big difference between making something sound good by playing it in a scale and making something sound exactly like you want it to. I guess it would be the same type concept as whistling. When you whistle, you aren't hitting notes in a scale, but you are producing the notes with your mouth that are in your mind. As guitarists, that would be a great skill to have and would really make guitar playing more natural and the instrument would me more an extension of you.

Its like changing from the guitar playing you to you playing the guitar.....if that makes sense to anyone huh.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 8 2010, 04:03 AM
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QUOTE (Bear Rose @ Sep 7 2010, 06:07 PM) *
That is a very interesting concept. I know Jimi Hendrix used to do the "singing what he was playing" technique sometimes, which is very cool. I think there's a big difference between making something sound good by playing it in a scale and making something sound exactly like you want it to. I guess it would be the same type concept as whistling. When you whistle, you aren't hitting notes in a scale, but you are producing the notes with your mouth that are in your mind. As guitarists, that would be a great skill to have and would really make guitar playing more natural and the instrument would me more an extension of you.

Its like changing from the guitar playing you to you playing the guitar.....if that makes sense to anyone huh.gif

Also the main songwriter in I. Maiden Steve Harris composes the vocals by whistling them over his bass lines,


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thefireball
post Sep 8 2010, 04:17 AM
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oh i imagine all the time...i just can't find what i'm hearing a lot of times.

you know...if i could play the extreme solos i hear in my head, people would fall over as dead men. laugh.gif
but seriously, i love imagining. i imagine solos all the time just for the heck of it - utterly awesome solos too - and then forget them the next minute! biggrin.gif

smile.gif


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Bogdan Radovic
post Sep 11 2010, 11:19 PM
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QUOTE (thefireball @ Sep 8 2010, 05:17 AM) *
oh i imagine all the time...i just can't find what i'm hearing a lot of times.

you know...if i could play the extreme solos i hear in my head, people would fall over as dead men. laugh.gif
but seriously, i love imagining. i imagine solos all the time just for the heck of it - utterly awesome solos too - and then forget them the next minute! biggrin.gif

smile.gif


Good practice would be to try to remember them and transcribe on guitar (from your head). I'm sure you would get awesome results. It may be hard at first but you'll be better at it the more you do it.


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 13 2010, 01:39 AM
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QUOTE (thefireball @ Sep 8 2010, 04:17 AM) *
oh i imagine all the time...i just can't find what i'm hearing a lot of times.

you know...if i could play the extreme solos i hear in my head, people would fall over as dead men. laugh.gif
but seriously, i love imagining. i imagine solos all the time just for the heck of it - utterly awesome solos too - and then forget them the next minute! biggrin.gif

smile.gif

hahaha, I do that sometimes too, and I know the feeling of falling short technically to make that solo real. sad.gif


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Mate Nagy
post Sep 13 2010, 04:06 PM
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That's definitely an intresting concept!
Moreover it is the main goal of imrpovisation in my opinion.
I started practicing it with a simple pentatonic scale. Iwas singing simple and short pentatonic lines and started to figure them out on the guitar.
Then I started to sing what I was thinking in my head and play it on the guitar at the same time.
After a few hours the result is amazing.
First choose only three notes from the pentatonic scale and get used to how they sound like and then improvise with those three notes only!
Then if you are comfortable with it, add more notes.
The whole pentatonic scale contains 5 notes. So if you practice it you will be able to improvise what you think in your had (in a pentatonic scale)
Then add more notes (the blue note for example) etc . . .
The success is guaranteed . . . wink.gif




QUOTE (Bear Rose @ Sep 7 2010, 07:07 PM) *
That is a very interesting concept. I know Jimi Hendrix used to do the "singing what he was playing" technique sometimes, which is very cool. I think there's a big difference between making something sound good by playing it in a scale and making something sound exactly like you want it to. I guess it would be the same type concept as whistling. When you whistle, you aren't hitting notes in a scale, but you are producing the notes with your mouth that are in your mind. As guitarists, that would be a great skill to have and would really make guitar playing more natural and the instrument would me more an extension of you.

Its like changing from the guitar playing you to you playing the guitar.....if that makes sense to anyone huh.gif

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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 13 2010, 04:49 PM
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QUOTE (Mate Nagy @ Sep 13 2010, 04:06 PM) *
That's definitely an intresting concept!
Moreover it is the main goal of imrpovisation in my opinion.
I started practicing it with a simple pentatonic scale. Iwas singing simple and short pentatonic lines and started to figure them out on the guitar.
Then I started to sing what I was thinking in my head and play it on the guitar at the same time.
After a few hours the result is amazing.
First choose only three notes from the pentatonic scale and get used to how they sound like and then improvise with those three notes only!
Then if you are comfortable with it, add more notes.
The whole pentatonic scale contains 5 notes. So if you practice it you will be able to improvise what you think in your had (in a pentatonic scale)
Then add more notes (the blue note for example) etc . . .
The success is guaranteed . . . wink.gif

yes, that's what I meant!


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Zsolt Galambos
post Sep 13 2010, 06:39 PM
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Great explanation, man! This is really the easiest and safest method of achieving the desired flow in improvisation. I often do the same, and I also compose lines with the same concept.



QUOTE (Mate Nagy @ Sep 13 2010, 05:06 PM) *
That's definitely an intresting concept!
Moreover it is the main goal of imrpovisation in my opinion.
I started practicing it with a simple pentatonic scale. Iwas singing simple and short pentatonic lines and started to figure them out on the guitar.
Then I started to sing what I was thinking in my head and play it on the guitar at the same time.
After a few hours the result is amazing.
First choose only three notes from the pentatonic scale and get used to how they sound like and then improvise with those three notes only!
Then if you are comfortable with it, add more notes.
The whole pentatonic scale contains 5 notes. So if you practice it you will be able to improvise what you think in your had (in a pentatonic scale)
Then add more notes (the blue note for example) etc . . .
The success is guaranteed . . . wink.gif



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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 21 2010, 12:18 AM
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Imagining is always cool method. After a while we can easily sing the scales and lines we are accustomed too, while we play them. These familiar lines stay memorized. But having more broader scale knowledge and practicing all kinds of different things, opens possibilities for imagining.


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 21 2010, 05:42 AM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Sep 21 2010, 12:18 AM) *
Imagining is always cool method. After a while we can easily sing the scales and lines we are accustomed too, while we play them. These familiar lines stay memorized. But having more broader scale knowledge and practicing all kinds of different things, opens possibilities for imagining.

yes, I think we are discussing here the root of all creation, so not an easy job


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