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> Improvisation
carminemarotta
post Sep 17 2010, 11:35 PM
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Hello
I would like to ask a question to all of you.
For the first time these days, I have started thinking about improvisation. Is it something really new for me, can some of you share some tips and tricks even on a theoretical level? Also, do you know if there are some good lessons on this topic? I did a search with the keyword improvisation but if some of you followed a particular lesson maybe it will be nice to know if it is suitable for someone who never thought about this concept

Thanks in advance

Carmine
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SirJamsalot
post Sep 18 2010, 12:14 AM
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Since I'm one of the people in "all of you", I'll respond - but I'm not a teacher, so let that be known smile.gif

Get yourself some backing tracks, and practice. start "in the box" so to speak - concentrate on only a few notes, paying close attention to intervals - the ability to know where one note is relative to another so that when you think you should be playing a 4th (for instance) from where you are at for that beat, you should be able to hit that note without having to "do the math". Kind of like typing - you do it so much, there comes a point where you're not even thinking about where the keys on the board are, your hands just start dictating what your mind is thinking.

Guitar improv is a lot more complicated than that, but that's one aspect of your playing you should be trying to achieve, and the only way to do that is to ... well... practice!

So get yourself some slow bluesy, or jazzy, or whatever your taste is, and start small, but be consistant - make it a regular part of your practice routine - 30 mins of improv after you've warmed up and done your scales, might be a good starting point. smile.gif

As for theory - my take on it is this - theory is good for studying, examining, and conveying to others what you just played or have to play for an upcoming gig/concert - but really, if you're trying to apply theory while you're playing, you're not going to have any room left in your mind to tell your hands to produce "feel"! smile.gif The feel comes from hearing the music, and then trying to fill the gaps with your intentions. That's where knowing your intervals comes into play - being able to hit that climactic note or notes, or buildup, or slowdown, or ... <insert your feel here>.

I left out vibrato and timing, but that should be a good start, IMHO.

Christian A.


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Vasilije Vukmiro...
post Sep 18 2010, 02:19 PM
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Best way to get into it is to learn minor scale and minor pentatonic scale! Also you need to know what is the tonality, assuming that you have progression over which you improvise... But most important is to explore the scale over backing track, let some notes last longer so you can know whether you're on right tracks. Later, when you get comfortable you will learn to play all arpeggios in given scale, but first thing first! smile.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 20 2010, 04:15 PM
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Singing is a good way to get used to improvise,

Try doing it with no instrument as accurately as possible, timing wise, and pitch wise,

That will help a lot,


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carminemarotta
post Sep 20 2010, 04:18 PM
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Thanks to all for the answers. I will follow your advices.

Carmine
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 20 2010, 10:04 PM
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To make yourself a good foundation for improvising, you should learn all 12 diatonic keys, starting from C major, learn pentatonic and diatonic scale, and chords that can be derived out of diatonic pattern. When you learn that, you can use scale notes to create melodies over given harmony. I recommend learning C major key in detail, and all 7 C major key chords. Then start practicing with these 7 chords, combine them, and try to make some melodies. Singing while playing will help greatly too.


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