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> Right Hand Placement
Right Hand Placement
For soloing and fast picking, what best describes your right hand positioning/placement
a) I anchor the wrist to a spot on the bridge. [ 10 ] ** [34.48%]
b) I allow the wrist to float lightly over, and mostly in contact with the bridge. [ 17 ] ** [58.62%]
c) I allow the wrist to float and mostly make sure to prevent it from touching the bridge. [ 2 ] ** [6.90%]
Total Votes: 29
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JamesT
post Sep 24 2010, 06:39 AM
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It's a little hard to tell by looking at all the videos. I've been experimenting with all 3 of the above ideas, and probably favor one over the other. (not going to say until the survey is done), but my picking isn't the model to study for sure.

For instructors, and experts, it would be great to hear from you your opinions as well as seeing the survey results. Share your thoughts please. cool.gif

This post has been edited by JamesT: Sep 24 2010, 06:40 AM


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jafomatic
post Sep 24 2010, 08:57 AM
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I'm neither instructor nor expert but my right hand technique seems pretty reliable. When I'm not strumming whole chords, then I stay in light contact with the bridge/strings and only increase pressure when I need to mute or palm-mute. If I am really jamming along, I will also occasion a light touch now and again with the pinky finger on whatever is nearby: the far end of the bridge pickup, 1st string (keeps it muted when the left hand is sloppily grazing across it to fret other strings), the body of the guitar, ... sometimes the volume pot :\

But really, the bridge area is getting scrubbed & thumped by my right hand quite often; dead skin & rust on the saddle screws tell most of the story.


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Jerry Arcidiacon...
post Sep 24 2010, 09:54 AM
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I use a pretty standard right hand position. For soloing I keep the side of my right hand over the bridge, where strings come out. With really small movement you can get PM sounds or not. Usually I anchor my pinky under the high E string or over the top, near the pots. If I need to strum or a more bassy sound without changing PU, I move my wrist away from the bridge.


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Daniel Realpe
post Sep 24 2010, 05:10 PM
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I voted 1, but sometimes I use the other options, it depends on the part.

I also have had periods on my life where I consciouslly have changed my right hand position. I remember I had a Greg Howe era, where I lifted the whole hand and didn't almost touch the bridge and always had my fist closed. It did have advantages.



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fkalich
post Sep 24 2010, 07:19 PM
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I did not know for sure, whether I sometimes held the palm fixed on the bridge or not. No, it floats. I don't see how anyone can play in the styles here in any other fashion. For example, how could you possibly sweep effectively without the palm floating on the bridge?

This post has been edited by fkalich: Sep 26 2010, 02:02 AM
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Todd Simpson
post Sep 24 2010, 07:55 PM
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It does vary depending on style/player/etc, but as I play a lot of heavy music, I tend to do a lot of string muting and so I'm usually really close to palm muting even if I"m not actually muting all the time. My hand tends to stay right at the bridge even when not muting. That way, when the need to mute comes along, I just drop by hand a bit.

Some players, like Stevie Ray Vaughn for example, have a much more free floating right hand. He seldom mutes anything. Eric claptop seems to place his hand behind the bridge by contrast. Still, anyone playing with genorous amounts of gain will become palm muting fan almost by default. Extra gain can easily turn in to extra noise, thus the need to become fluent with muting the strings you aren't playing so that the sympathetic vibrations the guitar creates don't make string noise become a problem.

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NoSkill
post Sep 24 2010, 10:49 PM
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My right hand has changed more, in the last year, than anything else. I think I'm using an open hand, unanchored, with light contact with the bridge in most instances. If I'm playing on a guitar with a Floyd, I tend to be more towards the neck with my muting so I don't lean on the Floyd.


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JamesT
post Sep 25 2010, 01:40 AM
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Great comments from everyone, and keep them coming. Votes too!

I've been thinking about this lately, cause for a few days in a row now, it has started to get comfortable just letting the hand float instead of anchoring it. Looking at the survey results so far, it looks as if there's no "right" way to do this, except the majority said what I kind of predicted "floating and allowing the hand to the bridge as needed". When I do this, it seems that my forearm muscles are used much more than when anchoring and it seems like it might even free me up for greater speeds. I'm sort of wondering if I should pursue really trying to "let it float" on AP runs.


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NoSkill
post Sep 25 2010, 02:13 AM
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The example of right hand, that I invariably go to, is Emir Hot. FYI...his hand looks relaxed and his technical skills are unarguable. Though you're correct, there are as many right hand positions as there are guitarists, I think in the intermediate skill level and below, we can all try and find ways of relaxing our playing and finding that pocket of maximum variability of dynamics with minimum complicating factors.


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thefireball
post Sep 25 2010, 02:25 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 24 2010, 01:55 PM) *
It does vary depending on style/player/etc, but as I play a lot of heavy music, I tend to do a lot of string muting and so I'm usually really close to palm muting even if I"m not actually muting all the time. My hand tends to stay right at the bridge even when not muting. That way, when the need to mute comes along, I just drop by hand a bit.


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Todd Simpson
post Sep 25 2010, 09:21 AM
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QUOTE (JamesT @ Sep 24 2010, 08:40 PM) *
Great comments from everyone, and keep them coming. Votes too!


The short answer is, "if it works for ya" smile.gif the longer answer is more involved. Here is an example of an alternate picking run done at speed. Notice my hand is planted at the bridge and I start UP, not muting, and after the first string, mute the rest. So yes, keeping the hand around that area is a good idea. We are going to work on this specific alternate picking run this saturday at 2:00 PM in the vid chat room and every saturday for that matter, join us!


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Sep 25 2010, 09:21 AM


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Praetorian
post Sep 25 2010, 05:17 PM
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I have found that when I first started, I would always have my right little finger touching the body of the guitar, keeping my hand centered over the strings. But, as I have been playing for a couple years now, I notice that its now mostly the heel of my palm that makes the most contact.


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zen
post Sep 25 2010, 11:35 PM
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The side of my palm rests on the strings between the bridge and the bridge pickup.


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Kristian Hyvarin...
post Sep 26 2010, 01:19 AM
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I don't care about my right hand placement. So long as it sounds good. smile.gif
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Vasilije Vukmiro...
post Sep 27 2010, 11:06 AM
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I play with my wrist on bridge, but sometimes using this floating technique, and it's really good, maybe the best...
Wrist is relaxed, you have more strength, more difficulties with control, but you can work on that,


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Bogdan Radovic
post Sep 30 2010, 12:38 PM
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I like the position where my hand is close to the bridge/slightly resting on it. Though every position has its benefits.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Oct 5 2010, 02:57 PM
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It's pretty hard to say where to keep the hand all the time, it's not always in the same place. It depends on what is being played. For faster stuff, it's good to have it anchored near the bridge with the side of the palm, and keep the movements precise. Sometimes you just want to loose your hand completely to accent the picking, so it needs to float. For palm muting, it needs to be near the bridge, for funk playing it needs to be completely loose and floating over the strings, with no contact to the strings etc..


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