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> My Guitar Playing Level
UncleGreg
post Oct 2 2010, 04:51 PM
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Hey... I've been playing for almost 3 years (in January) .. but been playing electric (and therefore lead guitar) for a year..
on GMC, I usually play at a difficulty level of between 3-5...
How badly do I suck?
I haven't had the chance to practice seriously during the past year.. so my guitar playing (especially lead guitar) pretty much sucks as far as technical skills are concerned..
What do you suggest I should work on to improve my lead guitar and my soloing skills?
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maharzan
post Oct 2 2010, 05:10 PM
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wow.. looks like you are posting it first time so how do we know how good/bad are you? Perhaps the best way would be to record your takes and post them into the REC thread. smile.gif


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UncleGreg
post Oct 2 2010, 05:14 PM
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QUOTE (maharzan @ Oct 2 2010, 04:10 PM) *
wow.. looks like you are posting it first time so how do we know how good/bad are you? Perhaps the best way would be to record your takes and post them into the REC thread. smile.gif


Haha I guess you're right.. yeah.. I haven't had the chance to use the forum just yet..
I'll start recording some things and will post them up when I get the chance. Thanks.
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maharzan
post Oct 2 2010, 05:55 PM
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Yea, you can upload in the Uploads forum as well so we can comment. REC threads can only be commented by instructors. smile.gif

Looking forward to your takes. When I joined GMC, I too had very hard time recording level 3 lessons. It just takes hard work and patience to get over them.. smile.gif


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thefireball
post Oct 2 2010, 07:18 PM
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QUOTE (UncleGreg @ Oct 2 2010, 10:51 AM) *
How badly do I suck?

laugh.gif


I think Maharzan has spoke well. smile.gif


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Azzaboi
post Oct 2 2010, 09:33 PM
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Thinking your bad at playing the guitar or even become worst then you use to think it was is actual a major stepping step in improving - it's the developing your of musical ear! Your playing skill remain the same.

I've went through the same and I'm sure a lot of guitarist have done the same. Unforunity rather than powering through it stops most and they don't come back until years later and then regret it. Your ear learns to pick at it note by note to clean, smooth and add feeling to it to create your own style of playing - wanting you to improve.

How many years you play doesn't mather, I strongly believe it's all about finding your weak areas and then working on them the most! But mix it up a bit, don't continuously do the same stuff or just play the only few song and exercise you know and can already do. Your'll find something you learn from one lesson will help you when you come back to something your've been struggling with. It finally clicks and something so hard at first becomes a lot more simpler. Ask a billion questions about everything, focus on one hand then the other, then ask a billion more questions!

Good luck and most importantly do it because you enjoy it!
You'll never wasting time on something you love to do - rock on!

I highly recommend working on minimising both hand movement, alternate picking and working on scales to help out with soloing. Get grip on palm muting and rhythm timing, that instantly changes you from sounding beginner to immediate/pro - this is important but ensure your not only using in rhythm playing and overlooking it in a solo (rushing or getting out of time doesn't sound to good). Add the electric techniques, hammer-on / pull-offs and then the more advance stuff. Put your own feeling into later, that makes something even simple, sound professional, copy at first then create your own best style of playing. Take it step-by-step, no need to rush, and always recheck the basics no matter the skill level. Destroy any bad habit before it occurs.

Palm Muting is the first key for sounding better on the electric guitar - you now have ampified power to tame!

This post has been edited by Azzaboi: Oct 2 2010, 10:10 PM


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stratman79
post Oct 2 2010, 10:07 PM
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It is really hard to say...

I personally don't think the video ratings are always equal...

Before I posted a reply I had a look at a few vids, for example the neoclassical etude (level 5) I would find hard work and would push me, whereas Nates SRV level 5 video I could do no problems...

Overall I reckon the Level 5 videos are about the same as Rockschool grade 7/8
Level 3 I would say are about grade 5/6 depending on the video.

So for 2 years of practise and a year of playing I say your doing pretty good.

IMO the level 4-6 videos are the most fun and musical 8+ I think becomes a technical exercise.
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Vasilije Vukmiro...
post Oct 3 2010, 12:33 PM
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It's good to have some kind of the practice routine that you would follow daily. What is the technique/issue that makes you most problems? Make it no.1 on your list. Also, write down all things that makes you problem. Maybe you have timing problems, can't play sweep picking, struggle to play some wide chords. Every day work on those issues, and also you must have some kind of a goal. Maybe it's song you want to learn, or particular GMC lesson you want to master.
And finally, use metronome, I can't emphasize how important is that! smile.gif


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SirJamsalot
post Oct 4 2010, 02:00 AM
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They say working with a metrinome is good. I say working with a backing track is best - you get the benefit of a metrinome AND the musical context you need to work within, which is what music is all about. So instead of doing scales to a metrinome, put together a drum / chord progression track that goes through various chord progressions and do your scales with that instead of a standard music-less metrinome click.

Also, jam to albums (I got that from Guthrie smile.gif

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emirb
post Oct 4 2010, 08:39 AM
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I agree with everyone here smile.gif I also find that GMC lessons (level)4-6 are most fun to play music-wise. 8+ are challenging and fun to master as it gives that kick of accomplishment (technique-wise). Jam to albums or backing track puts both timing on spot and developing phrasing and improvisation skills. I would say that phrasing/improvising is the most important thing for me.

Also as Vasilije said, which backs up stratman too, working on the 'real' weak spots is the key of progress. I can also play easily some stuff up to some relatively 'high' levels but some other that are of level 4-5 are still a LOT of problem. Simply because I've never play THAT particular style/technique. But time is all we've got smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 4 2010, 09:41 AM
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Some great replies wink.gif As was mentioned, it would be great if you could record your playing with a video camera or web cam and upload to youtube and embed here on GMC or link here so that we can see what your playing is like. This is a great place for guitar players and the instructors are all very helpful. So post early, post often and you will get some great feedback to get you over the hump.

Also, I do a mini-clinic every Saturday in the Video Chat Room where we work on Technique, Technique, Technique, and I've seen the students who come regularly make killer gains in a relatively short time. The lessons/techniques can be a bit intense at at times but they are meant to be. Growth takes work and above all, practice!

So start recording yourself to share and track progress, post more often and ask us more questions, and join us Saturday at 5:00 pm E.S.T in the chat room and before you know it you will be heading towards being the level of player you want to be.

Practice!
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Daniel Realpe
post Oct 5 2010, 09:14 PM
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do some videos and show both your strengths and things to work on.

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Giacinto
post Oct 5 2010, 10:00 PM
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QUOTE (Azzaboi @ Oct 2 2010, 08:33 PM) *
Thinking your bad at playing the guitar or even become worst then you use to think it was is actual a major stepping step in improving - it's the developing your of musical ear! Your playing skill remain the same.

I've went through the same and I'm sure a lot of guitarist have done the same. Unforunity rather than powering through it stops most and they don't come back until years later and then regret it. Your ear learns to pick at it note by note to clean, smooth and add feeling to it to create your own style of playing - wanting you to improve.

How many years you play doesn't mather, I strongly believe it's all about finding your weak areas and then working on them the most! But mix it up a bit, don't continuously do the same stuff or just play the only few song and exercise you know and can already do. Your'll find something you learn from one lesson will help you when you come back to something your've been struggling with. It finally clicks and something so hard at first becomes a lot more simpler. Ask a billion questions about everything, focus on one hand then the other, then ask a billion more questions!

Good luck and most importantly do it because you enjoy it!
You'll never wasting time on something you love to do - rock on!

I highly recommend working on minimising both hand movement, alternate picking and working on scales to help out with soloing. Get grip on palm muting and rhythm timing, that instantly changes you from sounding beginner to immediate/pro - this is important but ensure your not only using in rhythm playing and overlooking it in a solo (rushing or getting out of time doesn't sound to good). Add the electric techniques, hammer-on / pull-offs and then the more advance stuff. Put your own feeling into later, that makes something even simple, sound professional, copy at first then create your own best style of playing. Take it step-by-step, no need to rush, and always recheck the basics no matter the skill level. Destroy any bad habit before it occurs.

Palm Muting is the first key for sounding better on the electric guitar - you now have ampified power to tame!


wow. laugh.gif
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Azzaboi
post Oct 5 2010, 11:38 PM
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Is that a good wow or a 'joke laughing' bad wow? I might of rambled a bit, should write a novel.

Seriously, one stage in my life, I woke to play the guitar... thought this is utter crap, I'm sure I was a better player before. According to my family and friends I was playing the same. I was doing the same old stuff ever day and wasn't improving, sounding average. I don't settle for average! Guitar playing level is never a flat line, you might excel at one thing and suck at another, people avoid what they suck at but only when you work on the areas you suck at will you improve.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Oct 13 2010, 05:05 PM
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It's perfectly normal to feel that you are not that good at guitar, this feeling can motivate us to become better and better, and we all feel it here and there. You are starting to learn to play guitar, and you shouldn't be too concerned about your playing level. The important thing is to practice and be able to play what you like - this way you will find joy in music and your playing. Future of your playing and playing level you will achieve is always something that is uncertain - you will never know exactly how your playing is going to look like in 5-10 years. But you just need to practice and learn music theory so you can understand music better.

What I recommend that you start from learning some basic patterns/scales. If you haven't mastered the pentatonic scale boxes - do it. It's a good foundation. After that, lot of players usually get stuck with knowing pentatonic boxes and certain amount of licks, but can't quite figure out how to create a stronger bond with the harmony. If you came to this point, I always like to recommend some theory reading, specially about diatonic scale, chords, arpeggios, major keys, circle of fifths, all the basic theory. Then, some chord workouts can come into place in order to create the feel for strong notes within patterns. This can be one way of learning things of course, you can find your own way that suits you.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask, we are all learning here from each other.


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