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> How Do You Study Scales?
MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 29 2010, 03:51 PM
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requests back up!

i wanna know how do you guys study scales?
cuz i simple don't know tongue.gif, i understand the theory but i have a quit hard time putting on practice in the guitar


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dark dude
post Nov 29 2010, 04:06 PM
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Learn each box shape.
Play up and down each individual box shape.
Play up one shape, down the next shape (i.e. create variations to test whether I know the scale well enough or not).
Learn how to play the scale horizontally rather than vertically (boxes).
Put more notes on a string by adding tapping, further testing my knowledge of the scale.
Practice over a backing track.

It'll be very boring at first, but once you know a few notes and play over a backing track, it's way more motivational.
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MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 29 2010, 04:08 PM
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QUOTE (dark dude @ Nov 29 2010, 03:06 PM) *
Learn each box shape.
Play up and down each individual box shape.
Play up one shape, down the next shape (i.e. create variations to test whether I know the scale well enough or not).
Learn how to play the scale horizontally rather than vertically (boxes).
Put more notes on a string by adding tapping, further testing my knowledge of the scale.
Practice over a backing track.

It'll be very boring at first, but once you know a few notes and play over a backing track, it's way more motivational.


awwww ._. i hate boring stuff but ty guess i just need to nop give up the boring part


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dark dude
post Nov 29 2010, 04:13 PM
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Yeah man, sucks.

Learn one box, then play over a backing track. When you think you have it memorised, do the next box, etc. Once you start getting really frustrated (this doesn't mean give up straight away!), stop and come back to it later.


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Sollesnes
post Nov 29 2010, 05:22 PM
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Sing them, learn what makes them different from a major or minor scale (like for example lydian is a major scale with a #4) and improvise with them smile.gif
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MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 29 2010, 05:30 PM
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QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Nov 29 2010, 04:22 PM) *
Sing them, learn what makes them different from a major or minor scale (like for example lydian is a major scale with a #4) and improvise with them smile.gif



yep i know that the theorical stuff q: find it hard is putting on guitar but like dark dude said i think i just need to waste a few times in that "bored part"


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Nielzsz
post Nov 29 2010, 10:16 PM
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Here is a great website to look up Scales biggrin.gif has also some fun jam tracks.

www.chordbook.com


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MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 29 2010, 10:21 PM
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QUOTE (Nielzsz @ Nov 29 2010, 09:16 PM) *
Here is a great website to look up Scales biggrin.gif has also some fun jam tracks.

www.chordbook.com



Wow ty Nielzsz gonna make it usefull wink.gif cool.gif


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Nielzsz
post Nov 29 2010, 10:25 PM
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QUOTE (MonkeyDAthos @ Nov 29 2010, 10:21 PM) *
Wow ty Nielzsz gonna make it usefull wink.gif cool.gif


Glad to help biggrin.gif


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Mudbone
post Nov 30 2010, 12:08 AM
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I never liked the idea of boxes, it just seems mentally limiting. I came up with another way of learning scales (E minor to be precise), although I wouldn't be surprised if someone else came up with the same idea.

I actually wrote a song to learn the E minor scale, and if you have Guitar Pro or a similar program, you can do the same. And keep in mind, if you learn the E minor scale, you also learn the G major scale, because they're the same notes, just different root.

I'll attach the song below, but here is just an idea of how you can do it:

e|--------------------------------------
b|--------------------------------------
g|--------------------------------------
d|--------------------------------------
a|------7-9-----5-7------3-5-----2-3
e|-0-0-----0-0------0-0------0-0----

Notice when you play this you just descend down the notes of the E minor scale on the A string, starting from E on the 7th fret. And while you're playing this descending pattern, you're pedaling the E on the low E string. Whats important when you're doing this is to remember where the root note is, which would be E of course. You can make up any pattern you like, just as long as it goes up and down the neck and you hit all the notes of the scale. Once you got that down, just remember where the G is as well and you'll now know the E minor and G major scale. You will also know two modes, but that will just confuse you now, so don't worry about it at the moment.

Here is the song, the first one is the tabs, and the second one is an mp3 that the groovy Todd Simpson added drums to. You should probably listen to the second one first, just so you can hear what it sounds like in a song context.

Just a disclaimer, I can play the main riffs, but the harmonized parts I'm still struggling with. So if it looks difficult, it is tongue.gif At least to me it is biggrin.gif

Attached File  Harmonic_Sunrise___tuned_down_half_step.gp5 ( 18.08K ) Number of downloads: 50


Attached File  MudboneWithRandomDrums.mp3 ( 4.46MB ) Number of downloads: 259



This post has been edited by Mudbone: Nov 30 2010, 12:14 AM


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Sollesnes
post Nov 30 2010, 12:27 AM
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I agree. I find boxes more limited then anything smile.gif
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MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 30 2010, 12:41 AM
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QUOTE (Mudbone @ Nov 29 2010, 11:08 PM) *
I never liked the idea of boxes, it just seems mentally limiting. I came up with another way of learning scales (E minor to be precise), although I wouldn't be surprised if someone else came up with the same idea.

I actually wrote a song to learn the E minor scale, and if you have Guitar Pro or a similar program, you can do the same. And keep in mind, if you learn the E minor scale, you also learn the G major scale, because they're the same notes, just different root.

I'll attach the song below, but here is just an idea of how you can do it:

e|--------------------------------------
b|--------------------------------------
g|--------------------------------------
d|--------------------------------------
a|------7-9-----5-7------3-5-----2-3
e|-0-0-----0-0------0-0------0-0----

Notice when you play this you just descend down the notes of the E minor scale on the A string, starting from E on the 7th fret. And while you're playing this descending pattern, you're pedaling the E on the low E string. Whats important when you're doing this is to remember where the root note is, which would be E of course. You can make up any pattern you like, just as long as it goes up and down the neck and you hit all the notes of the scale. Once you got that down, just remember where the G is as well and you'll now know the E minor and G major scale. You will also know two modes, but that will just confuse you now, so don't worry about it at the moment.

Here is the song, the first one is the tabs, and the second one is an mp3 that the groovy Todd Simpson added drums to. You should probably listen to the second one first, just so you can hear what it sounds like in a song context.

Just a disclaimer, I can play the main riffs, but the harmonized parts I'm still struggling with. So if it looks difficult, it is tongue.gif At least to me it is biggrin.gif

Attached File  Harmonic_Sunrise___tuned_down_half_step.gp5 ( 18.08K ) Number of downloads: 50


Attached File  MudboneWithRandomDrums.mp3 ( 4.46MB ) Number of downloads: 259




ty mudbone biggrin.gif cool song cool.gif


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It's a proven fact that guitar faces have a bigger impact on tone than wood does.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Nov 30 2010, 01:15 AM
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Boxes may seem limiting, but it's just another approach that needs to be handled when practicing scales. 5 boxes of the CAGED system can be applied to not only scales but chords and arpeggios, so it's essential to know them.

If you want to learn specific scale, let us know, and we can generate some patterns that you can use.


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MonkeyDAthos
post Nov 30 2010, 01:31 AM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Nov 30 2010, 12:15 AM) *
Boxes may seem limiting, but it's just another approach that needs to be handled when practicing scales. 5 boxes of the CAGED system can be applied to not only scales but chords and arpeggios, so it's essential to know them.

If you want to learn specific scale, let us know, and we can generate some patterns that you can use.



i was thinking on starting to study the narutal minor scale : don't know where to start... i think im going learn some boxes tongue.gif


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