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> Creating A Solo, Share your tricks!
Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 11 2011, 12:08 PM
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Check out Lian's new lesson, "4 Solo Tricks", and the post a response to today's question. What are the most important things you consider when creating a solo?


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Ben Higgins
post Jan 11 2011, 12:41 PM
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I think Lian already covered it in his written section to the lesson, haha !! tongue.gif At least for me anyway..

I definitely believe in the importance of a good chord progression. When you have a great chord progression, the less you need to do to make it sound good. A few choice notes from the chords or scale... you can't really mess it up. Then you can add to it.

I also agree with Lian on using what you already have in your technique arsenal. Play to your strengths... now is not the time to try and introduce something that you haven't mastered. wink.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Jan 11 2011, 02:46 PM
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I got a 404 on that link sad.gif But I have to agree with Ben that Chord Progressions are key to working out solos. As solos don't usually happen in a vacuum so to speak, the notes that they are playing against give them context and meaning. So creating a nice chord progression to solo over is very important. Improving over chord progressions is a great way to work up your chops and to practice linking them together. The act of creating chord progressions to solo over is also it's own art involving music theory and gut response. If you want to work on your Minor Scale soloing, you might want to create a progression based on the minor scale at first. Etc.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 12 2011, 01:47 AM
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Good solo has to be melodic, catchy, provoke interest, keep attention. Oh, did I mention it has to be super cool? rolleyes.gif cool.gif


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 12 2011, 09:34 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jan 11 2011, 02:46 PM) *
I got a 404 on that link sad.gif But I have to agree with Ben that Chord Progressions are key to working out solos. As solos don't usually happen in a vacuum so to speak, the notes that they are playing against give them context and meaning. So creating a nice chord progression to solo over is very important. Improving over chord progressions is a great way to work up your chops and to practice linking them together. The act of creating chord progressions to solo over is also it's own art involving music theory and gut response. If you want to work on your Minor Scale soloing, you might want to create a progression based on the minor scale at first. Etc.


Oops - link fixed!

And to me - melody and dynamics is what creates a cool solo. I like it when a solo starts gently and then goes absolutely furious!


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Zsolt Galambos
post Jan 13 2011, 01:53 PM
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It's great when you have a cool chord progression, because your job is only to follow the lines. The difficult part comes when you have a not-so-obvious chord progression, say Am, Am, F, G. That's where the difficult part comes in. I acutally found out that sometimes it can be difficult to create great melodies and to make the chord progression really interesting. I personally would start out with a melody and then put some exotic soundig scales in it to make it sound more interesting smile.gif When I write a solo, I also like to invent new licks that probably hasn't been played before.


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Daniel Realpe
post Jan 14 2011, 02:51 AM
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I think phrases are quite important

I was thinking about this solo when I saw this thread biggrin.gif

3:19



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Stephane Lucarel...
post Jan 18 2011, 09:24 PM
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Try to sing the solo, the phrases and everything should become more melodic.


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