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> Pickup Screw Wont Stay In The Wood
Sagie
post Jan 15 2011, 09:14 AM
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hi gmc users

can you please help me out.

i have done this many times but i just bought a new ibanez rg1570 prestige.
i was adjusting the height of the pickups by turning the screws.

one screw on the neck pick up just does not stay in.
i can pull it out and push it in the wood easily.

the hole where the screw goes in is now bigger than it should be and the screw doesn't work.

now the pickup doesnt go in or out just stays loose and i would like to have it tightened and secured.

thanks!!!
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Sollesnes
post Jan 15 2011, 10:26 AM
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Go back to the store, and they will fix it or give you a new one smile.gif
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 15 2011, 07:45 PM
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I cannot tell for sure because I didn't have that particular model of guitar. But I found the pic, I hope this is the one?



If these screws are going directly into the wood, and the wood hole is bigger now, you can use this method to fix things. It's a common luthier method for wood holes:

- take a toothpick
- shorten the toothpick so it can fit the whole hole
- dip the toothpick into some wood glue (could be paper glue or some kind of easy glue). don't put super glue or industrial glue, you won't be able to pull the screw later.
- place the toothpick into the whole
- now put the screw in

This post has been edited by Ivan Milenkovic: Jan 15 2011, 07:46 PM


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fkalich
post Jan 16 2011, 03:42 AM
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I second this, it is how an expert would fix it. Toothpicks are hard wood. I just repaired something for my sister using this technique.

With screws generally, you just turn it to snug point and stop there. Some people really try to over tighten them, you strip them that way.

QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Jan 15 2011, 12:45 PM) *
I cannot tell for sure because I didn't have that particular model of guitar. But I found the pic, I hope this is the one?



If these screws are going directly into the wood, and the wood hole is bigger now, you can use this method to fix things. It's a common luthier method for wood holes:

- take a toothpick
- shorten the toothpick so it can fit the whole hole
- dip the toothpick into some wood glue (could be paper glue or some kind of easy glue). don't put super glue or industrial glue, you won't be able to pull the screw later.
- place the toothpick into the whole
- now put the screw in

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MickeM
post Jan 16 2011, 10:39 AM
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I third that. smile.gif

The most rescent repair I made was with toothpicks. I was replacing machine heads and their holes sat a bit off compared to the current ones.
Cut the pointy end of the toothpick, add some glue and plug the hole. Break it in line with the surface and sand it smooth. Let it dry before you
Simple ans swift.

Or you get padding to fill the hole, they are usually harder than the wood after they dry so a pillar drill is to prefeer since a hand drill can sliip over to the wood side when you're making new holes.


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Sollesnes
post Jan 16 2011, 11:35 AM
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Doing that on a new guitar would make you lose the "insurance" though or what it is called in english. The shop wont take responsibility for any other things that might be wrong with the guitar.
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MickeM
post Jan 16 2011, 02:18 PM
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QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Jan 16 2011, 11:35 AM) *
Doing that on a new guitar would make you lose the "insurance" though or what it is called in english. The shop wont take responsibility for any other things that might be wrong with the guitar.

Yeah. I missed the part about it was new. Ofc it goes back to the shop first as a warranty fix if it's faulty.


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Sean_1234
post Jan 16 2011, 07:44 PM
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Toothpick works. The way to do this without the glue for me was to slice the toothpick in several layers of wood. Then just put them in the hole, covering the insides of the hole. then screw the screw into place wink.gif
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thefireball
post Jan 16 2011, 09:29 PM
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This is good to know. smile.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 16 2011, 11:12 PM
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QUOTE (Sean_1234 @ Jan 16 2011, 07:44 PM) *
Toothpick works. The way to do this without the glue for me was to slice the toothpick in several layers of wood. Then just put them in the hole, covering the insides of the hole. then screw the screw into place wink.gif


Yes, the method without the glue can work as well, using this method (filling the whole hole). It worked for me on smaller holes that needed this fix (although I didn't chop the toothpick, it snugged into the hole filling it nicely). Thanks for this method as well! smile.gif


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