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> Just A Quick Question?
Sickz666
post Jan 19 2011, 03:13 PM
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just a quick question , there are 7 notes in a scale ..each note represent a mode ( g major , a dorian etc ).
Am i correct that diffrent type of modes are "represented" by diffrent kind of chords? smile.gif
So if im playing a g major scale , we have the note g - thats a g major chord.
We have e minor mode - e minor chord.
What kind of chords to the other modes represent? Sus2? Add9?
Or am i just plain stupid? tongue.gif
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dark dude
post Jan 19 2011, 03:37 PM
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The short answer: The chords that fit into the mode, "represent" that mode. There are many chords that "represent" each mode.

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The longer answer: tongue.gif
There are 7 notes in the major scale (this can change; there are only 5 in the pentatonic scale). Modes are formed from the major scale. If you start on the first note of G major, G, you'll be playing the ionian mode (the major scale and ionian mode have the same structure), the second note, the next mode and so on. The minor scale has the same notes as the aeolian mode.

Back to your question, a G major chord would fit with the G major scale very well. This also applies to the E minor example you gave. This is primarily because the notes in those chords are formed from the scale.

The chords you can construct are limited by the notes you're allowed to use (unless you want to throw theory away and use notes outside of the guidelines, which sometimes works!). This is illustrated here: http://www.zentao.com/guitar/modes/modes-4.html, focus on the chord table. So, a triad in the ionian would be major, in the dorian it would be minor, phrygian it would be minor. There are many examples there!

As I mentioned, these are just guidelines that musical theory gives us. Don't be afraid to experiment and use other notes.

This post has been edited by dark dude: Jan 19 2011, 03:40 PM


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Sickz666
post Jan 19 2011, 03:43 PM
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QUOTE (dark dude @ Jan 19 2011, 03:37 PM) *
The short answer: The chords that fit into the mode, "represent" that mode. There are many chords that "represent" each mode.

---

The longer answer: tongue.gif
There are 7 notes in the major scale (this can change; there are only 5 in the pentatonic scale). Modes are formed from the major scale. If you start on the first note of G major, G, you'll be playing the ionian mode (the major scale and ionian mode have the same structure), the second note, the next mode and so on. The minor scale has the same notes as the aeolian mode.

Back to your question, a G major chord would fit with the G major scale very well. This also applies to the E minor example you gave. This is primarily because the notes in those chords are formed from the scale.

The chords you can construct are limited by the notes you're allowed to use (unless you want to throw theory away and use notes outside of the guidelines, which sometimes works!). This is illustrated here: http://www.zentao.com/guitar/modes/modes-4.html, focus on the chord table. So, a triad in the ionian would be major, in the dorian it would be minor, phrygian it would be minor. There are many examples there!

As I mentioned, these are just guidelines that musical theory gives us. Don't be afraid to experiment and use other notes.


Thanks alot dude!
Helped alot , and god bless you for that link laugh.gif
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 20 2011, 12:39 PM
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That's the whole point actually smile.gif

7 notes, each note creates mode, each mode creates chord.

chords are derived out of I, III and V note of each mode, so start building them! smile.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Jan 21 2011, 04:22 AM
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Major and minor are two different modes. They can be called Ionion and Aeolian respectively.

There the other 5 modes. But I think a good idea is to really dig into these two very often used modes. And having that as a reference you can visualize all the others more easily.

For instance the fifth mode: Mixolydian is very similar to major. Or Dorian, the second is very similar to Minor mode.

So there you already have four modes.


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Sickz666
post Jan 21 2011, 03:48 PM
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The question more i was wondering was if the modes are related to any type of chord more , like Ionian (major) are related to a normal major chord, and Aeolian (minor) are related to a normal to a normal minor chord. Are the other modes related to any special chord like for example lydian , its diffrent from the Ionian by one note , is it a related to a more sus orr add9 chord more than a normal chord?

Sorry if im confuseing or annoying smile.gif
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