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> How Do We Train Our Ears?
Cosmin Lupu
post Jan 31 2011, 09:34 AM
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Hey everyone!

since I consider ear training as being one of the most important aspects of musicianship, I am curious to know how all of you are working out on improving your hearing skills! smile.gif

What do you find more relevant and useful: relative pitch training or perfect pitch training?

I am very interested in your vision and perspective on this matter!

Cosmin


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Daniel Realpe
post Jan 31 2011, 02:54 PM
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I agree it's so important for any musician,

Myself I used a piece of software called Ear Master Pro, which can really cover a lot of stuff in this field. Also I practiced with my mates the chord progressions and 7th 9th chords.

And learn solos by ear


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 31 2011, 06:01 PM
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I'm not dedicating any special time to ear training, I develop ear as I practice. Like to sing my phrases, and got a pretty good brain-finger connection on the majority of mine pentatonic, diatonic and harmonic scale licks. Not all, but most of them are engraved in my head and can be connected any way I want.
I tried Ear Master School 5, but I don't have that state of mind to work with those software.


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Bear Rose
post Feb 1 2011, 04:41 PM
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I do it similar to the way Ivan does. I've developed my ear over the course of time as I practice and learn new songs, and especially when playing with other people on different instruments. I've gotten pretty good at picking up songs by ear as long as they are ionian or aeolian, but if a song is in another mode than that, I'm toast huh.gif


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Fre
post Feb 1 2011, 07:00 PM
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If you really want to focus on the ear training, this could help!
I already helped me alot! Ex-instructor Pedja showed me this great training. But I think, as time goes by, your ear develops and knows the scales/intervals you play/use. Just like Ivan and Bear said.
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HungryForHeaven
post Feb 1 2011, 07:03 PM
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I don't really see the point in practicing perfect pitch, you either have it or you don't. (I definitely don't!)

On the other hand, it is very useful to have a sense of relative pitch. If I know in my head the relative pitch of the next note or next few notes compared to the current note, I like to be able to play it/them without actually knowing which key I'm in. I'm not saying it useless to know where on the fretboard to find a particular note, that's another story.

I sometimes spend a while at this site for ear training; it has intervals and chords, scales/modes, as well as some purely theoretical stuff (written rather than played).

QUOTE (Fre @ Feb 1 2011, 07:00 PM) *
If you really want to focus on the ear training, this could help!
I already helped me alot! Ex-instructor Pedja showed me this great training. But I think, as time goes by, your ear develops and knows the scales/intervals you play/use. Just like Ivan and Bear said.


Hehe, you were faster on that one!
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superize
post Feb 1 2011, 07:06 PM
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I am prettey lazy with this but when i listen to music i try to listen active and really try to hear the chord changes and what they are playing


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Sickz666
post Feb 1 2011, 07:30 PM
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QUOTE (HungryForHeaven @ Feb 1 2011, 07:03 PM) *
I don't really see the point in practicing perfect pitch, you either have it or you don't. (I definitely don't!)

On the other hand, it is very useful to have a sense of relative pitch. If I know in my head the relative pitch of the next note or next few notes compared to the current note, I like to be able to play it/them without actually knowing which key I'm in. I'm not saying it useless to know where on the fretboard to find a particular note, that's another story.

I sometimes spend a while at this site for ear training; it has intervals and chords, scales/modes, as well as some purely theoretical stuff (written rather than played).



Hehe, you were faster on that one!


Man i love you for that link!
Ear training to me is important , although i havent had much time for it yet. :/
On the other hand , i spend much time in the summer on caravan trips.
This time around ill bring my acoustic for training and my mac for ear training.

Another good website for ear training and theory is : http://www.musictheory.net/
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Sollesnes
post Feb 1 2011, 07:39 PM
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QUOTE (HungryForHeaven @ Feb 1 2011, 07:03 PM) *
I don't really see the point in practicing perfect pitch, you either have it or you don't. (I definitely don't!)


That's not how it works. Anyone can get perfect pitch, unless you are tone deaf, which means you can't distinguish tones a semitone apart. If you can distinguish semitones, then you can get perfect pitch. smile.gif

But certaintly, I agree that relative pitch is more useful than perfect pitch smile.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 2 2011, 09:19 AM
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QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Feb 1 2011, 06:39 PM) *
That's not how it works. Anyone can get perfect pitch, unless you are tone deaf, which means you can't distinguish tones a semitone apart. If you can distinguish semitones, then you can get perfect pitch. smile.gif

But certaintly, I agree that relative pitch is more useful than perfect pitch smile.gif


I do agree with the fact that you can get perfect pitch, by practicing it - it is not just a God given gift smile.gif

I've used David Lucas Burge's method for Relative Pitch training - it very useful and well structured so i would recommend it to anyone who would like to take it step by step and understand things smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Feb 2 2011, 10:08 AM
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Great topic... I'm like Ivan and Bear in that I don't dedicate any time to learning it. I naturally developed it as soon as I started trying to figure out songs. I basically did it by applying the basic power chord shape to every song I wanted to figure out. I'd move the shape all around the neck until I got the right chord, or something close.

Eventually, I had certain chord progressions visualised in my head so if I heard a particular chord progression eg. A - C - D.. I can literally see it in my head before I play it. From that point I could work out most things. If I hear a riff on the radio 99% of the time I can figure it out in my head without touching a guitar because I know what the intervals sound like.. I guess you'd call it relative pitch ?


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Vinod Saranga
post Feb 2 2011, 12:06 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 2 2011, 02:38 PM) *
Eventually, I had certain chord progressions visualised in my head so if I heard a particular chord progression eg. A - C - D.. I can literally see it in my head before I play it. From that point I could work out most things. If I hear a riff on the radio 99% of the time I can figure it out in my head without touching a guitar because I know what the intervals sound like.. I guess you'd call it relative pitch ?


Great tip Ben
I've used it too.


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Jerry Arcidiacon...
post Feb 2 2011, 12:46 PM
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Software can help, of course but if you sing everything you play, licks, scales, intervals, it's a good start-point.


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