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Nava
post Feb 21 2011, 09:50 AM
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About practice biggrin.gif

I'm just curious and thinking about practice time..
How mcuh do you really practice and what are ur goals? No matter if u just a hobbyplayer, beginner or fulltime player.

Me myself joined about hmm...say 6 weeks ago and I try to play atleast 1 to 2 hours a day. Got a work and a house so its pretty much to handle between practicing:) And a girlfriend who does'nt want to be neglected rolleyes.gif
So focus on what I practice is very important to me and for a month now I have played Modal Madness and it has become a bit of a poison and I cant play anything else before I have gone through that for half an hour:)

My goal is to become a faster player in AP and vibrato and to find harmonic melodies. I love to make songs and would be nice to record it someday. My problem is that I am to much of a perfectionist:) I hate when I cant play it exactly the way it should...

So my practice time is about 1-2 hours/day and goal is to be a better allround player/soloist.

Looking forward to read your story and get more inspiration cool.gif

// Thomas


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Ben Higgins
post Feb 21 2011, 10:25 AM
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Hi Thomas,

I think your approach is very good... using your practice time to focus on a few aspects that you want to improve instead of random noodling is the most efficient way to progress.

My current approach is similar to yours. I focus on perfect repetition at manageable speeds to ingrain good form and muscle memory. I also take frequent brakes to just relax and breathe.. I don't allow my muscles to get too tired so they can't carry on. I also practice stood up and pay particular attention to making sure my shoulders are as relaxed as possible.

I have a few different AP licks and an economy picking lick that I run through... and I'll run through any lessons that I'm currently working on too.

I don't play for that long... I play for only as long as I can focus for. I believe in quality not quantity. smile.gif



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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 21 2011, 10:42 AM
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QUOTE (Nava @ Feb 21 2011, 08:50 AM) *
About practice biggrin.gif

I'm just curious and thinking about practice time..
How mcuh do you really practice and what are ur goals? No matter if u just a hobbyplayer, beginner or fulltime player.

Me myself joined about hmm...say 6 weeks ago and I try to play atleast 1 to 2 hours a day. Got a work and a house so its pretty much to handle between practicing:) And a girlfriend who does'nt want to be neglected rolleyes.gif
So focus on what I practice is very important to me and for a month now I have played Modal Madness and it has become a bit of a poison and I cant play anything else before I have gone through that for half an hour:)

My goal is to become a faster player in AP and vibrato and to find harmonic melodies. I love to make songs and would be nice to record it someday. My problem is that I am to much of a perfectionist:) I hate when I cant play it exactly the way it should...

So my practice time is about 1-2 hours/day and goal is to be a better allround player/soloist.

Looking forward to read your story and get more inspiration cool.gif

// Thomas



Hey there Thomas,

being a perfectionist is a very good thing, we have an old saying in my country: "It is better to measure 10 times and cut only once" smile.gif
2 hours a day spent wisely could boost your playing to great levels, with one condition: you have to have to know what you want in exact terms and then study things in small bits of information, putting them together and in a context.

Don't mix things - focus on a few aspects each week, and at the week's end try to record what you've studied, in a musical context.
Iin my opinion, music has to be your final goal. If you study without being able to apply knowledge in a real context, your time is kind of wasted.

I'd be happy to give you more insight, so let me know if you find my words useful.

Cosmin


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Chris Evans
post Feb 21 2011, 11:12 AM
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Time is pretty much dedicated the same way as yours.

I also spend at least 1-2hrs a day, sometimes longer if I`m not too tired both mentally and physically, with this kind of regime its not too difficult to fit in with my everyday life of work, wife & daughter smile.gif

I tend to focus on certain areas that I want to improve, more recently I was a little lack lustre, the random noodling that Ben mentioned is quite easy to fall into, I`ve fixed that for the time being though with help from Ben, he`s kick started my enthusiasm and re focused me on proper practice smile.gif

smaller focused chunks of practice seem far more beneficial to me personally than hours and hours of random licks etc smile.gif


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Fran
post Feb 21 2011, 11:21 AM
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Lately I'm playing 1h a day, though I want to increase that time a bit. All for hobby and learning songs I like.


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thefireball
post Feb 21 2011, 04:58 PM
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I am able to practice several hours a day. Thankfully, I'm a single guy so I have much free time to myself. biggrin.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 21 2011, 05:12 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 21 2011, 09:25 AM) *
Hi Thomas,

I think your approach is very good... using your practice time to focus on a few aspects that you want to improve instead of random noodling is the most efficient way to progress.

My current approach is similar to yours. I focus on perfect repetition at manageable speeds to ingrain good form and muscle memory. I also take frequent brakes to just relax and breathe.. I don't allow my muscles to get too tired so they can't carry on. I also practice stood up and pay particular attention to making sure my shoulders are as relaxed as possible.

I have a few different AP licks and an economy picking lick that I run through... and I'll run through any lessons that I'm currently working on too.

I don't play for that long... I play for only as long as I can focus for. I believe in quality not quantity. smile.gif


Hehehe biggrin.gif " I believe in quality not quantity" so so so true! Thumbs up for Ben!


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allen lindstrom
post Feb 21 2011, 05:35 PM
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I think a lot of us are in a similar situation Thomas. Being able to play anytime of the day isn't a luxury easily afforded when you have to work 9-5.

I try to get in at least an hour a day on weekdays. I also try to get in a couple hours a day on weekends.

I also try not to play for longer than an hour at a time, especially when I'm learning something new. I feel like I'm 'cramming' if I play any longer than that in one sitting.
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Ben Higgins
post Feb 21 2011, 06:28 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 21 2011, 04:12 PM) *
Hehehe biggrin.gif " I believe in quality not quantity" so so so true! Thumbs up for Ben!


Haha, I was thinking the same about your 'measure 10 times' quote.. I've never heard it before and I love it. smile.gif Have yourself a donut !! tongue.gif


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Nava
post Feb 21 2011, 07:42 PM
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[quote name='Cosmin Lupu' date='Feb 21 2011, 10:42 AM' post='515622']

2 hours a day spent wisely could boost your playing to great levels, with one condition: you have to have to know what you want in exact terms and then study things in small bits of information, putting them together and in a context.

Don't mix things - focus on a few aspects each week, and at the week's end try to record what you've studied, in a musical context.
Iin my opinion, music has to be your final goal. If you study without being able to apply knowledge in a real context, your time is kind of wasted.

I'd be happy to give you more insight, so let me know if you find my words useful.

Cosmin


Yes, Cosmin:)
I really want to know more about the words: (you have to have to know what you want in exact terms and then study things in small bits of information, putting them together and in a context). I absolutely dont want to waste my playing time!
As I play the modal scales only (with a few other "nice to play" lessons) my intention is to really get it without thinking so much what I do when I play. Thats the main goal. And then get further with harmonic scale which is the BIG ahead goal biggrin.gif
But please share some more of what you mean:))

Its great to read all of your storys and it gives inspiration:))



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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 22 2011, 10:06 AM
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Hey man!

first of all, write down all your guitar playing goals, and try to classify them intro Rhythm, Lead, Harmony, Improvisation, Composition, Ear training.

Try and make up a study schedule that you should try and hold on to no matter what.

Here's mine (it's just an example, you don;t have to go through with it, step by step)

5 days a week, 4hrs/ day

1 hr of technique ( my favorites - alternate picking, hybrid picking, and soon, 8 finger tapping and slap guitar, which I love but have neglected for the past 2-3 years)

1 hr of phrasing (divided into styles - country, metal, funk..etc. which I try to understand from all perspectives, such as technique, harmony-melody relations, metrics and so on)

1 hr of composition (writing and orchestrating for my bands or for other people's projects, or sometimes just going through my songs in order to keep my finger memory up to date)

1 hr of improvising (choosing a backing track and trying to express myself the best I can, using what I have learned)


...this is aside from studio work or band rehearsals


It's getting very difficult to keep it up because of this thing called life smile.gif) but I'm trying my best smile.gif

I suggest you do the same, and try to make up a schedule that fits your exact needs and fits into your life.

As Ben said, "quality NOT quantity" makes the difference - it's better to tell a story with 3 notes than to say nothing with a 1000...and don't feel any frustration because you missed a day's study.

Maybe the time spent that day doing something else, taught you a valuable lesson or you had a great time with your family. Balance is everything in life, and those who achieve it, live happily ever after smile.gif just like in the stories.

And another thing, when it's you and your guitar, it should stay like that - no phone, no TV, no internet, no nothing! The power of true focus works wonders on human beings smile.gif


if i can assist you further, let me know.

cheerios

Cosmin


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Nava
post Feb 23 2011, 07:36 PM
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Thanks alot for the words of wisdom, Cosmin:)

So many things to handle! So I believe that u are a fulltime musician then? I envy u the opportunity to play so much and beeing so dedicated!
But yes, I will do a scedule that I will hold on to..
For starter I will practice the modal scales (for at least 30-45 min/day) and then I dont know biggrin.gif
Maybe some rythm training or arpeggios. I must think about it...
What do u believe is the best practice along with the modal scales?

Thx again for your answer, I really gonna focus on whatever I practice!


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Todd Simpson
post Feb 23 2011, 11:12 PM
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Some great advice so far wink.gif I am on the same one or two hour sched and try for more on weekends. For working up your AP I'd say join us for the Saturday Video Chat each week if at all possible as we spend a great deal of time on AP, Economic Picking, Speed, Technique, etc. We do other things as well, but we do work quite a bit on speed and technique.

Here is a link to the 40 or so lessons we have done so far. If you can chew through these, you won't be able to keep from getting better at alternate picking. Most are quite short and quick to learn, slower to master.

http://bit.ly/lessonnotes

Practice!
Todd

QUOTE (Nava @ Feb 23 2011, 01:36 PM) *
Thanks alot for the words of wisdom, Cosmin:)

So many things to handle! So I believe that u are a fulltime musician then? I envy u the opportunity to play so much and beeing so dedicated!
But yes, I will do a scedule that I will hold on to..
For starter I will practice the modal scales (for at least 30-45 min/day) and then I dont know biggrin.gif
Maybe some rythm training or arpeggios. I must think about it...
What do u believe is the best practice along with the modal scales?

Thx again for your answer, I really gonna focus on whatever I practice!



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Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 24 2011, 01:28 PM
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QUOTE (Nava @ Feb 23 2011, 06:36 PM) *
Thanks alot for the words of wisdom, Cosmin:)

So many things to handle! So I believe that u are a fulltime musician then? I envy u the opportunity to play so much and beeing so dedicated!
But yes, I will do a scedule that I will hold on to..
For starter I will practice the modal scales (for at least 30-45 min/day) and then I dont know biggrin.gif
Maybe some rythm training or arpeggios. I must think about it...
What do u believe is the best practice along with the modal scales?

Thx again for your answer, I really gonna focus on whatever I practice!


If you want to practice modal scales, I believe that you should first get your ears to know the modes, understand them, and be able to sing them with your voice against a certain chord or chord progression. Modes are not positions, modes have personality, uniqueness so to say.
smile.gif your ears are the MOST IMPORTANT musical weapons in your arsenal. Associate the sounds with notes and spell them out when you sing, that way you'll build up a very powerful skill in hearing notes and improvising in a conscious manner using your voice in a certain harmonic context.

try it biggrin.gif and let me know what it feels like

cheerios




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Nava
post Feb 24 2011, 06:23 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Feb 23 2011, 11:12 PM) *
Some great advice so far wink.gif I am on the same one or two hour sched and try for more on weekends. For working up your AP I'd say join us for the Saturday Video Chat each week if at all possible as we spend a great deal of time on AP, Economic Picking, Speed, Technique, etc. We do other things as well, but we do work quite a bit on speed and technique.

Here is a link to the 40 or so lessons we have done so far. If you can chew through these, you won't be able to keep from getting better at alternate picking. Most are quite short and quick to learn, slower to master.

http://bit.ly/lessonnotes

Practice!
Todd


Thx Todd:)
Looks great indeed! I'm stuck with Zsolts lessons right know and will be practicing it for 100 days more.
I see what I can do about ur video lessons..I'll try and check it out:)


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Nava
post Feb 24 2011, 07:29 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 24 2011, 01:28 PM) *
If you want to practice modal scales, I believe that you should first get your ears to know the modes, understand them, and be able to sing them with your voice against a certain chord or chord progression. Modes are not positions, modes have personality, uniqueness so to say.
smile.gif your ears are the MOST IMPORTANT musical weapons in your arsenal. Associate the sounds with notes and spell them out when you sing, that way you'll build up a very powerful skill in hearing notes and improvising in a conscious manner using your voice in a certain harmonic context.

try it biggrin.gif and let me know what it feels like

cheerios


Yes, when I write songs I try to find a melody in singing from just say 3 chords for example D, F#m and G...and chorus in maybe A, Bm and G..Then I use those 7-8 notes in the scale and try to laborate around with singing even octaves but its hard:)
I really lack in knowledge of playing scales and to find a way to express myself in the soul of vibrato, and some speed is what I really need. Imagine just to play without thinking and just let the fingers move itself smile.gif
Improvation.. I know what you mean and THAT is what I aim for!
I'll try and do it the way you suggest.

Many thanks:))

This post has been edited by Nava: Feb 24 2011, 07:30 PM


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