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> Dissonance, I want to learn more about it
thefireball
post May 20 2011, 01:52 AM
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I love dissonance in metal, but I don't really know what is involved behind the chords.

My favorite dissonant chord to throw in while playing an open drop tuning is 4th fret on the 2nd string, and 7th fret on the 3rd string. I would like to learn more about dissonance.

What is the theory behind it? Do dissonant chords have to be a half step apart only? Etc.

-Brandon


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Sollesnes
post May 20 2011, 02:10 AM
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Learn your intervals, dissonance depends on your song, and are in the eyes of the beholder. smile.gif
Intervals generally considered dissonant are minor and major second, minor and major seventh and the tritone. But how you place them in a chord progression, and how you place certain chords, can make big impacts smile.gif




This post has been edited by Sollesnes: May 20 2011, 02:18 AM
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thefireball
post May 20 2011, 03:49 AM
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I'm starting from ground level - chords. There's gotta be something I missed, even there. I'm rusty on theory and I really need to learn it. I'm starting now. Thanks. Maybe this will make sense as I go on. smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post May 20 2011, 08:32 AM
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This is a really interesting topic. Good answer from Sollesnes !

As he said, a lot of it will come down to your personal view on what sounds 'out' and what doesn't smile.gif I always thought the whole tone scale sounded crazy, as do augmented chords biggrin.gif

But apart from that, I guess I always think of semitones on adjacent strings to get that note 'bleeding into one another' sound smile.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post May 20 2011, 09:58 AM
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QUOTE (thefireball @ May 20 2011, 04:49 AM) *
I'm starting from ground level - chords. There's gotta be something I missed, even there. I'm rusty on theory and I really need to learn it. I'm starting now. Thanks. Maybe this will make sense as I go on. smile.gif


Ground level are intervals, and chords are constructed out of different intervals. The spacings between the notes build different voicings. Here are some facts about intervals:

As atoms are building bloks or matter, intervals are the building blocks of melody and harmony. A good definition of an interval is "the space between the notes". On the next example you can observe the list of basic intervals starting from C:
notes_interval names
C (root)
Db minor 2nd (half step)
D major 2nd (whole step)
Eb minor third
E major third
F perfect 4th
F#(or Gb) tritone (augmented 4th for F# or diminished 5th for Gb)
G perfect 5th
G# (Ab) augmented 5th for G# or minor 6th for Ab
A major 6th
A# (Bb) augmented 6th for A# or minor 7th for Bb
B major 7th
C octave

here are some very well known melodies that use common intervals for ear training:

interval - tunes
minor 2nd Theme from Jaws
major 2nd Happy Birthday
minor 3rd Chopin’s Funeral March
major 3rd Kum Ba Ya
perfect 4th Here Comes The Bride
tritone Theme from The Simpsons
perfect 5th Theme from Star Wars, Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
minor 6th The Entertainer (3rd to 4th note)
major 6th Nobody Knows The Trouble I’ve Seen (descending), NBC Theme
minor 7th Theme from the original Star Trek, Somewhere from West Side Story
major 7th Bali Hai (Up an octave, then down a half step)
octave Somewhere Over The Rainbow


Inverting intervals:

An important skill all musicians must have, especially when transposing is the ability to invert intervals. If you have to transpose a tune "up a major 6th" on the spot, you'll probably find it easier to transpose it "down a minor 3rd", which is the same thing. A 3rd is a lot closer than 6th. In other words, you need to know that a major 6th inverts to a minor 3rd. When you invert an interval, you take the bottom not and put it on top, or vice versa. The result is a new interval, and the rules for inverting intervals are simple.

When you invert an interval:

- Major becomes minor
- Minor becomes major
- Perfect remains perfect
- Tritone remains tritone (augmented becomes diminished and vice versa)

- the old and new intervals add up to nine

For example:

1. If you invert a major 3rd of C (that would be E) it becomes E with C on top, a minor 6th. Major becomes minor, and three plus six add up to nine.
2. If you invert minor 2nd it becomes major 7th. Minor becomes major and two plus seven add up to nine.

To really learn the intervals properly, you should sing them as part of your daily practice routine. You don't need guitar to do this (unless you're a singer), so you can practice in the shower, in the card etc.
In addition, practice singing along with your favorite records, melodies, solos etc. You have to train your ear like this because a good solo consists largely of playing on gutiar what you hear in your head.


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Daniel Realpe
post May 20 2011, 02:52 PM
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It's true that it depends on the context. Even a major chord can sound "out" played inside an atonal context.

Experiment with all the types TRIADS you can obtain in a major scale. So build chords of 3 notes and you'll start to notice which ones are dissonant and which are consonant. But of course, that concept will change next year


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thefireball
post May 20 2011, 06:49 PM
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Wow, this is a lot of info. smile.gif I need to learn things little by little of course. I see how much I don't know. A lot of these things don't make sense. biggrin.gif I'll check out some more lessons.


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 24 2011, 02:27 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ May 20 2011, 07:32 AM) *
This is a really interesting topic. Good answer from Sollesnes !

As he said, a lot of it will come down to your personal view on what sounds 'out' and what doesn't smile.gif I always thought the whole tone scale sounded crazy, as do augmented chords biggrin.gif

But apart from that, I guess I always think of semitones on adjacent strings to get that note 'bleeding into one another' sound smile.gif


Hahaha biggrin.gif my favorites biggrin.gif I use those a lot smile.gif they are particularly popular in modern metal contexts tongue.gif


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