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> Cosmin's Video Chat Lesson Notes
Sparrow
post Apr 24 2012, 12:14 AM
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So all the flats relative to the major scale, right? like in C major for example 1 b2 b3 4 5 6 would be c db eb f g a b

something like that?
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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 24 2012, 07:27 AM
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QUOTE (Sparrow @ Apr 23 2012, 11:14 PM) *
So all the flats relative to the major scale, right? like in C major for example 1 b2 b3 4 5 6 would be c db eb f g a b

something like that?


Yes mate, but if you want to create the C Locrian mode using the formula, it would look something like this: C Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C wink.gif as the formula is 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 8

Let me know if there are more questions, k?

Cosmin


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Sparrow
post Apr 27 2012, 02:58 AM
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Thanks for clearing that up. Cheers laugh.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 27 2012, 06:41 AM
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QUOTE (Sparrow @ Apr 27 2012, 01:58 AM) *
Thanks for clearing that up. Cheers laugh.gif


Nothing to it man wink.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 27 2012, 09:59 PM
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Captain's Log - April 27th 2012

The notes on yesterday's video chat session

As you guys have seen, we have been discussing around the Locrian mode latin jazz ideas, something like Mr. Al DiMeola would play.

The chord progression was Bm7b5 Bm7B5b9 Bm5+ Amadd9

Over this, as you will notice in the GP file (if you haven't attended the session where we discussed about the notes played over the progression) I used the Locrian mode over the B chords and the A Aeolian mode over the A chord. Both modes belong to the C major parent scale.

Other interesting facts:

- Over the A chord in the first part, I used A minor pentatonic with an added B note so that it would transition well between the Locrian and Aeolian.
- The second time the progression starts, I have used a Bm7b5 arpeggio, followed by A aeolian notes, all spiced up with percussive, short alternate picking runs.

Try to feel use the progression to develop your own licks as it's a typical Locrian progression based on the 1st and 7th step of the scale amd in the mean time check out the PDF and Guitar pro files smile.gif

I will see you next Thursday at 8 PM on the next modes session!

Cosmin

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Apr 30 2012, 06:59 AM
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Locrian_Mode_Part_2.gp5 ( 4.77K ) Number of downloads: 66
Attached File  Locrian_Mode_Part_2.pdf ( 154.72K ) Number of downloads: 84
Attached File  Locrian_Latin_Jazz.mp3 ( 1.81MB ) Number of downloads: 52
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 30 2012, 07:00 AM
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Hey guys smile.gif there's a backing track as well wink.gif had to re-build it, as the one you heard me playing against did not belong to me

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Apr 30 2012, 07:00 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Apr 30 2012, 08:53 AM
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Captain's log - April 30th 2012

Alright crew!

We are ready to dive in the more exotic part of the modes smile.gif that means that this month we'll be tackling Melodic Minor and Harmonic Minor plus some relative modes. From June I am thinking about presenting even more exotic stuff, such as traditional modes biggrin.gif it will be an extraordinary journey for me as well so I am looking forward to it!

We shall start with the Melodic Minor

Not only the major scale has it's modes but all the diatonic (7 note) scales have their own modes. That being said, let's see a few things about the melodic minor scale and a few of its modes in the two following sessions (May 3rd and May 10th)

Formula: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7

Chords types over which the mode fits best: mM7

The melodic minor scale can be regarded as a Dorian mode with a major 7 - thus you can modify all your Dorian licks and patterns by raising the b7 a half step, whenever the context offers a possibility.

It is also called the Jazz minor scale - it can be superimposed over m7 or even minor chords for a slightly outside feel, but it feels best over the mM7 chord (1 b3 5 7)

In Example 1 we are using the Dorian mode over the Am, Am7 and Am6 chords while implementing the Melodic minor over the AmM7

The first mode derived from the Melodic Minor (its 7th mode), is called the Super Locrian (Altered Scale) and it's among the most popular scales used in jazz.

- it is used over V chords, but instead of a perfect 4 it has a major 3 - this being the note making the difference between the Altered Scale and the Locrian mode. As you will see, this mode has all the possible alterations:

[b]Formula:[/b] 1 b9 #9 (b3) 4 b5 #5 b7

Chords over which the mode fits best: Altered dominant chords such as +7b9

Check out Example 2 which uses the G altered scale (derived from the Ab melodic minor - its 7 th mode) over the G+7b9 chord resolved to a Cm9

The sixth mode of the melodic minor scale - the Locrian #2

Formula: 1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

Chords over which the mode fits best: m7b5

It's an alternative to the Locrian mode, a softer version of the Locrian mode we may say. Feel free to use the m7b5 arpeggios we have discussed on in the Locrian sessions. Check out Example 3 where we combine the Locrian #2 (over the Em7b5) with the altered scale over the A+7 in the II V I progression in D minor.

These examples are more oriented towards the chord change emphasis rather than the key centered approach, due to the nature of the progressions used in these contexts.

See you on Thursday at 8 PM London time to chit chat on these ideas wink.gif

Cosmin
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Melodic_Minor_1.gp5 ( 4.18K ) Number of downloads: 48
Attached File  Melodic_Minor_1.pdf ( 165.11K ) Number of downloads: 93
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 3 2012, 10:16 PM
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In addition to the stuff above in Example 2 you can use this form for the G+7b9 - x 10 x 10 9 11 and in Example 3 you can use x x 7 10 8 9 for the A+7

See you next Thursday, 8 PM London time for the second session on the Melodic Minor mode and its derivates smile.gif lesson notes will be available on Monday so, please take some time to take a look wink.gif

cheers y'all

Cosmin

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: May 3 2012, 11:12 PM


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 7 2012, 09:27 AM
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Captain's Log - May 7th 2012

Continuing with the Melodic minor and its modes - I have two more ideas to present to you guys so we can finish this chapter and these shall be brought over this Thursday:

1) The 4th mode derived from the Melodic Minor scale- The Lydian Dominant or Lydian b7 is the same with the Lydian mode, but it has a b7 instead of a major 7.

Formula:
1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7

Chords over which the mode fits best: dominant 7th chords - it is more closely associated with the Mixolydian mode and the #11 makes it more akin to the #11 chords as you might have guessed.

Example 1 in the GP file will show how the mode is used over a static chord - a D9

The last example - Example 2, deals with a combo of the Melodic Minor scale and its modes!

The progression is based on the II V I IV7 formula in the key of G minor and here's how they are being stringed together:

- A Locrian #2 mode over the Am7b5 chord
- D altered scale over the D7b9
- G minor triad over the G minor chord
- G melodic minor over the GmM7 chord
- C Lydian Dominant over the C9(#11)

Check out the GP file and the PDF and we shall discuss about these in the v-chat session!

best of luck my friends and see you at 8 PM London time this Thursday!

Cosmin
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Melodic_minor_and_its_modes___Part_2.gp5 ( 4.09K ) Number of downloads: 39
Attached File  Melodic_minor____Part_2.pdf ( 175.79K ) Number of downloads: 129
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 11 2012, 11:50 AM
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Just dropped in to add the details on harmonizing the Melodic Minor scale smile.gif

The formula is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7

If we use triads, we shall have the following chords: minor minor augmented major major diminished diminished

if we use 7th chords:

mM7 m7 M7(#5) dom7 dom7 m7b5 m7b5

try these with any tonality and as many positions as you can find smile.gif

I shall see you next Thursday at 8 PM London time, as usual biggrin.gif it'll be Harmonic minor time!

Cosmin


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 15 2012, 09:07 AM
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Captain's Log, May 15th 2012

Crew, this Thursday, I shall be taking you into the world of the Harmonic Minor Scale smile.gif and for that here's what I prepared:

The Harmonic Minor scale has a raised 7 scale degree - it's formula: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7

It can be used as an alternative to the Aeolian mode (Yngwie and Tony MacAlpine are pretty well known for using it) as you may see in Example 1

The b6 degree brings out a heavier sound and the interval created between it and the 7th, offers a strong need for resolution (return) to the tonic.

It's most popular mode is the Phrygian Dominant (its fifth mode) - it's built exactly like the Phrygian mode, but instead of a b3rd, it has a major 3rd: 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7

Example 2 presents the mode, superimposed over a powerchord and resolved on a major chord.

If we harmonize the harmonic minor scale using 7th chords, we have the following formula:

ImM7 IIm7b5 bIIIM7#5 IVm7 V7 bVIM7 VII7

Example 3, shows us how to use the Phrygian Dominant mode over a VII7 chord. Since G harmonic minor is the parent scale for D phrygian dominant, we can use arpeggios derived from harmonizing the scale.

We shall discuss all these on Thursday evening, so see you at 8 PM London time in the chat room!

Cosmin
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Harmonic_Minor_Part_1.gp5 ( 3.34K ) Number of downloads: 50
Attached File  Harmonic_Minor_Part_1.pdf ( 125.05K ) Number of downloads: 91
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 17 2012, 09:30 PM
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Here are the additions about which we have discussed today tongue.gif

Chord harmonizing the G harmonic minor scale: GmM7 Am7b5 BbM7#5 Cm7 D7 EbM7 F#7

When we are playing onstage, we should always analyze the grooves played and the guitar parts so that we may find a rhythmic subdivision which is convenient for our body to use, so that it may move to it. i.e: if your formula has 16th notes your body can move to quarter notes!

See you next Thursday at 8 PM London time as usual! biggrin.gif

Cosmin


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 22 2012, 03:21 PM
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Captain's Log, May 22, 2012

Hear ye, hear ye!

The blues scale and its modes are coming!!

Let's see what we can learn by using the blues scale with a twist wink.gif so, this one is not a diatonic one, but that does not mean it doesn't contain any modes smile.gif

It's formula is 1 b3 4 5 b5 5 b7 and this will spawn some interesting combinations but a bit more special when being applied. The most popular one - the bluegrass scale - is created from the b3rd of the blues scale and it has the following formula: 1 2 b3 b 5 6 it looks like the major pentatonic scale with a b3 biggrin.gif nice, right? You can transpose your blues scale licks down a b3rd from the root of the chord if you want to play them in this mode!

Check out Example 1 for a dose of Bb bluegrass scale - observe how the 3rd and the b3rd are mixed

Example 2 is a more developed application of this mode, somewhat resembling a southern style solo

If we start on the 5th degree of the blues scale, we shall obtain a unique mode which will work best over dominant #9th chords. Its formula is: 1 b3 4 b6 b7 7. Tip: play the blues scale a fourth above or a fifth below the root of the chord over which you are soloing - this is our mode smile.gif

In Example 3, you can see this mode in action, by superimposing G blues scale licks over a D7#9 chord.


I'll be waiting for you guys as usual in the chat room on Thursday, at 8 PM London time smile.gif

See you there!

Cosmin

Attached File(s)
Attached File  The_blues_scale_and_its_modes.gp5 ( 4.56K ) Number of downloads: 46
Attached File  The_blues_scale_and_its_modes.pdf ( 169.62K ) Number of downloads: 151
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 25 2012, 04:12 PM
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Hey hombres! biggrin.gif here are the two exercises which spontaneously showed up at last night's session tongue.gif Use them wisely and don't forget to fill them in the Practice Journal wink.gif

See you NEXT FRIDAY at 11 PM LONDON TIME!

Cosmin
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Mixolydian_1.gp5 ( 1.81K ) Number of downloads: 47
Attached File  Mixolydian_1.pdf ( 64.2K ) Number of downloads: 85
Attached File  Pentatonic_3.gp5 ( 1.79K ) Number of downloads: 39
Attached File  Pentatonic_3.pdf ( 67.77K ) Number of downloads: 73
 


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Cosmin Lupu
post May 28 2012, 05:13 PM
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Captain's Log, May 28th 2012

Mates, the session I have thought of this week is aimed towards transforming dull and boring technique exercises into musical phrases which can be used in many contexts.

For this, I have chosen a few exercises which I want you guys to look over and during the chat session we shall learn how to apply changes to them and implement them into musical contexts making them A WHOLE LOT MORE FUN to practice.

It is essential to be able to use what you learn, so that at the end of the day you will become more and more musical and you can really say: 'Hey, I have learned THIS today and I can use it in 1000 situations' not 'I can play at 500 BPM today!.... and if I have to jam with some friends, I will shrug and tell them I can play at 500 BPM but I can't phrase anything in the context in which everyone else is playing laugh.gif

For this, I have thought of some exercises attached in here, which we are going to use as a starting point smile.gif

See you on Friday, June the 1st at 11 PM London time!

Cosmin
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Ex_1.6_GG.gp5 ( 1.81K ) Number of downloads: 58
Attached File  Ex_1.6_GG.pdf ( 58.79K ) Number of downloads: 72
Attached File  1_string_2.gp5 ( 1.77K ) Number of downloads: 52
Attached File  1_string_2.pdf ( 55.95K ) Number of downloads: 82
Attached File  Pentatonic_2.gp5 ( 1.82K ) Number of downloads: 47
Attached File  Pentatonic_2.pdf ( 58.47K ) Number of downloads: 56
 


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Sparrow
post Jun 3 2012, 01:32 AM
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Cosmin I'm sorry I missed your explanation of the mixolydian mode. I'm having trouble picturing mixolydian on the neck relative to the major scale. Can you say what key your mixolydian exercise is in?
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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 3 2012, 07:34 AM
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Hey man! It's D Mixolydian, having G major as its parent scale. Check it out:

G A B C D E F# G -> D is the 5th step of G major -> D E F# G A B C D the D Mixolydian mode

let me know if this helps smile.gif

Cosmin


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Sparrow
post Jun 3 2012, 09:18 PM
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Thanks, that cleared it up. I was confused because the exercise has a F (10th fret g string) which isn't in D major or D mixolydian. I guess you just threw in a note from the D minor scale for fun? smile.gif
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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 4 2012, 07:26 AM
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QUOTE (Sparrow @ Jun 3 2012, 08:18 PM) *
Thanks, that cleared it up. I was confused because the exercise has a F (10th fret g string) which isn't in D major or D mixolydian. I guess you just threw in a note from the D minor scale for fun? smile.gif


My bad biggrin.gif It's supposed to be an F# man tongue.gif it's the 11th fret on the G string. I guess I typed 0 instead of 1. Thanks for letting me know!

This post has been edited by Cosmin Lupu: Jun 4 2012, 07:27 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 4 2012, 07:36 PM
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Hey guys! Just wanted to add the GP containing the AP riffing example I showed you last time and the Vivaldi arpeggios used in the beginning of the first movement wink.gif

I will see you on Thursday on a session dealing with...song writing wink.gif yes guys! A lot of you have been asking me about song writing so, I shall describe the process and we shall try to come up with ideas starting from a few chord progressions I have prepared below:

Im IIm

I IV V

I b7 IV

We shall apply these progressions to any tonality and see where we could take them from that point:

- Use different types of chords
- Change some chords
- Transform the chords into formulas

Looking forward to sharing my ideas with you guys so I'll see you on Thursday at 8 PM London time as usual!

Cosmin

Attached File(s)
Attached File  Riffing_and_Vivaldi_Arpeggios.gp5 ( 3.77K ) Number of downloads: 41
Attached File  Riffing_and_Vivaldi_Arpeggios.pdf ( 149.11K ) Number of downloads: 73
 


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