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> Changing Pickups, Soldering question
mhskeide
post Jun 23 2011, 06:07 PM
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Hi guys!

I am about to change the setup of my guitar to one humbucker, and one volume pot. No tone or pickup switching (obviously).

Do I need any form for capasitor, or is that only if I would have a tone control?


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jun 23 2011, 06:45 PM
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Usually there shouldn't be any caps involved with such a simple setup. What kind of humbucker you are putting on??


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mhskeide
post Jun 23 2011, 06:57 PM
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Bare Knuckle aftermath for 7 string.....one angry beast I recieved in the mail today biggrin.gif

I will also install a Shadow kill-pot, so I can have a supereasy and reliable kill switch smile.gif

And are there some generel Do`s and don`ts regarding soldering?

I have for instance heard:

Put some soldering iron on both the volume pot and the wire before soldering

Make sure parts are clean, and well heated enough (not too much though)

Don`use grease / use grease.....what is correct here?


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jun 23 2011, 07:21 PM
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Just take it easy, and practice a bit on some scrap wires. Some practice will help you get the hang of it.

Here's a nice video tutorial:





EDIT:

PS I've changed my bridge humbucker on my strat, and it was even complicated task, although I never done it before. However, I did get some soldering practice. It's very easy to make a bad connection, so I strongly advise rehearsing on at least 10-15 wires before going for the real thing.


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Azzaboi
post Jun 23 2011, 07:35 PM
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No caps I think, unless you want a resister across the pot connections wiring for tone smoothing?

When I got my pickups replaced, I got them professionally installed. He said the tone (darkness or brightness) of your pickups comes down to the types of pots being used and some also apply a resister across them. I think it was 250k vs 500k pots made the guitar sound darker or brighter?

You should look at 'Stellartone Tonestyler Tone' pot for the best option of both worlds.

This post has been edited by Azzaboi: Jun 23 2011, 07:36 PM


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GregH
post Jun 23 2011, 07:54 PM
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Make sure that the soldering iron tip is clean. You can wipe it (when hot) on a wet sponge or rag (just enough to get it shiny). Put a little solder on the iron tip so you have a little puddle of melted solder. The melted solder transfers the heat to what you are soldering. If you are soldering two wires then tin them first. Tinning a wire means heating it up with the iron and melting a little solder on the bare end. It holds the strands together and provides the solder surface that will hold the joint together. When heating the wires for soldering (or wire and lug if you are, for instance, soldering to a pot), pick the item that will need the most heat, like the biggest wire or the pot lug and heat it first. When the solder on it is melting, add a little more and then put the other wire on it. When the solder on both parts has melted, remove the heat. Do not move the solder joint until it has cooled well below the melting temperature of the solder. Also, do not cool it by blowing on it or putting water on it. This will crystallize the solder joint, giving it a dull appearance (called a cold solder joint). This weakens it a lot.
It is better to use a small diameter solder, like 22 gauge. It takes less heating time to melt the solder making it less damaging to the wire.
You typically want a small iron, like 25 to 60 watt. In general, a smaller iron will do less damage but if it takes longer to heat the joint up, then the part will actually get hotter then a bigger iron for a shorter period of time. I personally like to go on the bigger side but I have been doing it for a long time.
Just like playing the guitar, practice is your friend. Try it first on scraps.
Hope this helps. Feel free to ask questions.
Greg
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dark dude
post Jun 23 2011, 08:30 PM
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QUOTE (GregH @ Jun 23 2011, 07:54 PM) *
Make sure that the soldering iron tip is clean. You can wipe it (when hot) on a wet sponge or rag (just enough to get it shiny). Put a little solder on the iron tip so you have a little puddle of melted solder. The melted solder transfers the heat to what you are soldering. If you are soldering two wires then tin them first. Tinning a wire means heating it up with the iron and melting a little solder on the bare end. It holds the strands together and provides the solder surface that will hold the joint together. When heating the wires for soldering (or wire and lug if you are, for instance, soldering to a pot), pick the item that will need the most heat, like the biggest wire or the pot lug and heat it first. When the solder on it is melting, add a little more and then put the other wire on it. When the solder on both parts has melted, remove the heat. Do not move the solder joint until it has cooled well below the melting temperature of the solder. Also, do not cool it by blowing on it or putting water on it. This will crystallize the solder joint, giving it a dull appearance (called a cold solder joint). This weakens it a lot.
It is better to use a small diameter solder, like 22 gauge. It takes less heating time to melt the solder making it less damaging to the wire.
You typically want a small iron, like 25 to 60 watt. In general, a smaller iron will do less damage but if it takes longer to heat the joint up, then the part will actually get hotter then a bigger iron for a shorter period of time. I personally like to go on the bigger side but I have been doing it for a long time.
Just like playing the guitar, practice is your friend. Try it first on scraps.
Hope this helps. Feel free to ask questions.
Greg

Cheers Greg, lots of worthwhile info. here.


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MickeM
post Jun 23 2011, 08:53 PM
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no need for a capacitor then.


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Sensible Jones
post Jun 26 2011, 06:22 PM
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No need for a Capacitor in the circuit, unless you want to incorporate a 'Tone Bleed' set-up. Personally I wouldn't worry about doing that, you can always do it at a later date if you want to!

As for the soldering part, Greg has given some great advice there although I would just add this..
Personally I always have 2 Soldering Irons for a pick-up change. A small wattage one as suggested for 'tinning' the wire ends and connections to the 'Tabs' on the Pot. (The 'Hot' or 'Live' feed from the pick-up) Also a bigger wattage one for soldering connections to the Pot Casing (The Ground feed from the Pick-up).
smile.gif


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MickeM
post Jun 26 2011, 08:13 PM
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Yeah SJ, that's a good point to have two irons. I have one at 15W and one at 30 watts for grounding wires to the pot. In the end I often do everything with the 30 watt iron with some burnt wire insultaion as a result. biggrin.gif


But yes, two different gives a better overall result. Got to be careful with 30 watt iron since a pot can overhear.


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jun 26 2011, 08:30 PM
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Ah yes, failed the remember that. It's definitely important to use stronger soldering iron for pots, as they act as a heatsink. It's hard to get those connections unsoldered/soldered to it.


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GregH
post Jun 26 2011, 10:14 PM
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I use one iron, 60 watt but temperature regulated. I have it set at 600f degrees. I usually use a rather blunt tip. The higher wattage and extra mass of the blunt tip keeps the tip from cooling off much while soldering but 600f degrees is cool enough that you have more time before you fry something.
Temperature regulated irons cost a little more (or a lot if bought new) but are well worth it if you are going to do much soldering.
An example of a temperature regulated iron is a Weller soldering station. I have bought them for as little as $25.
But in a pinch, you can solder with anything that heats up.
Greg
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Sensible Jones
post Jun 28 2011, 03:27 PM
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QUOTE (GregH @ Jun 26 2011, 10:14 PM) *
An example of a temperature regulated iron is a Weller soldering station. I have bought them for as little as $25.
But in a pinch, you can solder with anything that heats up.
Greg

More good points again Greg!
I use a small gas Iron for quick repairs etc at Gigs and so on. At home I have an Antex soldering station as well as a good range of normal Irons.
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