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> Introduction To Scales
Muris Varajic
post Feb 10 2008, 04:35 PM
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QUOTE (JensN @ Feb 10 2008, 04:34 PM) *
I'm indeed enjoying Andrew's theory lessons.
Big kudos for the effort you have put in here Andrew!

At the moment I have more time then usual to dig into theory since it seems I have been a bit over ambitious with exercises. I will let the guitars rest for a week or two to let my left hand get back into shape. But I think the theory lessons will be a huge advantage when I get back to playing again. smile.gif


Absolutely,learning theory while you're having practicing break is
THE BEST you can do,thumbs up! smile.gif


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JCJXXL
post Oct 11 2008, 11:34 PM
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Due to an injury that prevents me from playing I've decided to finally jump into Andrew's theory lessons while I'm healing.

Excellent stuff Andrew! THANK YOU!!!

I have a question about boxes. You mentioned that one could simply move the box up to play in a different key. For example, slide your box/pattern up from G on the low E to A on the low E and you're now in the key of A.

If this is true why are there different shaped boxes then? Why couldn't one learn just one box and simply move the box accordingly to be in the desired key? What is the reason for learning all of the different shaped boxes for a scale?

This post has been edited by JCJXXL: Oct 11 2008, 11:43 PM
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Andrew Cockburn
post Oct 12 2008, 02:27 AM
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A very wise idea - both to rest, and to learn some theory!

So, in answer to your question, its pretty simple really, if you were stuck with one box, you would be limited to a couple of octaves of notes. What if you started with that A major box on the E string but wanted to play some really high notes 3 octaves or more up? Well, you would just use a different box- each box has an overlapping range of notes within the scale, and you pretty much pick the one that suits the register you want to play in at that particular time. When you get better with the boxes you can string them together to make great long scalar runs that span more notes that you would be able to play with just a single box - hope that helps!


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JCJXXL
post Oct 12 2008, 03:10 PM
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Thanks! I understand your answer, it makes sense.

EDIT: Had another question but I understand why we can't use the same box on higher frets because we'd be out of key then. Duh.

This post has been edited by JCJXXL: Oct 12 2008, 04:16 PM
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Animosity
post Jan 20 2010, 08:37 AM
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Okay..

So, I've decided that I want to learn theory so I am starting tonight. biggrin.gif

I just gave this article a once over (I'm sure I will read it quite a few times) and I have one question so far:

If the formula for a Major scale is 2 2 1 2 2 2 1, what is the formula for a Minor scale?
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Sollesnes
post Jan 20 2010, 08:58 AM
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W H W W H W W, or 2 1 2 2 1 2 2. It's the same grouping, just starting from the sixth note, as minor is the aeolian mode.
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Animosity
post Jan 20 2010, 09:06 PM
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QUOTE (Sollesnes @ Jan 20 2010, 01:58 AM) *
W H W W H W W, or 2 1 2 2 1 2 2. It's the same grouping, just starting from the sixth note, as minor is the aeolian mode.


So a G Minor scale would look like:

G, A, A#, C, D, D#, F, G

Right?

Is it not necessary to list the final G? Sort of like an implied note?
All Major and Minor scales using these two formulas will start and end with the same note, correct?
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jafomatic
post Jan 20 2010, 09:20 PM
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QUOTE (Animosity @ Jan 20 2010, 02:06 PM) *
So a G Minor scale would look like:

G, A, A#, C, D, D#, F, G

Right?

Is it not necessary to list the final G? Sort of like an implied note?
All Major and Minor scales using these two formulas will start and end with the same note, correct?


Correction to your example should be

G, A, Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G

You cannot re-use the same note as you did with: D, D# and A, A#. The rest is correct.


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Animosity
post Jan 21 2010, 04:16 AM
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QUOTE (jafomatic @ Jan 20 2010, 02:20 PM) *
Correction to your example should be

G, A, Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G

You cannot re-use the same note as you did with: D, D# and A, A#. The rest is correct.



Why not?
Isn't Bb the same as A# tonally?
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jafomatic
post Jan 21 2010, 05:59 AM
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QUOTE (Animosity @ Jan 20 2010, 09:16 PM) *
Why not?
Isn't Bb the same as A# tonally?


To our ears, yes. To the sheet music, no. The treble clef has but one poor space to represent A and but one poor line to represent B, how would you use both at the same time? The answer is that there IS a mechanism to accomplish that type of trickery but it has its own drawbacks as you'll see when you get to that part in the theory chapters. Further, everyone else will wonder why that extra level of hassle was used incorrectly.



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The Professor
post Jan 9 2013, 11:31 AM
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The formula for a natural minor scale would be

2 1 2 2 1 2 2

Or, if you were starting on the note A it would be


A B C D E F G A


Another way to thing about it is to see it related to the major scale.

The A major scale has the notes A B C# D E F# G# A

or as a series of intervals it can be read as


R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R


To make the minor scale, you just use the following interval formula compared to the major scale


R 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 R

Which produces the notes A B C D E F G A when applied to the root note A.


Both are good ways to think about it, but some people find it easier to think about one or the other so both are worth exploring to see which one makes more sense to you.


QUOTE (Animosity @ Jan 20 2010, 07:37 AM) *
Okay..

So, I've decided that I want to learn theory so I am starting tonight. biggrin.gif

I just gave this article a once over (I'm sure I will read it quite a few times) and I have one question so far:

If the formula for a Major scale is 2 2 1 2 2 2 1, what is the formula for a Minor scale?



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Ovidiu Ienciu
post Feb 19 2013, 10:47 PM
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Hello all, i am new here so this is my first post here smile.gif.
I have a question for you.
Can u explain me how come , a minor pent scale can be a major pent scale in a different key.
For example A minor pentatonic scale its the same thing with C major pentatonic scale.

There are other such links like my example, and how can i easily identify them?
I mean ,
if Am pent = Cmaj pent
Em pentatonic =?
Bm pentatonic=?
and so on.

Thank you.
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The Professor
post Feb 19 2013, 10:54 PM
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Good question. To figure that out, you just find the minor pentatonic you are on and go up 3 frets to find the major pent that is related to it.

So, if you have E minor pent, the relative major is G major pent. And so on.


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Ovidiu Ienciu
post Feb 19 2013, 11:40 PM
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QUOTE (The Professor @ Feb 19 2013, 09:54 PM) *
Good question. To figure that out, you just find the minor pentatonic you are on and go up 3 frets to find the major pent that is related to it.

So, if you have E minor pent, the relative major is G major pent. And so on.


Oh, i understand now.Thank you smile.gif
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Joshua Chinquee
post Feb 20 2013, 12:37 AM
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I'm a little confused, though... Since the G Major scale is G,A,B,C,D,E,F#, wouldn't the G# Major scale be G#,A#,B#,C#,D#,E#,F##? I'm just wondering why write it with C and C#, G and G#, and missing the B and E. Having different notes with the same name (C,C#;G,G#) in the same scale just looks like it would throw me through a major loop since I'm not too great at this, haha. Or couldn't you even write it as an Ab Major scale to make it even simpler? I think that would be something like Ab,Bb,C,Db,Eb,F,G... Sorry for asking for someone to spell it out for me, I'm just a little lost. :/
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The Professor
post Feb 20 2013, 07:14 AM
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QUOTE (Joshua Chinquee @ Feb 19 2013, 11:37 PM) *
I'm a little confused, though... Since the G Major scale is G,A,B,C,D,E,F#, wouldn't the G# Major scale be G#,A#,B#,C#,D#,E#,F##? I'm just wondering why write it with C and C#, G and G#, and missing the B and E. Having different notes with the same name (C,C#;G,G#) in the same scale just looks like it would throw me through a major loop since I'm not too great at this, haha. Or couldn't you even write it as an Ab Major scale to make it even simpler? I think that would be something like Ab,Bb,C,Db,Eb,F,G... Sorry for asking for someone to spell it out for me, I'm just a little lost. :/



That is right, G# major scale would have B#, E# and Fx in it.

If someone asked you to write out a G# major scale, you would use those notes, G# A# B# C# D# E# Fx G#. But, if someone gave you the option, such as "write out the notes of the major scale that starts on the fourth fret of the 6th string" then I would go with Ab major since it's the easier key signature.

Unless it is being asked in a specific way, then always go with the easiest key signature, just makes it easier on you that way.


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