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> Fast Back And Forth Whole Step Vibrato, unorthodox vibrato
noztnac
post Jul 5 2011, 06:06 AM
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There is a really cool type of vibrato where the fretting hand moves rapidly along the length of the strings creating a kind of a blur effect.
I have been trying to add this effect to my arsenal but would like a concrete way to practice it.

One problem is that it happens really fast and it's hard to analyze exactly what is happening. Here is my best guess and maybe someone more knowledgeable can correct me or add to what I'm saying.

1. It seems like it's usually two up down motions starting on a specific note and the slide usually seems to be a whole step up.

2. You can't have very much pressure at all from the thumb on the back of the neck because it will get hung up and ruin the effect.

3. The slide seems to be with the rhythm of the song.

4. It seems to work with clean and distorted tones.

5. It should probably not be overused...

My questions are as follows:

1. Is there a good way to practice this technique?

2. What notes in a phrase are the best choices for adding this?

3. Who was the first to do this? I recall George Lynch doing it way back in the 80's albeit a bit differently.

4. Are there any other players who make extensive use of this effect?

In case anyone is wondering what the heck I'm talking about here are some examples:

Marco de Cave
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_sVHaU5gzE


Daniele Gottardo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hmSu3jALaAw

Skip ahead to 1:39 where the improv starts

Greg Howe
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edVbz_uXJd0
at the :20 mark and more later


Thanks,

John Foster
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Ben Higgins
post Jul 5 2011, 10:48 AM
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Hi John,

The effect you're talking about is called 'glissando vibrato'... it is a rapid slide which covers either side of the intended note to produce that effect. It is a tricky technique to learn (as I recall !) but a really fun and rewarding one when you get it right. I recommend practising it on the B or G string. You are correct in that you need to loosen your grip on the neck so you are just barely touching it. Try and keep your hand rigid but without being 'tense'.. also try and make sure you keep the movement lateral, parallel with the fretboard.. because if you have a rocking up and down motion you'll ruin the effect.

Try alternating between practising the motion very slow and practising a few fast ones. Usually the range of the slide is about a whole tone as you said. For example if you were playing the effect on a D note, then your slide would hit D# and C# as well as the D.

This is just an approximation to get you started.. when you've learnt the technique, you don't think about the exact notes, you just go for it ! smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 5 2011, 12:38 PM
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Ben, is right about the fact that you will hit notes without being very accurate regarding the pitch or certain notes smile.gif Greg himself said that last year, when I asked the exact same question at a guitar clinic.


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Daniel Realpe
post Jul 5 2011, 12:44 PM
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I know what technique you are refering to. I always found it really expressive but I have never tried it myself. I'll start doing it.

The way I approach a new technique is just by observing carefully what a master in it does and emulate his every move. But also I pay attention to any uncomfortable movement in my hand or pain. Make sure you are warmed up when trying new techniques because they may involve using your muscles in a different way, and that might be stopping you from achieving the same result.


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 5 2011, 03:35 PM
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QUOTE (Daniel Realpe @ Jul 5 2011, 12:44 PM) *
The way I approach a new technique is just by observing carefully what a master in it does and emulate his every move. But also I pay attention to any uncomfortable movement in my hand or pain. Make sure you are warmed up when trying new techniques because they may involve using your muscles in a different way, and that might be stopping you from achieving the same result.


Yeah, Daniels' got a good point. Use other guitarists as a reference point but take note of your own body and go with what feels comfortable and don't force yourself to do anything unnatural. You won't encounter anything too unnatural in this technique but this advice definitely applies to many other techniques.


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 5 2011, 05:16 PM
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Just thought I'd let you know that I'm going to talk about this type of vibrato in my video chat, starting at 19:00 GMT.. hopefully the time is good for you and you're free to watch ! smile.gif


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noztnac
post Jul 6 2011, 01:37 AM
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Thanks for the tips. By the way, I'm relatively new to this site and have been very impressed with the helpful responses I've gotten. I've asked very similar questions on other sites and have been insulted or condescended to without ever really getting good answers.

Anyway, I'm very glad it is different here.

Thanks,
John Foster
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noztnac
post Jul 6 2011, 05:21 AM
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It would be cool if someone could write a few exercises or a specific little guitar etude using this technique.
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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 6 2011, 06:39 AM
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QUOTE (noztnac @ Jul 6 2011, 12:37 AM) *
Thanks for the tips. By the way, I'm relatively new to this site and have been very impressed with the helpful responses I've gotten. I've asked very similar questions on other sites and have been insulted or condescended to without ever really getting good answers.

Anyway, I'm very glad it is different here.

Thanks,
John Foster


Hey mate smile.gif glad ya feel good here. Keep your questions coming and we won't let you down. Cheers!


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