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> Rhythm Of Life, developing rhythm....
Ben Higgins
post Aug 5 2011, 09:25 AM
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Hey Guys..

Over the years I've heard many people say things like 'I've got no natural rhythm at all'... well, I've got news for those people. If you can walk, talk and breathe then you have rhythm. Even our hearts beat in rhythm. You just have to identify with rhythm and develop it.

Some find it easier than others but it doesn't mean you don't have it. One way I developed rhythm is by doing a lot of strumming. When I learnt enough chords to put together (2 or 3 is enough) then I would try strumming different ways until I could link the chords together seamlessly with no pausing or hesitation. Not only was I getting better at timing but it also helped develop the synchronisation between my left and right hands.

Another reason I believe it's good is because strumming uses big movements. Usually when learning a new skill, we stick to breaking things down to basic, easy, manageable movements. This is because it is easier to ingrain into your brain. After a while, the confidence with our new found skills can be applied to smaller techniques like alternate picking etc..

Keeping things big and basic gives you a ) reference points for your brain to hold onto and b ) more time to think

This is just one way that you can develop your rhythm playing. What other methods do you guys advocate ?

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Aug 5 2011, 09:25 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 5 2011, 09:55 AM
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There's rhythm in everything we do! biggrin.gif

I've got a friend that makes beats out of everything he does biggrin.gif even when he cooks - it looks and feels awesome to watch tongue.gif

In my opinion, you have to learn how to move when you play! Transform your body into a metronome smile.gif and presto! You'll be able to feel grooves and play a lot better than ever, just because it's internal, and you don't feel like you always have to listen to some metronome from outside smile.gif

I have implemented a little surprise related to this topic in my next lesson in the Metal Metrics series. Watch out! tongue.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Aug 5 2011, 10:03 AM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Aug 5 2011, 09:55 AM) *
In my opinion, you have to learn how to move when you play! Transform your body into a metronome smile.gif and presto! You'll be able to feel grooves and play a lot better than ever, just because it's internal, and you don't feel like you always have to listen to some metronome from outside smile.gif

I have implemented a little surprise related to this topic in my next lesson in the Metal Metrics series. Watch out! tongue.gif


That's right.. the big movement helps implant the rhythm in our brain and makes it easier to express it smile.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 5 2011, 03:28 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 5 2011, 05:25 AM) *
Hey Guys..

Over the years I've heard many people say things like 'I've got no natural rhythm at all'... well, I've got news for those people. If you can walk, talk and breathe then you have rhythm. Even our hearts beat in rhythm. You just have to identify with rhythm and develop it.

Some find it easier than others but it doesn't mean you don't have it. One way I developed rhythm is by doing a lot of strumming. When I learnt enough chords to put together (2 or 3 is enough) then I would try strumming different ways until I could link the chords together seamlessly with no pausing or hesitation. Not only was I getting better at timing but it also helped develop the synchronisation between my left and right hands.

Another reason I believe it's good is because strumming uses big movements. Usually when learning a new skill, we stick to breaking things down to basic, easy, manageable movements. This is because it is easier to ingrain into your brain. After a while, the confidence with our new found skills can be applied to smaller techniques like alternate picking etc..

Keeping things big and basic gives you a ) reference points for your brain to hold onto and b ) more time to think

This is just one way that you can develop your rhythm playing. What other methods do you guys advocate ?



that's a very good thought Ben! It's true that some people seems to be more skilled than other for rhythm but it's something that everybody can develop. I used to play a lot of rhythm stuff when I was a beginner... I had chord songbooks by Ramones, Rolling Stones, Nirvana, Gun's and Roses and I used to play over the records all day. I think that playing songs over the records is a good way to train your rhythm.


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Ben Higgins
post Aug 5 2011, 03:31 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 5 2011, 03:28 PM) *
that's a very good thought Ben! It's true that some people seems to be more skilled than other for rhythm but it's something that everybody can develop. I used to play a lot of rhythm stuff when I was a beginner... I had chord songbooks by Ramones, Rolling Stones, Nirvana, Gun's and Roses and I used to play over the records all day. I think that playing songs over the records is a good way to train your rhythm.


Yes, absolutely !! Once I knew how to play the 2 note power chord shape I was figuring out every song I could, including Nirvana wink.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Aug 5 2011, 03:53 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Aug 5 2011, 11:31 AM) *
Yes, absolutely !! Once I knew how to play the 2 note power chord shape I was figuring out every song I could, including Nirvana wink.gif



haha yes, I remember that I starting this before learning the chords well. I just played two notes of the most difficult chords like.. D or G hahah
it didn't sound perfect but it sounded similar... biggrin.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Aug 5 2011, 03:54 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Aug 5 2011, 03:53 PM) *
haha yes, I remember that I starting this before learning the chords well. I just played two notes of the most difficult chords like.. D or G hahah
it didn't sound perfect but it sounded similar... biggrin.gif


That's just it - it's all you need to start training yourself to recognise chord sounds and intervals too smile.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Aug 5 2011, 04:34 PM
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To me playing a bit of drums helped me. At the beginning I was doing it with a couple of pens on notebooks, then on real drums. Also being aware of time signatures and where the first beat of the bar always makes you better at timing when playing


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