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> I Really Need Some Guidence.. Please Help!
Coastie Brian
post Aug 6 2011, 03:58 AM
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OK here is the skinny. I have been playing off and on about 10 years. Really off and on. I can play all types of chords and what not, no problem. I want to learn how to play lead. So I bought a scale book and can play the Major scales up and down the fretboard.
I can play the Major and Minor penatonics pretty good as well. First question is "What level does that make me as far as GMC is concerned?"

So the second and most important, What do I need to be doing now to become a good lead player?
My old guitar instructor asked me what do I want to do? He says, "Do you want to write your own music, do you want play songs or what?"
And I told him, "I want to be able to jam freely."

So I know about chord progressions and what not. What ever Key your in is what scale to play off of. My problem is that
jamming freely part. What and how do you practice to just become that really great guitarist. I am hammering these scales and it just seems like I am playing these series of notes that never change.

Can someone give me some guidance on how to bring this monotonous training of scales to use?
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MonkeyDAthos
post Aug 6 2011, 04:04 AM
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You need to unlock your ear wink.gif


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casinostrat
post Aug 6 2011, 04:36 AM
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I understand where you are coming from, since I had the same problem. First you need to have the scales memorized and know how play within the key i.e. what scale to use in any given situation. This frees you to consentrate on techniques, since you don't have to worry about what note to play and where to play it. You seem to already know these things so the trick now is to apply techniques to liven up the scales. For instance instead of playing say, three notes in a row, play two and bend up to the third, then reverse back down the scale, adding wide vibrato to each note and then perhaps sliding into the root note of the scale. Things like this will give you ideas on how to break out of just playing scales. look for places to apply techniques such as vibrato, bending and other things in order to liven up your solos. Listening to your favorite guitarists and trying to figure out what they are doing will help you to develop an ear for what sounds good and give you more techniques to learn and then apply to your own playing. Backing Tracks can also be a great help in this area, because you can work on improvising over the track. For instance when I wanted to learn tapping techniques I used the backing track to "Still got the Blues" by Gary Moore. As far as I know that song has no tapping in it and I did not try to even play the song, but just tried to stay within the key and apply the techniques I wanted to learn. The more techniques you absord and master the better you will be able play freely and sound great. Be patient, because the freedom to express yourself through the guitar comes slowly in some cases. Hope this helps wink.gif


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Azzaboi
post Aug 6 2011, 05:56 AM
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Cool your got some music theory such as scales, chords and arpeggios under your belt? Well, the dangers of this approach is getting boxed into them or doing speed for speed's sake and sounding mechanical/sterile.

To be able to jam freely
You need to first learn some theory, those box scales and then patterns from those scales, learn a couple at least, then escape with extended patterns and overlap from those boxes while still staying in key - returning to the root note. Make a good melodic sense whether to play it fast or slow.

Playing the same old scale pattern is boring, try combining fragments of scales, patterns, and licks - think how can I twist and wrap this into my own music. For the sake of music experiment!

If your into rock or shred, start learning the minor keys more over the major keys as they are heavier/darker and more theatrical.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Aug 6 2011, 07:59 AM
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Hey mate!

Jamming freely is like writing a story, but instead of words you'll use notes smile.gif like words, notes can have nuances and dynamics and when put together, they can create a phrase.

This is what you have to start having in mind. Learning the dynamics and colors of words was a thing which came in time from reading a lot and mainly listening the spoken words, in songs, stories, conversations and all sorts of contexts -> listen to tons of music and in parallel train your ears into recognizing intervals and scales/ modes in respect to a harmony over which they are played. If you learn scales by themselves, you'll only know WHERE to put your fingers, not WHEN to do it smile.gif

Improvisation, or free jamming, is an art in itself and yes it's very similar to speaking freely smile.gif remember: tell a story...

Here, at GMC, you have tons of phrasing lessons, which will give you great ideas on how to use your ears, mind and fingers together, in order to be able to express yourself freely!

If you have questions, please go ahead and ask smile.gif I'd be glad to help. See you around!


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Ben Higgins
post Aug 6 2011, 09:48 AM
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Ok there's been some good tips here already. What Azzabio described about combining box shapes (like Pentatonic box patterns) and more scalar shapes (like 3 note per string shapes) is how I developed my playing to break out of the same shapes. (and I'm still working on it !)

This might sound boring but one thing I did very early on in my playing was learn the minor scale on the top E string. By teaching myself where to put my finger next, I was unknowngly teaching myself the classic 3 note per string shapes. Although this is just one way of navigating the neck, the 3 nps shapes are universal amongst guitarists because they are so good at covering ground and the shapes can be applied to any scale or mode once learned. Are you familiar with these shapes ? They're basically just finger combinations..

In this lesson I made, you can see the basic 3 nps shapes. https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Bens-Land-Of-Legato/ These ones are diatonic, which means the notes are played in sequence of running through the scale. When you break out of diatonic patterns is when you're making music ! However, most fast runs done by players (especially off-the-cuff, improvised stuff) will be diatonic, because that's what falls most easily to hand. If you combine learning one scale on one string and combining that with the 3 nps shapes, soon you will be able to unconsiously move through a scale, or up and down (when you add other strings into it). This will give you a bit more freedom to move about and stop you feeling 'boxed in'.

Casinostrat gave some great advice too. Learn the different ays that guitarists create their melodies. Some with slides, some with bends. Also, melodies are made up of different note values. All the notes don't sound the same.. 2 short notes, a long note.. pause, another short note etc etc.. this is what phrasing is. This is a good example of sliding and bending combined with different note values.. https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Bend-A...lide-Exercises/

ANother thing Azzaboi said I completely agree with. Identify with what you're interested in the most and make that your priority. 90% of what I do is either minor or pentatonic.. that's not to say you should narrow your horizons but just don't overload yourself with stuff that won't immediately benefit or make sense to you. Keep it fun, play with it, experiment.

Oh, and listen to lots of Joe Satriani ! cool.gif

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Aug 6 2011, 07:36 PM


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dark dude
post Aug 6 2011, 10:59 AM
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QUOTE (MonkeyDAthos @ Aug 6 2011, 04:04 AM) *
You need to unlock your ear wink.gif

This.

Here's one free ear training website to get you started: http://www.musiclearningtools.net/. Start by learning the intervals melodically (unison, minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, etc), then harmonically (the two notes playing at the same time) and from there move to chords and scales.

Try to practice this for 30 min / day and soon it'll be MUCH easier to play what you hear in your head.

Also, start tabbing out simple songs. This will also help with your ear training. Start VERY simple, e.g. nursery rhymes.


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 6 2011, 12:41 PM
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At the risk of pimping my own Vid Chat, I'd say COME TO MY NEXT VIDEO CHAT LESSON! smile.gif We do lots of work on creating good guitar solos. Every week, we take scales/shapes etc, and put them in to real musical context by playing them with actual music! We start with the metronome, then switch to a backing track once we have it down.

This week, we are using Cosmin Lupu's Metal Collaboration as our backing. It's a great way to learn some solo licks and play them with music and be able to ask questions in real time. So please do join us!

It's Every Saturday @ 5PM EST, 10PM GMT.

Here is the link for what we will be working on .

http://soundcloud.com/techniqueswithtodd/gmclesson69final

Aside from that, there have been some great replies here. Try all of them! Also, try to spend as much practice time as you can actually improvising! Learning scales is great, but learning them in a vacuum is a bit tedious. Start playing around with soloing over backing tracks, songs you like, anything. Experiment, get creative, practice! smile.gif

Todd


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Coastie Brian
post Aug 6 2011, 05:05 PM
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All these replies make perfect sense. Sometimes you just need to hear what you need to do from other perspectives.
I do appreciate all the input and I am getting started right away. Lets see if I can get it together.

Thanks again guys
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