Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Solos Over Fast Rhythm, Best way to approach
Narzsa
post Sep 5 2011, 02:34 PM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



Hi guys,

I hope your all well. i was just wondering, what the best approach to take when trying to compose a solo over a fast rhythme backing tracking? This can be tempo wise and note changing wise.

I think i ve answered my own question, but would it be to slow it down, write the solo then speed it back up to match the original source?

Kind Regards


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
thefireball
post Sep 5 2011, 02:37 PM
Post #2


Learning Roadie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 4.487
Joined: 9-March 10
From: United States, Arkansas
Member No.: 9.801



QUOTE (Narzsa @ Sep 5 2011, 08:34 AM) *
Hi guys,

I hope your all well. i was just wondering, what the best approach to take when trying to compose a solo over a fast rhythme backing tracking? This can be tempo wise and note changing wise.

I think i ve answered my own question, but would it be to slow it down, write the solo then speed it back up to match the original source?

Kind Regards


I would say that's a good way to do it. Or if you want, you could write a gist of the melody and then add embellishments.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Daniel Realpe
post Sep 5 2011, 04:31 PM
Post #3


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 5.655
Joined: 11-October 09
From: Bogota
Member No.: 7.694



I think those are good approaches,

Also you might consider listening to a few similar solos to get some ideas.


--------------------
Visit my:
INSTRUCTOR PROFILE

"If a composer could say what he had to say in words he would not bother trying to say it in music."
Gustav Mahler


Subscribe to my Youtube Channel here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Sep 5 2011, 07:59 PM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



Hey, this is a good question. Shame there isn't more answers, although hopefully more people will see it now I've added an answer smile.gif

Points that I consider when composing a solo:

- Tempo of backing. Create contrast with the backing by playing longer notes over a fast backing, combined with quicker passages. Very few of the 'greats' just blaze away at one speed. Most of them know how to pace a good solo by including some long sustained bends (like Kirk Hammett does in Battery or Blackened) before fast bits. Just remember that because the song is fast, it doesn't mean the melody has to be fast. Sometimes the contrast created between a slower solo and faster backing can have more effect.

- Am I deliberately trying 'too hard' ? Am I trying to write things that are currently beyond my ability ? We don't always have to see a solo as an opportunity to showcase what we can do. Most times, the best approach is to work with what we currently have within our ability. If you write with what you already can do, then there won't be much need to slow things down and practice it until you can play it.

I hope this helps. smile.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ivan Milenkovic
post Sep 5 2011, 08:08 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 25.396
Joined: 20-November 07
From: Belgrade, Serbia
Member No.: 3.341



Start simple, and work your way through the backing as you go along, this would be my approach both for composing the solo, and improvising over it.

If the tempo is fast paced, bigger note durations will work, depending on your speed limit. So instead of using 16th note triplets, you can use 8th note triplets, or quintuplet fractions if you have the feel for them.

When I play faster, I usually end up using combinations of several AP runs that I can play fast, combined with faster legato playing + melodic passages. That reminds me.. should practice a bit X)


--------------------
- Ivan's Video Chat Lesson Notes HERE
- Check out my GMC Profile and Lessons
- (Please subscribe to my) YouTube Official Channel
- Let's be connected through ! Facebook! :)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 5 2011, 10:25 PM
Post #6


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 5 2011, 06:59 PM) *
Hey, this is a good question. Shame there isn't more answers, although hopefully more people will see it now I've added an answer smile.gif

Points that I consider when composing a solo:

- Tempo of backing. Create contrast with the backing by playing longer notes over a fast backing, combined with quicker passages. Very few of the 'greats' just blaze away at one speed. Most of them know how to pace a good solo by including some long sustained bends (like Kirk Hammett does in Battery or Blackened) before fast bits. Just remember that because the song is fast, it doesn't mean the melody has to be fast. Sometimes the contrast created between a slower solo and faster backing can have more effect.

- Am I deliberately trying 'too hard' ? Am I trying to write things that are currently beyond my ability ? We don't always have to see a solo as an opportunity to showcase what we can do. Most times, the best approach is to work with what we currently have within our ability. If you write with what you already can do, then there won't be much need to slow things down and practice it until you can play it.

I hope this helps. smile.gif


Pffff...lucky me I read Ben's reply tongue.gif I was ready to say the same thing about combining the long notes on the context smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Sep 5 2011, 11:24 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 5 2011, 07:59 PM) *
Hey, this is a good question. Shame there isn't more answers, although hopefully more people will see it now I've added an answer smile.gif

Points that I consider when composing a solo:

- Tempo of backing. Create contrast with the backing by playing longer notes over a fast backing, combined with quicker passages. Very few of the 'greats' just blaze away at one speed. Most of them know how to pace a good solo by including some long sustained bends (like Kirk Hammett does in Battery or Blackened) before fast bits. Just remember that because the song is fast, it doesn't mean the melody has to be fast. Sometimes the contrast created between a slower solo and faster backing can have more effect.

- Am I deliberately trying 'too hard' ? Am I trying to write things that are currently beyond my ability ? We don't always have to see a solo as an opportunity to showcase what we can do. Most times, the best approach is to work with what we currently have within our ability. If you write with what you already can do, then there won't be much need to slow things down and practice it until you can play it.

I hope this helps. smile.gif


Those are some awesome points. Im definitely going to experiment with contrast some slow passages in there as i love solos that can mix shred and beautiful melodies biggrin.gif bands like megadeth and arch enemy are especially good at setting their own pace with the lead over tricky rhythms and i d love to be able to bring some of that into this

Breaking it down and slowing it has helped so much. It feels so much more natural and right now

In terms of trying too hard...totally lol. i have a habit of biting off more than i can chew, and i ve thrown out alot of new tricks i ve learnt with this so far, most i can yet do at the full speed of the track but im hopefully i can get them there as their not too far off. And hopefully when i break into melody from it ll sound that much even more ear grabbing smile.gif

We'll see if it works, but im quite excited as this could be the start of me getting over my biggest hurdle to date biggrin.gif

Cheers for all your advice


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jstcrsn
post Sep 5 2011, 11:48 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.698
Joined: 29-March 08
From: kansas, USA
Member No.: 4.733



I don't know the backing ,but I was wondering if you could keep the drums moving the song and change the guitar , play the chords rather then riffing underneith the solo,this would open up your guitar solo with many more possibilities

This post has been edited by jstcrsn: Sep 5 2011, 11:49 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Sep 6 2011, 12:43 PM
Post #9


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Sep 5 2011, 11:48 PM) *
I don't know the backing ,but I was wondering if you could keep the drums moving the song and change the guitar , play the chords rather then riffing underneith the solo,this would open up your guitar solo with many more possibilities



In this instance i cant, as it a song my band have written and they really wouldnt like me to change things haha
But your quite right, i find playing over chords SO much easier. But still this should be a good exercise smile.gif i cant wait to get back on my guitar and continue writing this


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Sep 6 2011, 04:19 PM
Post #10


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.112
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Some great replies wink.gif Here are some tips to add.

1.)A good solo is like a good story, it should have a clear Beginning/Middle/End

2.)Establish a "Melody Through Line" if possible. (A few tones/chops that repeat against the backing)

3.)Don't be afraid to repeat a lick especially if it's part of your "Melody Through Line"

4.)Pinch Harmonics are sort of like the period at the end of a sentence (sort of) you can use them anywhere but they add emphasis so adding them at the end of a phrase or scale run is often effective.

5.)Final/Biggest Tip: Soloing is all about "Tension and Release" you can build tension in several ways, running up scales, bends, and you can release it in several ways, resolving/hitting the root note, sliding down to an open string, etc.

Just some general tips, of course you could take the exact reverse of tip and still make a great solo smile.gif

Todd


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th March 2017 - 01:09 AM