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> Legato Question, Hammer on /pull offs
Michael AC
post Sep 6 2011, 03:31 AM
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Ben what is the main difference between legato and hammer on / pull offs?

Is there a technique difference I am not understanding? I am just starting your legato series.
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Ben Higgins
post Sep 6 2011, 08:30 AM
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Hi Michael, this is a good question !

Ok, well I would define legato as a series of notes that are played together smoothly with no breaks.. in other words, one note leads nicely into the next, and the next etc..

To play a passage 'legato' would require your fretting hand to hammer on and pull off with no (or very little) assistance with your picking hand to achieve the slippery legato sound.

So, legato does require the use of hammer ons and pull offs to achieve the effect.. but the overall term given to the effect that it produces is legato. I hope that makes sense ? smile.gif


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Michael AC
post Sep 9 2011, 04:20 AM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 6 2011, 03:30 AM) *
Hi Michael, this is a good question !

Ok, well I would define legato as a series of notes that are played together smoothly with no breaks.. in other words, one note leads nicely into the next, and the next etc..

To play a passage 'legato' would require your fretting hand to hammer on and pull off with no (or very little) assistance with your picking hand to achieve the slippery legato sound.

So, legato does require the use of hammer ons and pull offs to achieve the effect.. but the overall term given to the effect that it produces is legato. I hope that makes sense ? smile.gif


Makes sense. So legato is more feel and movement created from hammer on / pull off sequences?
Legato is more fluid if that is a good description?
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Sep 9 2011, 04:26 AM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 6 2011, 04:30 AM) *
Hi Michael, this is a good question !

Ok, well I would define legato as a series of notes that are played together smoothly with no breaks.. in other words, one note leads nicely into the next, and the next etc..

To play a passage 'legato' would require your fretting hand to hammer on and pull off with no (or very little) assistance with your picking hand to achieve the slippery legato sound.

So, legato does require the use of hammer ons and pull offs to achieve the effect.. but the overall term given to the effect that it produces is legato. I hope that makes sense ? smile.gif


Excellent explanation! smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Sep 9 2011, 09:02 AM
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QUOTE (Michael AC @ Sep 9 2011, 04:20 AM) *
Makes sense. So legato is more feel and movement created from hammer on / pull off sequences?
Legato is more fluid if that is a good description?


Yes that's right.. using hammer ons and pull offs and making the whole passage sound fluid biggrin.gif


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