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> Employing Dynamics In Your Practice Routines, How to?
Ivan Milenkovic
post Oct 29 2011, 01:23 PM
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A while ago, I started integrating dynamic picking into my playing routines in several ways:

For example: if I play a sequence of notes, I will practice them on 3 loudness levels: soft, medium and intense.

I noticed a good boost in picking dynamics after this in my regular playing. It's very important for a musician to learn how to make his passages "breathe". Employing these 3 levels while practicing on slower tempos, really helped me control the picking intensity.

Another interesting exercises is accenting some of the notes (for example, only arpeggiated notes over given chord) helps creating a good accent later on in playing.

Another interesting exercise is shifting accents within 4/4 measure, so that the accent/sequence always falls on different quarter.

Just some thoughts to share with you guys. If you have some similar observations on the topic, let us know, so we can learn from each other smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Oct 29 2011, 06:43 PM
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All of these exercises are CRUCIAL for the development of the expressive side of any musician! I usually practice this approach by playing classical music phrases and trying to play different notes at different dynamics. The second movement from Vivaldi's Winter - a very slow and melodic piece is one of my favorites for doing this! Give it a try and let me know what you think!


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Daniel Realpe
post Oct 30 2011, 03:55 AM
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this is great advice! definitely something to take into account,


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Ben Higgins
post Oct 30 2011, 10:08 AM
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This is something I totally agree with you guys on.. Ivan you've gone one step better and explained some ways to practice this. It's a very important aspect of guitar playing.. dynamics within a phrase. smile.gif


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JaxN4
post Oct 30 2011, 03:09 PM
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great idea Ivan...on it


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MonkeyDAthos
post Oct 30 2011, 04:41 PM
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this is also a very cool subject to train in band situation. not only with guitar but all instruments.

This post has been edited by MonkeyDAthos: Oct 30 2011, 04:42 PM


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