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> Practice Rountine Help?, I need help getting a practice rountine together...
s1m0n
post Nov 26 2011, 09:03 PM
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I usually play guitar at least an hour a day. But I don't really practice anything like scales or theory. I tend to noodle, or learn other people's songs. Which is fun and great, but it's not really giving me any real further knowledge of the guitar (well not as much as I would like).

What would you guys suggest I sit down and practice? I'd like to get to know the guitar neck better, and learn some scales that can be put into practice for solos and leads. Someone suggested making backing tracks, and finding scales that work with the backing track (finding a scale with the same notes in it as the riff backing it).

I play mostly play metal like Cannibal Corpse, BLS/Zakk Wylde, Pantera, Carcass. I've read that pentatonic scales are a good place to start? But hey, you guys are the experts around here! Let me know what you think, or any advice you have! Cheers!
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SirJamsalot
post Nov 26 2011, 09:24 PM
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You can't go wrong with learning your pentatonic "scales". Those are used in all Classic Rock and Metal - it's pretty much the sound from which all other sounds are based in those genres. If you like Zak, you like pentatonic!

Search the video archives for pentatonic workouts. Tons of great instructional material to get your feet wet.

I would also recommend beginning to learn all the notes on the neck of your guitar. Begin with the dots, and say their name whenever you begin a lick with that note as your root - just make it a habit and you'll be well on your way to learning your guitar!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Nov 26 2011, 09:57 PM
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Learning those things is very important. I think that you could use Ivan's workshops... he covered scales, arpeggios, modes and many other important things related to theory and harmony applied to the guitar. Check those series!


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Sinisa Cekic
post Nov 26 2011, 10:40 PM
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Learning new and old scales known to be very bored, but it is necessary! Don't waste your time on noodling! Make a plan ! Start from a minor pentatonic boxes,for example. Gabriel gave you a good suggestion, go on wink.gif


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Nihilist1
post Nov 26 2011, 11:16 PM
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If you don't practice often. Don't do this, but use it, and the links as a basis.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...c=41679&hl=


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Nov 27 2011, 12:58 AM
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Yes, pentatonic scale is a good place to start. Check out my Pentatonic Workshop Series for some practicing, or try to attend a video chat tomorrow, we will be doing some practicing of pentatonics there as well! smile.gif


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dark dude
post Nov 27 2011, 01:26 AM
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Yeah, the minor pentatonic would be a great place to start - Zakk is a massive fan of them.

Take everything in bite-sized chunks, so you can process it and so you don't burn out. Take perhaps 1 of the 5 pentatonic positions a week or every few days, memorise it and look into the theory behind them. Be able to name the notes you're playing and why they work with certain chords. Practice them over a metal (or any other genre you like) backing track off youtube, or you could use a BLS song and improvise over that with the pentatonic. Anything that isn't all work, but a bit of fun, too.

After the pentatonics you can look at the blues scale and then the major/minor scale smile.gif When you get to the major/minor scale, there'll be a bit more theory to get under your belt, but it's no big deal - just take your time! Whenever you come across something you don't understand, throw a post up on the forum.

This post has been edited by dark dude: Nov 27 2011, 01:28 AM


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s1m0n
post Nov 27 2011, 10:09 AM
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Thanks guys, this is all really good stuff and very useful. Once I've got my lemon oil and re-stringed and cleaned up my guitar, I'll be looking into these suggestions and start a "proper" practice routine!
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Todd Simpson
post Nov 27 2011, 10:27 AM
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The guys are dead on smile.gif Pentatonics are a great place to start. The variations of the pentatonic as well. Blues and Microtonal variants are an added bonus. There just tons of great licks that are based on pentatonic structures. Here is a KILLER lesson by GABRIEL where he breaks down the "shred" version of several Pentatonic licks.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Pentatonic-Shred-Licks/

Todd


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s1m0n
post Nov 27 2011, 02:06 PM
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That's a really good lesson, thanks for the advice so far! You guys rock! \m/
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Alex Feather
post Nov 30 2011, 04:54 AM
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I would suggest to learn sight reading it will help you a lot with a neck knowledge
You can start with a simple sight reading books for trumpet because it's in the same key as guitar
Here is one that helped me a lot
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=s...IwAQ#ps-sellers
You will start with a very simple whole notes and towards the end of this book you will be able to read simple melodies
there is a few levels so you can pick one you are comfortable with
Good luck! smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Nov 30 2011, 01:44 PM
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You can learn a lot from other people's songs as well! What's your approach on learning songs? I would recommend the following steps:

- Understand the structure
- See the key and time signature
- Understand the chord progressions for each separate part of the song
- Understand the lead parts and fills
- Link the lead parts with the harmony and see what sort of theoretical notions lie beneath it all.

Once you understood everything, start practicing each part slowly until it's done right from the perspective of speed and accuracy, interpretation and sound.

Then link the parts together and exercise them as a whole. There you go smile.gif

Now the main idea consists in the fact that you can draw a LOT of knowledge out of learning songs. Each bit of theoretical knowledge can be developed further.

For instance, you will find a certain chord progression in a song. Take that chord progression and see what chords it contains, what other positions you could use to play that chord progression, transpose it into other scales. This is just an example of the richness you can find in developing the concepts and ideas included in the simplest song out there! biggrin.gif

all the best mate, hope this helps smile.gif

Cosmin


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Nov 30 2011, 11:07 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Nov 30 2011, 01:44 PM) *
You can learn a lot from other people's songs as well! What's your approach on learning songs? I would recommend the following steps:

- Understand the structure
- See the key and time signature
- Understand the chord progressions for each separate part of the song
- Understand the lead parts and fills
- Link the lead parts with the harmony and see what sort of theoretical notions lie beneath it all.

Once you understood everything, start practicing each part slowly until it's done right from the perspective of speed and accuracy, interpretation and sound.

Then link the parts together and exercise them as a whole. There you go smile.gif

Now the main idea consists in the fact that you can draw a LOT of knowledge out of learning songs. Each bit of theoretical knowledge can be developed further.

For instance, you will find a certain chord progression in a song. Take that chord progression and see what chords it contains, what other positions you could use to play that chord progression, transpose it into other scales. This is just an example of the richness you can find in developing the concepts and ideas included in the simplest song out there! biggrin.gif

all the best mate, hope this helps smile.gif

Cosmin


Very nice concept Cosmin, this should be a general suggestion to all musicians! smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 1 2011, 07:16 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Nov 30 2011, 05:07 PM) *
Very nice concept Cosmin, this should be a general suggestion to all musicians! smile.gif


I must agree. This is quite good and broken down in to simple steps. Should be in the wiki!


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