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> Which Chords Are These?
Noober
post Dec 21 2011, 10:52 PM
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Hi. Noober´s here.
Practicing slow blues in A minor
by Laszlo Boross. Wondering which
those two-string chords in bar 4 are?

Happy X-mas
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Sinisa Cekic
post Dec 21 2011, 11:04 PM
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|---------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
|----------------------------------|
|--2----x----2----7--------5----|
|--0----x----0----5--------3----|
|---------------------------------|

This one ,mate ?

Ok, that's power chord.

Power chords are not really chords. A more correct name would be "power intervals" because they only contain two different notes- Root note and perfect 5th interval. In this graphic - A,A,D,C !


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Daniel Realpe
post Dec 22 2011, 01:12 AM
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yeah, in classical terms a chord is composed of 4 notes, root, third, fifth, and the doubling of one of these notes,

but in popular terms, whenever there's two notes, you call it a chord

and that is a POWER CHORD!

it consist of a root and a perfect fifth


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Alex Feather
post Dec 22 2011, 03:31 AM
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Some people call them 5 chords or 5th chords. I don't know what the proper terminology is. I call them Black Sabbath chords.


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Ben Higgins
post Dec 22 2011, 10:32 AM
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I would call them A5, D5 & C5. That's the way I always saw power chords written in guitar mags smile.gif


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Noober
post Dec 22 2011, 11:42 AM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Dec 22 2011, 10:32 AM) *
I would call them A5, D5 & C5. That's the way I always saw power chords written in guitar mags smile.gif


Hi Ben!

There are no fifths in these chords.
It´s C and E
& D & F#.

By the way. Your exercises are brilliant.
Noober
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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 22 2011, 11:52 AM
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Yes, this is 5th interval (interval: two notes ringing simultaneously). Root and fifth.

Example: A and E.

On distortion, these two notes came out more defined and consonant then other because of the nature of the fifth interval.

Here is one more example with another A added:


Here, you have 3 intervals ringing: from A (low E string) to E (fifth), from E to A (D string) (fourth), from A to A (octave). This is also powerchord, as all combined intervals are perfect and tend to have more strength and "power" then other intervals, because they aren't dissonant.



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