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Marcus Desaiha
post Dec 24 2011, 08:14 PM
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So I had an "Amp day" all day long yesterday. Went to four diffrent music stores and tried out several amps.

The one I fell for was the dual rectifier. It was just the thing I was looking for.
AMAZING amplifier, but so was the price-tag.


Though, I've noticed that they're alot cheaper in the states, so I was wondering if it is safe to import one of theese babies from the US and plug them in to a wall socket in Sweden? Or will the thing pop?
Since you got 110V in the states while we got juice worth of 210V here in Sweden coming out of our walls.

Do you need a voltage converter/transformer, or is it safe to just plug and play without one? I'd hate having to bring that to every gig I play though, it would be a burden!

Anybody in the EU here on GMC that has any knowledge in this area?
Please share your thoughts!

//Marcus

This post has been edited by Marcus Desaiha: Dec 24 2011, 08:15 PM


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GregH
post Dec 24 2011, 09:08 PM
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There are two different factors to consider. The first is voltage and the other is frequency.
An amplifier that runs on 110 volts would not be happy at all on 220 volts. Some amplifiers have transformers that are set up for different voltages and can be reconfigured for a different countries power grid.
The United States uses 60 hertz power and I believe that your country uses 50 hertz. It takes more iron in a transformer to work at a lower frequency so unless the transformer was designed for dual frequency use, it wouldn't be happy at a lower frequency then it was designed for.
Iron costs money, so most of the time something designed for use in the US is built with the cheapest teransformer that they can get away with and it would not adapt.
I have not worked on a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for a while, but as I remember they sell different versions for different voltages rather then having a transformer that would adapt (like Marshall usually does).
So the short answer is:
It would not work without a converter at all and;
Even with a converter the transformer most likely would not be happy with the 50 hz and would overheat and die.
Hope this helps.
Greg
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Andrew Cockburn
post Dec 24 2011, 09:41 PM
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I agree with Greg and would add that you will likely get dinged for import tax. Add that to the cost of a converter (which would probably need to be pretty hefty) and you probably won't save any money.

One possibility might be to have an amp tech swap out the transformer for you - that should be relatively easy if they could source the proper European transformer, but again, you probably won't save anything by the time you have done that.


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Marcus Desaiha
post Dec 25 2011, 12:22 AM
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Thanks for the answers guys, couldn't have asked for better ones!


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 25 2011, 12:46 AM
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Try to find second-hand one in Sweden, they are probably a bit cheaper then in stores, and they should be in good condition. These amps are pretty solid.


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Marcus Desaiha
post Dec 25 2011, 12:33 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Dec 25 2011, 12:46 AM) *
Try to find second-hand one in Sweden, they are probably a bit cheaper then in stores, and they should be in good condition. These amps are pretty solid.


I've been looking, but it seems that people aren't very keen on selling thoose amps, aint a mystery either.

Maybe you guys can give me a couple of suggestions of amplifiers I could ask for the next time I'm out testing them?
I'm not on a tight budget but I'm not very keen on paying 4250$ for a stack either.


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Nihilist1
post Dec 25 2011, 12:50 PM
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Orange and Laney are my personal favourites. BlackStar is a pretty noteworthy company as well.

Swedish Prog guitarist Fredrik Akesson(Opeth, Arch Enemy, Talisman) uses Blackstar, as well as Norwegian Black Metal Musician Ihsahn(Emperor). Give it a try. I don't know if the cleans are the best, but given Fredrik's tone when Opeth plays live, I would say it is pretty awesome.


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MickeM
post Dec 25 2011, 02:47 PM
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amps seem to add a lot to price when passing the Atlantic. So, getting a Marshall or an Orange here in Europe would be more economic than getting a Mesa. And to me Orange and Marshall seem overpriced in the US. Like getting a Marshall JVM410 in the US for $2000 then add VAT and tax + shipping and you made yourself a really bad deal compared to getting in from the UK/Germany or Sweden.

It could be worth a lot to you if you compare prices between USA/Sweden/UK/Germany. Just imagine the worth of each brand in each country. Being a fan of Marshall or Orange can be quite pricy living in the US. Same being a Mesa fan living in Sweden. What is it worth is up to the buyer. Still worth noticing that the same product can have odd values depending on where it's sold.



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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 26 2011, 01:37 AM
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Not sure, but if you are ready to pay at least half of that price, there are numerous amps at your disposal. If you want hi-gain metal tone, check out Peavey 6505+ or EVH 5105, these are really good amps.


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Alex Feather
post Dec 26 2011, 09:27 AM
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QUOTE (Marcus Desaiha @ Dec 24 2011, 07:14 PM) *
So I had an "Amp day" all day long yesterday. Went to four diffrent music stores and tried out several amps.

The one I fell for was the dual rectifier. It was just the thing I was looking for.
AMAZING amplifier, but so was the price-tag.


Though, I've noticed that they're alot cheaper in the states, so I was wondering if it is safe to import one of theese babies from the US and plug them in to a wall socket in Sweden? Or will the thing pop?
Since you got 110V in the states while we got juice worth of 210V here in Sweden coming out of our walls.

Do you need a voltage converter/transformer, or is it safe to just plug and play without one? I'd hate having to bring that to every gig I play though, it would be a burden!

Anybody in the EU here on GMC that has any knowledge in this area?
Please share your thoughts!

//Marcus

I had the same problem! I live in the US but going on tour to Europe very often mostly Russia the power difference is 110-220 you will have to buy a converter they aren't super expensive but you will change tubes a lot! Some Mesa boogie amps now making a switch from 110-220 on the back of the amp
I use to own two Mesa boogie heads single and dual
Look for used one I got single rectifier for $800 with a Marshall cabinet so you can find very good deals out there!
People are switching to quiter amps like 18 watts because Mesa is too loud so that's why you can buy them really cheap! Let me know if you want me to help you outandcheck the head for you I live in LA and can help you out!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Dec 26 2011, 09:51 AM
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What about the ENGL amps? They seem to be great and you have them closer (Germany).


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