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> How Do You Deal With A Point Where You're Stuck?
JTaylor
post Jan 6 2012, 11:55 AM
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I'd be interested if you all could tell me how you handle a sticking point in your playing. For me, it is 16th notes (and I don't even want to think what it will be like when I hit 16th triplets!). I tend to get obsessed about getting past it and practice it incessantly. I know that's not healthy but it seems to be the way I deal with it. A few instructors and fellow students told me not to be afraid to work on something else. That's good advice but I am concerned I will end up not coming back to it. If you take a break from a point where you are stuck, how long do you take? Hours, days, weeks?


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SpaseMoonkey
post Jan 6 2012, 12:20 PM
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QUOTE (JTaylor @ Jan 6 2012, 06:55 AM) *
I'd be interested if you all could tell me how you handle a sticking point in your playing. For me, it is 16th notes (and I don't even want to think what it will be like when I hit 16th triplets!). I tend to get obsessed about getting past it and practice it incessantly. I know that's not healthy but it seems to be the way I deal with it. A few instructors and fellow students told me not to be afraid to work on something else. That's good advice but I am concerned I will end up not coming back to it. If you take a break from a point where you are stuck, how long do you take? Hours, days, weeks?


For me it really depends. If I start to dig into the strings and be more aggressive with my playing I'll back down and noodle for a few minutes then go back if it happens again I put that practice aside till the next day.


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JaxN4
post Jan 6 2012, 12:56 PM
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slow the speed down until you CAN play it CLEAN...then gradually increase the speed, even if its by 2bpm, it's still progress.

Find your weakness... is it left hand co-ordination or right hand picking technique? Find the issue and do another different excercise to work on that and then come back to your 16th note thingy...

Thats how i have done it mate,

Don't chase the end result, relax and enjoy the Journey....

Cheers cool.gif

This post has been edited by JaxN4: Jan 6 2012, 12:58 PM


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 6 2012, 01:39 PM
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It's all about playing it as clean as possible, and speed will come in time. You should increase speed very gradually, so you do most of your repeats on slow tempos. Once you reach the point where you cannot play it with same precision as on low tempos, then you should give it time to settle, couple of hours, or one day, and then try again. Remember that precision is most important.

What's important? You have two notes on slow tempo, N1, and N2, and you have a micro pause between them. This little pause is the time needed for you to transfer to the other note, and pick it:

[email protected] notes: N1 - N2
[email protected] notes: N1 -- N2
[email protected] notes: N1 --- N2
[email protected] notes: N1 ---- N2
[email protected] notes: N1 ----- N2

Each time you increase the tempo without moving gradually, this little pause is getting bigger and bigger, and your notes are getting shorter and shorter. At some point you will get to so fast tempo, that you cannot play the note anymore, all that is left is pause time. This is where mistakes happen, and people usually get stuck, so they have to practice all over again.

If you take your time to go slowly through the repeats, and maintain that pause short, you will see that it will be much easier to reach higher tempos. Always be on the lookout for these pauses, they are the main reason people usually develop problems and don't play fluidly.



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dark dude
post Jan 6 2012, 06:23 PM
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It depends on what it is.

A friend once told me to never play to frustration, which becomes easier with time. You have to see learning guitar as a marathon.


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