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JTaylor
post Jan 12 2012, 12:27 PM
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After a couple of REC's, I have decided to learn "Little Finger Workout" by Dejan Farkas. I know Ivan, Ben, and others will be happy that I am using a metronome from the very start (my way just doesn't seem to be working out so well laugh.gif). I am playing at 60 BPM, which seems to be working out. My question is, how would you go about learning this? I would like to get the entire piece down at 60 before I increase the tempo on any of it. Is that the right way or should I learn one section and work on increasing the tempo on that one section (after the accuracy, of course)? Thanks for your help smile.gif


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Ben Higgins
post Jan 12 2012, 12:47 PM
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Hi Jon smile.gif

If you're planning on doing a REC of it then you'll have to be able to play the whole piece comfortably at one tempo.. but for the purposes of improving techniques in certain areas I like to push things further.

Once I've got the pattern of something sorted and I'm comfortable with the requirements of the technique involved, then I'll do very short bursts of a lick at higher speeds. This trains the brain and hands to react at a higher level of intensity, which is what you will be needing anyway to play faster.

However, and this is where it can get tricky, you need to be able to balance out doing the higher speed bursts with making sure your technique is still relaxed as possible. This is why we do it in bursts, so we don't wear ourselves out and tense up. The shorter period of movement means that we can still maintain a correct, natural and relaxed performance of the technique.

I'm a great believer in placing higher demands on yourself and making the body answer to the new demands, which it does. It's really amazing when we think about it.. how our bodies adapt to the requests we make of it. smile.gif


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 12 2012, 03:45 PM
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I'm currently working on a lesson called "Extreme Neoclassical" by Muris. I learnt the whole piece slowly and play it at a slower tempo. My next step is to increase the tempo of my playing. My approach to do it is dividing the lesson and working with the different parts as a loop over metronome. There are always some sections that are more difficult for us than other so it's better to take those sections and practice them alone with the metronome. I think that this way is more effective than playing the whole piece over a slower tempo.


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JTaylor
post Jan 12 2012, 05:04 PM
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Thanks guys! Yeah, I am going to do a REC eventually, but I'm not going to rush it. With everything going on (job, family, school, church), it will be a while laugh.gif


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Jan 12 2012, 06:23 PM
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Both Ben's and Gab's advices are excellent, and Gab gave a nice tip on how to practice, which I usually use too. Play the piece comfortably at one tempo, and increase speed, and when finding a problematic part, isolating that, and working on slower tempos only that part. The more you work on a piece, faster you will learn it obviously, so it's usually mostly about practice, practice, practice.


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JTaylor
post Jan 12 2012, 07:38 PM
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QUOTE (Ivan Milenkovic @ Jan 12 2012, 05:23 PM) *
Both Ben's and Gab's advices are excellent, and Gab gave a nice tip on how to practice, which I usually use too. Play the piece comfortably at one tempo, and increase speed, and when finding a problematic part, isolating that, and working on slower tempos only that part. The more you work on a piece, faster you will learn it obviously, so it's usually mostly about practice, practice, practice.


Thank you Ivan!


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Ben Higgins
post Jan 12 2012, 07:39 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jan 12 2012, 02:45 PM) *
I'm currently working on a lesson called "Extreme Neoclassical" by Muris.


Oh my God.. good luck !!! smile.gif


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Daniel Realpe
post Jan 12 2012, 08:33 PM
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Isolating problem spots it's really a good thing to do, you get the feel of how it should be done and then you comfortably execute it much better,

Then you piece it together to the previous bars, until you do the whole thing at one tempo, then move to the next tempo which is going to feel a lot easier once you've understood how to play the piece


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JTaylor
post Jan 12 2012, 08:37 PM
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QUOTE (Daniel Realpe @ Jan 12 2012, 07:33 PM) *
Isolating problem spots it's really a good thing to do, you get the feel of how it should be done and then you comfortably execute it much better,

Then you piece it together to the previous bars, until you do the whole thing at one tempo, then move to the next tempo which is going to feel a lot easier once you've understood how to play the piece


Thanks Daniel!


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Sinisa Cekic
post Jan 12 2012, 09:09 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jan 12 2012, 03:45 PM) *
I'm currently working on a lesson called "Extreme Neoclassical" by Muris. I learnt the whole piece slowly and play it at a slower tempo. My next step is to increase the tempo of my playing. My approach to do it is dividing the lesson and working with the different parts as a loop over metronome. There are always some sections that are more difficult for us than other so it's better to take those sections and practice them alone with the metronome. I think that this way is more effective than playing the whole piece over a slower tempo.


My approach is the same. Very nice and clear said Gabriel!!


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JTaylor
post Jan 12 2012, 11:16 PM
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[quote name='Gabriel Leopardi' date='Jan 12 2012, 02:45 PM' post='563133']
I'm currently working on a lesson called "Extreme Neoclassical" by Muris. I learnt the whole piece slowly and play it at a slower tempo.

Man, I would have to slow the tempo down to 60 BPY (beats per year!) laugh.gif


Thanks Sinisa!



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Todd Simpson
post Jan 12 2012, 11:30 PM
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QUOTE (JTaylor @ Jan 12 2012, 01:38 PM) *
Thank you Ivan!



Some really great advice in this thread! I'm not sure if I can add anything that hasnt' been said. If anything, I'd say listen to your hands/arms/body as you play and if it says "OUCH", take a short break. Sometimes, in our drive to get better, we push a bit to hard and this can result in serious permanent and even permanent injury. So play / practice your brains out! But keep in mind it's a physical activity like any other that you need to warmup to, cool down from, and take frequent breaks in the middle and stay hydrated smile.gif


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derper
post Jan 13 2012, 10:15 AM
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As a noob to GMC, I'll share my input, which is similar to the instructors....

Work out the entire piece, so you're at least familiar with it all the way through at a slower tempo first. Then, break down the individual parts, and work on them separately with a metronome, until you can get it up to a higher speed. THEN, try putting them together....even if you had the individual sections down, now you're faced with transitioning positions at a higher speed! Keep going back and forth, between "tuning up" the sections individually at a slightly higher tempo, and then running the entire piece a bit slower to make sure you can play it accurately.

I did this with a Muris lesson, "Country Picking Advanced". Still have a VERY long way to go before getting it up to 155bpm!!


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