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> Helpful Websites Part 2, How to get an online distribution for your music!
Alex Feather
post Jan 30 2012, 07:46 PM
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Hey guys! We all writing music and trying to make people hear it! We are living in time that online distribution is taking over and anybody can release their music and make some money! But what website to go with? How to get the most out of it?
I wanted to share some websites that will release your music on iTunes and other websites
1) Tunecore - Is a very cool website that will release your songs on iTunes, Amazon and many others the good thing about it is that your song will be live on iTunes in just a few days! Bad is that it's a bit expensive $50 for an album $10 for a single and you have to pay every year to keep your music on this websites
They don't provide an artist ping page so it's a little harder to get sales going
2) CD baby another giant does the same thing as a tunecore but no annual fees they will take percentage of your sales about 20%
and keep your music sign up fee is a little more than Tunecore but your music will be live forever (or until iTunes will go out of business)
3) IODA is probably the best one they won't charge you anything and your CD will be available in stores as a physical copy the only problem with them they are using soundscan to check your sales from previous releases and if it's not enough they won't accept you! I would give it a shot anyway!
4) Guitar9 records this website is working with instrumental music only and they do some promotion in their magazine and on the website they are also keeping your CD as a physical copy and taking only 10% from sales sign up fees are not too much for what you will get!
5) Soundcast.com seems like a good website but they are charging $6 a month and it doesn't seem to be worth it but you can give it a shot and let me know what do you think!
6) Catapult the cheapest online distribution website they will charge only $25 per album and after that take only 10% of your sales!
Personally I am working with Tunecore but planning on releasing my new album with someone else!
Goodluck!


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Jan 31 2012, 10:41 AM
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A few additional things to consider for those who want to use a digital re/distributor:

ISRC (International Standard Recording Code)
This is an alphanumeric code that provides a unique identification of a recording - it gives details of the country, year of first release, record label id and so on. ISRCs are issued to a record label by the appropriate country's PRC and you can register yourself as a record label if you want: some PRCs charge a small fee (the USA charges). some don't and will give the code for free (the UK doesn't charge). Apple, Amazon and other distributors expect any material to have an ISRC and will not stock with out it. Many broadcasters - radio stations etc - will not broadcast any post 2005 material that doesn't have ISRC. Without an ISRC it is more difficult for a broadcaster to provide accurate playlists and so its also difficult for them to pay performance rights. If you don't have an ISRC and don't want to be a record label some re/distributors like CDBaby will provide you with theirs. That means that your release becomes part of their recording catalogue and you will need to receive your performance rights from them.

So you need to make a choice:

1/ Get and use your own ISRC

or

2/ Let the re/distributor apply theirs and be part of their catalogue

Note - a little bit more on ISRC below

International and National Product Codes - UPC/EAN
These are the bar codes that are on the CD sleeve. It identifies the actual product and often helps a distributor manage it's wharehousing, distribution and point of sale. Some digital distributors - Amazon is one - insist on a bar code. Rather like an ISRC you can apply for them or you can trust the re/distributor to apply theirs.

Format
Some re/distributors will only accept 16/44.1 wave files either as a PMCD or as a digital upload. Most will use this to then transcode to an AAS or mp3 for the distributor. It is rarely a good idea to send them mp3 - even so called high quality ones - as the re/distributor may still further transcode.

Masters
Most re/distributors prefer you to supply mastered audio as a redbook PMCD or DDP. As part of this you should include a PQ printout with accurate timings, ISRCs and any CD text. Some re/distributors can get this from the PMCD's TOC or direct from the DDP2 (note DDP1 doesn't do this). Most will expect your PMCD to be fully redbook compliant and that it has passed the BLER. Some re/distributors will not accept a PMCD with hidden tracks or with mixed media etc (ie a scarlet/orange/purple book etc PMCD)

Note that it is rare for an mp3 to have embedded ISRC: ISRC is a metatag and can only be edited as a subcode to an mp3. Most mp3 encoders will not let you edit the appropriate subcode region. Also note that mp3s do not carry PQ information and/or fades between tracks.

If your audio PMCD is not already mastered then some re/distributors will recomend that you do so and some will suggest their own mastering facility. People have had mixed experiences of these in-house mastering services and you should consider carefully if you wish to use it or if you wish to use an independent mastering studio or if you want to attempt to produce your own redbook compliant PMCD.

Copyright approval
You may be required to provide documentation that you either own the IP for your audio or that you have the owner's permission to use it. So if you have sampled someone else's audio you may need documentation that establishes your right to do so. Similarly, if you have included any cover version you may need to provide evidence that you have appropriate clearance.



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Alex Feather
post Jan 31 2012, 05:10 PM
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QUOTE (tonymiro @ Jan 31 2012, 09:41 AM) *
A few additional things to consider for those who want to use a digital re/distributor:

ISRC (International Standard Recording Code)
This is an alphanumeric code that provides a unique identification of a recording - it gives details of the country, year of first release, record label id and so on. ISRCs are issued to a record label by the appropriate country's PRC and you can register yourself as a record label if you want: some PRCs charge a small fee (the USA charges). some don't and will give the code for free (the UK doesn't charge). Apple, Amazon and other distributors expect any material to have an ISRC and will not stock with out it. Many broadcasters - radio stations etc - will not broadcast any post 2005 material that doesn't have ISRC. Without an ISRC it is more difficult for a broadcaster to provide accurate playlists and so its also difficult for them to pay performance rights. If you don't have an ISRC and don't want to be a record label some re/distributors like CDBaby will provide you with theirs. That means that your release becomes part of their recording catalogue and you will need to receive your performance rights from them.

So you need to make a choice:

1/ Get and use your own ISRC

or

2/ Let the re/distributor apply theirs and be part of their catalogue

Note - a little bit more on ISRC below

International and National Product Codes - UPC/EAN
These are the bar codes that are on the CD sleeve. It identifies the actual product and often helps a distributor manage it's wharehousing, distribution and point of sale. Some digital distributors - Amazon is one - insist on a bar code. Rather like an ISRC you can apply for them or you can trust the re/distributor to apply theirs.

Format
Some re/distributors will only accept 16/44.1 wave files either as a PMCD or as a digital upload. Most will use this to then transcode to an AAS or mp3 for the distributor. It is rarely a good idea to send them mp3 - even so called high quality ones - as the re/distributor may still further transcode.

Masters
Most re/distributors prefer you to supply mastered audio as a redbook PMCD or DDP. As part of this you should include a PQ printout with accurate timings, ISRCs and any CD text. Some re/distributors can get this from the PMCD's TOC or direct from the DDP2 (note DDP1 doesn't do this). Most will expect your PMCD to be fully redbook compliant and that it has passed the BLER. Some re/distributors will not accept a PMCD with hidden tracks or with mixed media etc (ie a scarlet/orange/purple book etc PMCD)

Note that it is rare for an mp3 to have embedded ISRC: ISRC is a metatag and can only be edited as a subcode to an mp3. Most mp3 encoders will not let you edit the appropriate subcode region. Also note that mp3s do not carry PQ information and/or fades between tracks.

If your audio PMCD is not already mastered then some re/distributors will recomend that you do so and some will suggest their own mastering facility. People have had mixed experiences of these in-house mastering services and you should consider carefully if you wish to use it or if you wish to use an independent mastering studio or if you want to attempt to produce your own redbook compliant PMCD.

Copyright approval
You may be required to provide documentation that you either own the IP for your audio or that you have the owner's permission to use it. So if you have sampled someone else's audio you may need documentation that establishes your right to do so. Similarly, if you have included any cover version you may need to provide evidence that you have appropriate clearance.

Very good advice!!! Everything you have mentioned is absolutely right!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 31 2012, 11:23 PM
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Great info guys! I have been using tunecore and I've been happy with it. That Guitar9 website looks cool for our instrumental music. I'll investigate it! Thanks for this great thread Alex! smile.gif


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Alex Feather
post Feb 1 2012, 12:35 AM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Jan 31 2012, 10:23 PM) *
Great info guys! I have been using tunecore and I've been happy with it. That Guitar9 website looks cool for our instrumental music. I'll investigate it! Thanks for this great thread Alex! smile.gif

My pleasure man!


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