Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Groove Metal/metalcore, Playing in the style of bands such as lamb of god
Narzsa
post Feb 10 2012, 12:32 AM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



Hi guys,

It's been a while since I posted but I ve been practicing hard and thanks to guitar masterclass I'm a proper lil shredder now :-) my band is quite impressed

Any way now I'm more confident on that front I wanted to get back into writing some rythme pieces and ideally in the style of bands such as my favourite, lamb of God. I ve been looking at the lessons on here, listening and looking at their songs to try and piece their playing in style, hoping to be able to write in the same vein

So far I ve noticed they hang alot around the 12 fret, use diminished sounds, open strings, triplets alot. They also like to vary a rift with about 4 different variations per piece and generally don't cover that much of the same ground on the same song.

I was wondering if any one else noticed any such tricks they employ me that could help you me? :-)


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Uncreator
post Feb 10 2012, 01:57 AM
Post #2


Fire Up The Blades, Moderator
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 8.933
Joined: 6-March 07
From: St. Petersburg, Florida
Member No.: 1.304



Well, to me any of those bands that are known for 'grooves' implement a "triplet feel" or "swing feel" to their riffs.

Triplet feel means your phrasing accents groups of three, but you aren't actually playing triplets, gives a different feel, more agressive and straight forward. The swing feel is underrated, more common in Jazz and Blues, adding the swing style of phrasing can give a riff energy and a subtle bombastic quality when played with heavy riffs.

But truthfully, there techniques dont lie in anything as easily defined as the above - its all about the riff. There best tool is there mind, and their ears, you just know how to phrase it, how to write it, and the easiest way to learn this, in all honestly, is too listen to as much music as possible.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Feb 10 2012, 05:58 AM
Post #3


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.747
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Good point! Just try to listen to as much of their stuff as you can and then learn as much of it as you can. Next thing you know, when you want to create something with that vibe, you will find it just sorta happens.

Todd

QUOTE (The Uncreator @ Feb 9 2012, 07:57 PM) *
Well, to me any of those bands that are known for 'grooves' implement a "triplet feel" or "swing feel" to their riffs.

Triplet feel means your phrasing accents groups of three, but you aren't actually playing triplets, gives a different feel, more agressive and straight forward. The swing feel is underrated, more common in Jazz and Blues, adding the swing style of phrasing can give a riff energy and a subtle bombastic quality when played with heavy riffs.

But truthfully, there techniques dont lie in anything as easily defined as the above - its all about the riff. There best tool is there mind, and their ears, you just know how to phrase it, how to write it, and the easiest way to learn this, in all honestly, is too listen to as much music as possible.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Feb 10 2012, 10:27 AM
Post #4


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



Very interesting stuff their about their use (or non use as it were) of triplets, but cheers for the advice guys. I'm definitely thinking I might learn a few albums (I already listen to them loads ;-)) So and see what rubs off :-)


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ZakkWylde
post Feb 10 2012, 10:50 AM
Post #5


Learning Tone Master
Group Icon

Group: MVC
Posts: 3.185
Joined: 22-June 07
From: Germany
Member No.: 2.164



Make sure to implement a 6/8 rythm from time to time, LOG tend to do that a lot


--------------------


Gear:
- Jackson USA Select KV2 King V with EMG 81/85
- Gibson Les Paul Custom Arctic White with EMG 81/85
- Ibanez Rg 8527 J Custom 7-String with DiMarzio Evolution and Air Norton

- Peavey 6505+ head with Marshall 1960AV 4x12 cab
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Practice Amp
- Dunlop Crybaby From Hell, Maxon OD808, Boss TU-2, MXR CarbonCopy, ISP Decimator, MXR Custom Audio Electronics Booster

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ZakkWylde
post Feb 10 2012, 12:22 PM
Post #6


Learning Tone Master
Group Icon

Group: MVC
Posts: 3.185
Joined: 22-June 07
From: Germany
Member No.: 2.164



Also keep in mind that a lot of the groove comes from Chris Adlers unique drums, the best riffs won't help you much if your drummer plays standard beats underneath your possibly awesome riffs...


--------------------


Gear:
- Jackson USA Select KV2 King V with EMG 81/85
- Gibson Les Paul Custom Arctic White with EMG 81/85
- Ibanez Rg 8527 J Custom 7-String with DiMarzio Evolution and Air Norton

- Peavey 6505+ head with Marshall 1960AV 4x12 cab
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Practice Amp
- Dunlop Crybaby From Hell, Maxon OD808, Boss TU-2, MXR CarbonCopy, ISP Decimator, MXR Custom Audio Electronics Booster

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Feb 10 2012, 12:36 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



QUOTE (ZakkWylde @ Feb 10 2012, 09:50 AM) *
Make sure to implement a 6/8 rythm from time to time, LOG tend to do that a lot


Yea I ve noticed they like to avoid 4/4 timings. Any tips for improving my sense of timing? I especially with odd timing such as 6/8


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ZakkWylde
post Feb 10 2012, 01:02 PM
Post #8


Learning Tone Master
Group Icon

Group: MVC
Posts: 3.185
Joined: 22-June 07
From: Germany
Member No.: 2.164



6/8 is not so much an odd timing, you just need to get the feel for it. On most riffs you don't even realise that you went out of the 4/4 pattern while writing it because you riff has a span over 3 bars counting in 4/4. 3 bars of 4/4 gives you room to put in two 6/8 bars while still counting in the 4/4 measure (3x4/4=12/4 = 2x6/8).

That might not be a musical approach as I don't know any theory but it works that way for me. If you want to I can send you a guitar pro file with one of my bands own riffs in 6/8 so you can get the picture of what I am saying. Just PM me


--------------------


Gear:
- Jackson USA Select KV2 King V with EMG 81/85
- Gibson Les Paul Custom Arctic White with EMG 81/85
- Ibanez Rg 8527 J Custom 7-String with DiMarzio Evolution and Air Norton

- Peavey 6505+ head with Marshall 1960AV 4x12 cab
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Practice Amp
- Dunlop Crybaby From Hell, Maxon OD808, Boss TU-2, MXR CarbonCopy, ISP Decimator, MXR Custom Audio Electronics Booster

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Feb 10 2012, 01:11 PM
Post #9


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



QUOTE (ZakkWylde @ Feb 10 2012, 12:02 PM) *
6/8 is not so much an odd timing, you just need to get the feel for it. On most riffs you don't even realise that you went out of the 4/4 pattern while writing it because you riff has a span over 3 bars counting in 4/4. 3 bars of 4/4 gives you room to put in two 6/8 bars while still counting in the 4/4 measure (3x4/4=12/4 = 2x6/8).

That might not be a musical approach as I don't know any theory but it works that way for me. If you want to I can send you a guitar pro file with one of my bands own riffs in 6/8 so you can get the picture of what I am saying. Just PM me


You know I never thought of that way. Ironically when I was writing a new rift in their style last night I drifted into exactly what you described with the timing. I just presumed my timing was off due to how much I was doing and cursed it, but that more makes sense now.
Yea why not :-) every thing helps, cheers


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cosmin Lupu
post Feb 10 2012, 06:58 PM
Post #10


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 22.808
Joined: 14-June 10
From: Bucharest
Member No.: 10.636



Well, wouldn't wanna come up with my own stuff here, but here's an example of how I divided 6/8 in a riff tongue.gif let me know if you like it:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Djent-Time-Signatures/



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Narzsa
post Feb 11 2012, 01:18 AM
Post #11


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 84
Joined: 9-May 11
Member No.: 12.778



QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Feb 10 2012, 05:58 PM) *
Well, wouldn't wanna come up with my own stuff here, but here's an example of how I divided 6/8 in a riff tongue.gif let me know if you like it:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Djent-Time-Signatures/


Cheers cosmin, i think i ll check that out. Really loving the sound of the rift used in it biggrin.gif

Out of interesting, when you write in 6/8 (or any other for that mater) how do you keep track. Do you count as you play/write until you ease into it? or do you use a metronome and accent the start as a tell? just trying to figure out what builds the strongest sense of time


--------------------
Current Setup:

Dean VMNT1
Boss GT10
ENGL Screamer 50 watt Combo

\m/
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 18th January 2017 - 07:04 AM