Reply to this topicStart new topic
> "weak Spots" How To Get Rid Of Them?
Alex Feather
post Feb 14 2012, 05:09 PM
Post #1


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 4.332
Joined: 21-November 11
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 14.398



Hey guys! I have heard musicians talking about weak spots for a while now and decided to make a little post about getting rid of them!
Well first of all there is no such thing as a weak spot! If it is weak means you haven't been practicing it long enough and haven't mastered it yet! Some people can get it faster than you, but it doesn't mean that it's weak! You just need more time!
When I started playing guitar I've been told to quit music because I had too many "Weak Spots" and just couldn't get it! Even my teacher were telling me to quit and do something else! It encouraged me even more! I spent many hours practicing guitar and proud of what I achieved! Just keep doing it, because practice makes perfect and if you have a clear goal in your mind you will get there!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Dinaga
post Feb 14 2012, 07:43 PM
Post #2


Learning Tone Seeker
*

Group: Members
Posts: 627
Joined: 7-August 11
From: Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Member No.: 13.558



Great thread Alex!
I admire you for enduring all that! I can't believe a TEACHER told you to give up! He is the one who should be giving up because he obviously failed in his profession. And look at you now, you rock! Respect, mate!

And about flaws... oooh I had a ton! I got rid of some but still have some. However I'm aware of them and will try to resolve smile.gif

Here are some flaws I got rid of:
- Playing power chord riffs with upstrokes - now I use downstrokes for obvious reasons (more natural and easier, gives better "chug" sound, provides the ability to palm mute etc.)
- Not using regular alternate picking and mixing it with sweep picking in some situations (for example, while playing a scale from higher to lower string)
- Being generally impatient with any technique and playing it faster but "dirtier", which includes practicing new songs at higher speeds and not learning them properly
- Not muting the string effectively, now I use both hands to mute strings I don't play
- Not paying attention to the fingering and playing "on the fly", which prevented higher speeds
- Probably many more I can't remember now...

The hardest "weak spot" to fix was my ultra-bad alternate picking technique. After 3 years of bad picking, I decided to start over from the beginning, forcing myself to do perfectly accurate alternate picking. Today I can immediately "feel" if I do it wrong. And usually when I do it wrong, it's because I play something faster than I can and my brain gets confused wink.gif

All in all, I completely agree that everything is possible with dedication, motivation and hard work.

There are two biggest flaws in my opinion:
1. Not noticing a flaw
2. Noticing a flaw but ignoring it

Everything else is a success smile.gif

This post has been edited by Dinaga: Feb 14 2012, 07:44 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
derper
post Feb 14 2012, 09:05 PM
Post #3


Learning Tone Master
*

Group: Members
Posts: 691
Joined: 8-November 11
From: Portland Oregon
Member No.: 14.316



Ha! I have to admit, my comment in yesterday's video chat may be a slight "inspiration" towards this thread!! tongue.gif


But, even though I said that sweep picking is one of my "weak points", I TOTALLY agree with Alex!! It's only "weak" at this moment, but I have the CHOICE to improve on it or just "let it be". Luckily, even though I said it's my "weak point", I do understand that we all have the potential to become as great as we will let ourselves!!


I'll use myself, in a recent example. Heck, I've only been at GMC since November, but I absolutely LOVE it!! One of my first lessons (Muris': Country Picking Advanced) challenged me in several ways. The first of which, was the "chicken pickin" riff that he throws in the lesson at several points.

I had NEVER sat down and actually tried to learn "chicken pickin". Of course, it felt totally awkward at first, almost like flipping my guitar around and trying to play left-handed (I do this every once and again, to remind myself how far I've come, and that ANYTHING is possible to learn if you try!!). I sat down with a metronome and played that riff super slow, but keeping it "in time" as much as possible (difficult with new techniques, but it's still important not to let yourself get too far out of time!). After a bit, I could kind of get it slowly. By the end of the week, I was much better. Now, it "ain't no thang" to throw that riff down at 130-140 bpms near flawlessly, and with "soul". I can certainly work on more advance chicken pickin', but it was a recent example of taking a "weak point" and just LEARNING IT!!

When I say I have a "weak point" I fully acknowledge that I CAN turn it around!! But, not everyone feels this way/knows this, so this thread and the concept that Alex is talking about is VERY IMPORTANT TO ALL PLAYERS!! Don't build any "walls" for your playing and growth!! Get in the habit of building on your "weak points", so that you KNOW that you can accomplish and learn almost anything, if you try hard enough and practice! And we all have the advantage of the GMC community, so we can ask questions, share tips, and even request feedback from video takes.


Thanks Alex!! Great topic!


--------------------



Check out my awesome Nintendo Cover-band, EMULATOR!!
http://www.reverbnation.com/emulator

Now.....go practice!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Alex Feather
post Feb 15 2012, 05:40 PM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 4.332
Joined: 21-November 11
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 14.398



QUOTE (derper @ Feb 14 2012, 08:05 PM) *
Ha! I have to admit, my comment in yesterday's video chat may be a slight "inspiration" towards this thread!! tongue.gif


But, even though I said that sweep picking is one of my "weak points", I TOTALLY agree with Alex!! It's only "weak" at this moment, but I have the CHOICE to improve on it or just "let it be". Luckily, even though I said it's my "weak point", I do understand that we all have the potential to become as great as we will let ourselves!!


I'll use myself, in a recent example. Heck, I've only been at GMC since November, but I absolutely LOVE it!! One of my first lessons (Muris': Country Picking Advanced) challenged me in several ways. The first of which, was the "chicken pickin" riff that he throws in the lesson at several points.

I had NEVER sat down and actually tried to learn "chicken pickin". Of course, it felt totally awkward at first, almost like flipping my guitar around and trying to play left-handed (I do this every once and again, to remind myself how far I've come, and that ANYTHING is possible to learn if you try!!). I sat down with a metronome and played that riff super slow, but keeping it "in time" as much as possible (difficult with new techniques, but it's still important not to let yourself get too far out of time!). After a bit, I could kind of get it slowly. By the end of the week, I was much better. Now, it "ain't no thang" to throw that riff down at 130-140 bpms near flawlessly, and with "soul". I can certainly work on more advance chicken pickin', but it was a recent example of taking a "weak point" and just LEARNING IT!!

When I say I have a "weak point" I fully acknowledge that I CAN turn it around!! But, not everyone feels this way/knows this, so this thread and the concept that Alex is talking about is VERY IMPORTANT TO ALL PLAYERS!! Don't build any "walls" for your playing and growth!! Get in the habit of building on your "weak points", so that you KNOW that you can accomplish and learn almost anything, if you try hard enough and practice! And we all have the advantage of the GMC community, so we can ask questions, share tips, and even request feedback from video takes.


Thanks Alex!! Great topic!

Yep! You have inspired this post smile.gif
It's a great idea to always challenge yourself! There was no guitar player who just woke up one day and started playing! It took a lot of time and each one of us can be the great one just need to work on it!


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Feb 17 2012, 12:19 PM
Post #5


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.785
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



Interesting thread ! smile.gif

There's 2 ways of looking at things..

There is a way that Steve Vai advocates, and I have big respect for this approach, which is to ignore your weaknesses (to a point, I imagine) and pour your energy into developing your strengths. It's a quick way of digging into finding your own sound and getting some good results from the guitar. So although picking may not be your strength, legato might be..

Both Vai and Satch are not strong pickers or even sweepers, but they excel at melody, legato, whammy bar use and composing.

The other way is just like this thread suggests, working on your weakness until they are no longer weaknesses. I think you can take a bit of both approaches and cultivate the sound you want smile.gif

I have a habit of focusing on my weaknesses until not only am I better at them, but I excel at them and they are my new strengths. At least, that's what I tell myself ! wink.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Alex Feather
post Feb 17 2012, 10:58 PM
Post #6


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 4.332
Joined: 21-November 11
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 14.398



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Feb 17 2012, 11:19 AM) *
Interesting thread ! smile.gif

There's 2 ways of looking at things..

There is a way that Steve Vai advocates, and I have big respect for this approach, which is to ignore your weaknesses (to a point, I imagine) and pour your energy into developing your strengths. It's a quick way of digging into finding your own sound and getting some good results from the guitar. So although picking may not be your strength, legato might be..

Both Vai and Satch are not strong pickers or even sweepers, but they excel at melody, legato, whammy bar use and composing.

The other way is just like this thread suggests, working on your weakness until they are no longer weaknesses. I think you can take a bit of both approaches and cultivate the sound you want smile.gif

I have a habit of focusing on my weaknesses until not only am I better at them, but I excel at them and they are my new strengths. At least, that's what I tell myself ! wink.gif

I wouldn't agree with you about Steve Vai
He is a great sweeper and picker I did a recording with him and got a chance to see him jamming he is crazy! I don't think it gets better than him
His technique is absolutely unbelievable and he can play in any style of music
It just takes time to practice it all and really master it
I think it's also a good idea to challenge yourself when practicing


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 27th March 2017 - 05:57 AM