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> Scale Generator, Using the Scale Generator
Mike RR24
post Apr 29 2012, 10:39 PM
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I have a question regarding the scale generator here at GMC.

I'm looking at a lesson by Lale called Ozzy Osbourne Style.

The soloing is also being done using Gm pentatonic, G minor, and G blues scale.

Now on his lesson notes he has these scales listed and is showing every position on the fretboard.

This is confusing to me so I go to our scale generator and put in G minor scale and look at the first position, then fill the next etc.

I know the root notes are in green and show the start and end of the scale right?

Are all the patterns the same or do I just have to figure that out?

When I look at all the positions on the finger board it confuses the crap out of me.

Maybe I need more work on understanding the scales. Any ideas?

I thought maybe when I tackle a lesson I go try to learn the scales that the lesson is based off of. Is this a good idea or a waste of time? Thanks.. I know I'm not explaining it right probably. Thanks guys.. Any input would be appreciated.

I think where my confusion comes in is, I can take one scale at a time and learn the positions one at a time.
I can't seem to figure out how to connect them together. Can you be playing in one and go to another one?

One more thing I almost forgot.

Am - Dm - Am - G - C
Am - E - Am - Dm - Am/E - FM7 - G - C
Dm - Am - Dm - E - Am - F - Dm - G - C

Are those keys above Minor or Major. I can't seem to figure out if Am is a major or minor.

This post has been edited by Mike RR24: Apr 29 2012, 10:47 PM


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dark dude
post Apr 29 2012, 11:09 PM
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QUOTE (Mike RR24 @ Apr 29 2012, 10:39 PM) *
I know the root notes are in green and show the start and end of the scale right?

Yes and yes.
QUOTE
Are all the patterns the same or do I just have to figure that out?

The scales here (minor, minor pentatonic and blues) are all very similar in structure. If analysed, all the notes of the G minor pentatonic and G blues scales will appear in the G minor scale. The blues scale simply takes one note away from the minor to form the blues scale and the minor pentatonic takes away that same note, plus one more, to form the minor pentatonic.

The reason I know this is because these scales are common in the music I play and it's a common question (so I've seen this explained to me a lot of times).

So you can either learn the minor scale, then subtract the notes to get the other two, or learn the minor petatonic and add notes to get the other two, or learn the blues scale and add or take away a note to get the other two. I think it'd be more important to learn about intervals and see how they differ here, to illustrate scales better. It's particular intervals and their corresponding unique sounds that allow you to identify scales and make connections such as these.
QUOTE
When I look at all the positions on the finger board it confuses the crap out of me.

Divide it up into shapes, and slowly digest it in small pieces.
QUOTE
I thought maybe when I tackle a lesson I go try to learn the scales that the lesson is based off of. Is this a good idea or a waste of time? Thanks.. I know I'm not explaining it right probably. Thanks guys.. Any input would be appreciated.

It's a very good idea to do this, as you can then improvise over the backing track (since you know the scales) if you wanted to, you'd understand what chords work with what scales and if you were to write something in a similar style, you could employ the same ideas.
QUOTE
I think where my confusion comes in is, I can take one scale at a time and learn the positions one at a time.
I can't seem to figure out how to connect them together. Can you be playing in one and go to another one?

As I said before, the 3 scales here are very similar, so you can go in and out of them, but sticking to particular scales for particular sections will give you particular sounds.

Always divide what you need to learn into smaller, easier to swallow pieces. If you take a look at intervals and how a few scales are constructed, you should start to see the intervals pop up over the fretboard, and how they keep repeating over and over. Look at a small section of the fretboard vertically and horizontally, even diagonally - you will notice patterns and get a better feel for how everything fits.
QUOTE
One more thing I almost forgot.

Am - Dm - Am - G - C
Am - E - Am - Dm - Am/E - FM7 - G - C
Dm - Am - Dm - E - Am - F - Dm - G - C

Are those keys above Minor or Major. I can't seem to figure out if Am is a major or minor.

Am would be A minor, A would be A major, the same logic applies to the rest of them.

Let me know if there are things you don't understand, or if I missed the point of one of your questions!


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Mike RR24
post Apr 29 2012, 11:30 PM
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QUOTE (dark dude @ Apr 29 2012, 04:09 PM) *
Yes and yes.

The scales here (minor, minor pentatonic and blues) are all very similar in structure. If analysed, all the notes of the G minor pentatonic and G blues scales will appear in the G minor scale. The blues scale simply takes one note away from the minor to form the blues scale and the minor pentatonic takes away that same note, plus one more, to form the minor pentatonic.

The reason I know this is because these scales are common in the music I play and it's a common question (so I've seen this explained to me a lot of times).

So you can either learn the minor scale, then subtract the notes to get the other two, or learn the minor petatonic and add notes to get the other two, or learn the blues scale and add or take away a note to get the other two. I think it'd be more important to learn about intervals and see how they differ here, to illustrate scales better. It's particular intervals and their corresponding unique sounds that allow you to identify scales and make connections such as these.

Divide it up into shapes, and slowly digest it in small pieces.

It's a very good idea to do this, as you can then improvise over the backing track (since you know the scales) if you wanted to, you'd understand what chords work with what scales and if you were to write something in a similar style, you could employ the same ideas.

As I said before, the 3 scales here are very similar, so you can go in and out of them, but sticking to particular scales for particular sections will give you particular sounds.

Always divide what you need to learn into smaller, easier to swallow pieces. If you take a look at intervals and how a few scales are constructed, you should start to see the intervals pop up over the fretboard, and how they keep repeating over and over. Look at a small section of the fretboard vertically and horizontally, even diagonally - you will notice patterns and get a better feel for how everything fits.

Am would be A minor, A would be A major, the same logic applies to the rest of them.

Let me know if there are things you don't understand, or if I missed the point of one of your questions!


Thanks Dark Dude for your reply. You helped me a lot. I know I have read about intervals before but felt a little hazy with them. I'll look over it again. Thanks for your answers. I appreciate it.


--------------------
Michael Connell - Ciudad Juarez Chihuahua, Mexico

Gear: Jackson Pro RR24.
Ibanez XPT700.
Mexican Fender Strat 2008 Model.
Marshall MA 100 Watt Head w/Crate Blackheart slanted cab 300 Watts.
Line 6 Spider III 75 Watt
Digitech Metal Master Heavy Metal Distortion Pedal.
THD Hotplate 16 Ohms.
BOSS BR-1600CD Home Studio
DigiTech GSP1101 Guitar Preamp/Effects Processor
Digitech Control2 Remote Foot Controller
TC-Helicon VoiceWorks Plus Vocal Processor
Switch-3 Pedal for VoiceWorks Plus Vocal Processor
ISP Technologies Decimator Noise Reduction Pedal
Go to the top of the page
 
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dark dude
post Apr 29 2012, 11:44 PM
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QUOTE (Mike RR24 @ Apr 29 2012, 11:30 PM) *
Thanks Dark Dude for your reply. You helped me a lot. I know I have read about intervals before but felt a little hazy with them. I'll look over it again. Thanks for your answers. I appreciate it.

No problem, Mike.

The ideas behind intervals are easy to learn, so have a read of a few articles and then post your questions on the forums - good luck with it!


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