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> A Question About "sound"
MagicPicks
post May 12 2012, 09:51 AM
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Hi everyone!

I have just signed up on this site and I think it's really great! I have played acoustic guitar for a couple of years and are just starting out to learn electric. I believe this site can help me make good progress and I'm very excited! smile.gif

I do have a question about sound that I can't seem to find an awnser to. How is it that instructors are able to get a bands specific sound in a lesson and in another lesson they manage to capture the sound of another band? Is there an easy solution or is it necessary to have lots of gear in order to do this?

Well, that's what I'm most confused about at this point! smile.gif

Thanks for your help!
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Ben Higgins
post May 12 2012, 10:14 AM
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Hey there, welcome to GMC smile.gif

I'll try and answer from my personal perspective on it.. the other guys might see it differently. The biggest part of it is getting the composition to sound like the band or guitarist you're emulating. If you can get their trademarks in, then even if the tone isn't the same people will think 'Oh, that's just like...'

I'll use EQ on my amp to try to shape the tone to something as similar as possible to the original artist but this is the most tricky part for me as I don't use amp modelling at all, just my Marshall. So, for me.. I get the tone as close as I can but the thing that tips it in the right direction is getting the composition sounding enough like the artist so that any tonal differences almost don't matter smile.gif


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carminemarotta
post May 12 2012, 01:36 PM
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Ben, MagicPicks,

Very interesting topic, for me.

What does Ben mean with "composition sound?"

Regards
Carmine
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carminemarotta
post May 12 2012, 01:36 PM
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Ben, MagicPicks,

Very interesting topic, for me.

What does Ben mean with "composition sound?"

Regards
Carmine
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Cosmin Lupu
post May 12 2012, 01:37 PM
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I totally agree with Ben's approach - when I am doing lessons 'in the style of...' I am trying to emulate the vibe that music transmits, not by necessarily mimicking the tones exactly, but by incorporating rhythmic, harmonic and melodic elements specific to that artist or style.

It's not always easy to emulate tones when you are working with a analogue or tube based tools (I know Ben and myself are doing it), but I wouldn't trade them for anything digital (at least not yet).

The tube offers immense expressive power which can't be emulated by any digital device - at least that's how I feel. Tone is a combination of tool and hand (the hands come in with the unmistakeable dynamics)

Try and analyze the style of an artist first and see what makes it up from the musical perspective: rhythm, harmony and melody smile.gif



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Ben Higgins
post May 12 2012, 03:19 PM
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QUOTE (carminemarotta @ May 12 2012, 01:36 PM) *
Ben, MagicPicks,

Very interesting topic, for me.

What does Ben mean with "composition sound?"

Regards
Carmine



Hey Carmine.. what I mean is to get the composition (the piece of music that has been composed) to sound like something that the artist would play, or write. For example, if I was trying to do an Iron Maiden style lesson, then my first task is to compose something using the typical Maiden approaches and tricks smile.gif

That's the biggest part of sounding like someone else.. then you work on the tones smile.gif


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carminemarotta
post May 12 2012, 03:33 PM
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Very clear, Ben. I thought that tone was before sound.

Carmine
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MagicPicks
post May 12 2012, 04:25 PM
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Thank you for the anwsers! smile.gif

Sounds like it's the small details in the way you play that makes a lot of difference.

But if I want a specific sound/tone or how you put it, like Laszlo Boross lesson on the first solo in Comfortably Numb (https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Pink-Floyd-Comfortably-Numb-First-Solo/), do I need specific effect pedals for that?
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derper
post May 12 2012, 07:42 PM
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I love Ben and Cosmin's answers thus far!! For example, you can spend years and tens of thousands of dollars trying to re-create Stevie Ray Vaughn's classic tone. And yes, proper gear will "help".... but the SRV tone, was in his fingers. Stevie could have picked up a mexi strat, played through a modern fender blues jr and you would KNOW it was Stevie!! Sometimes it's the "touch", or a trademark riff/approach, but a true master (such as our instructors here at GMC!! wink.gif ) will re-create the overall "sound" of a famous band or artist!!

So, over the years, you will gain the experience to pick out more and more of what makes an artist's signature "sound".

Now I (like Cosmin mentioned) mainly use tube tone/analog rigs. EXCEPT for my little travel/practice amp (Roland micro cube, not tube, but similar controls) which is easy to dial in for a few diff tones. And also, I recently started using some Line 6 Pod Farm digital effects for home recording/recording GMC lessons and collabs.

I think that Ben/Cosmin mentioned that, because when trying to emulate tone you are technically a bit more "limited" by using your analog/tube rig, simply beacause you only have as many options as your amp/pedalboard will give you. As opposed to a digital processor/effects rack (like amplitube/pod farm, etc) which gives you a whole digital universe of different tones and options.

Which is why I like Ben/Cosmins response. Tone in tone, but know that the artists "sound" lies in his/her "touch", not simply their effects/amp/guitar/pickups/pedals. But, by having a decent knowledge of how to dial in and use different amps and effects, you'll be able to help achieve any sound you want!!


Like anything in life....the answer is "balance"!! tongue.gif


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Now.....go practice!!
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Cosmin Lupu
post May 14 2012, 10:32 AM
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Out of what I have heard, John Mayer for instance uses a single channel amp, called Two Rock which is a bucketful of money. No emulation comes close to such amp I guess, so trying to emulate his style would be closer at hand smile.gif



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