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> How Much Support As A Musician Do You Get From Your Environment?
Dinaga
post Jun 1 2012, 02:49 PM
Post #21


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QUOTE (dark dude @ May 31 2012, 09:23 PM) *
My worry is that being too kind / people possibly taking offense to proper criticism here leads to making members' music or recordings better than they are, and in the long term, they will suffer for it. However, I tend to be quite blunt with these things, so the bias and perhaps lack of patience is there tongue.gif


I agree with you on this one. It's important to give criticism the right way. If you only praise something, the author will think he's better than he /she actually is. But if you get too rough, it can lead to demotivation low self-esteem. For example, if you play a song to someone and he starts with the bad things, you might not even listen to the good sides, because you've already been demotivated.

However, I think the instructors (as well as others) here are very good at giving criticism because they will mention things you played good, but also the things you need to work on. And it will always be encouraging to read, not demotivating. At least that's how it's been for me on GMC smile.gif That's why students here make such good progress - it's a serious institution, as well as a friendly environment to be in as a musician. smile.gif


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Yash
post Jun 1 2012, 02:53 PM
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QUOTE (Dinaga @ Jun 1 2012, 07:19 PM) *
I agree with you on this one. It's important to give criticism the right way. If you only praise something, the author will think he's better than he /she actually is. But if you get too rough, it can lead to demotivation low self-esteem. For example, if you play a song to someone and he starts with the bad things, you might not even listen to the good sides, because you've already been demotivated.

However, I think the instructors (as well as others) here are very good at giving criticism because they will mention things you played good, but also the things you need to work on. And it will always be encouraging to read, not demotivating. At least that's how it's been for me on GMC smile.gif That's why students here make such good progress - it's a serious institution, as well as a friendly environment to be in as a musician. smile.gif


Very true smile.gif


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Jun 1 2012, 02:55 PM
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QUOTE (dark dude @ May 31 2012, 10:23 PM) *
...

My worry is that being too kind / people possibly taking offense to proper criticism here leads to making members' music or recordings better than they are, and in the long term, they will suffer for it. ...


Giving criticism is not an easy thing to do but if people really want to learn and improve it's necessary.

I have to do it all the time as people routinely want/need feedback on their recording/mix. As a mastering engineer I tell the truth but tempered a bit to take account of their abilities, experience and what they're trying to achieve. Generally though I only comment when specifically asked.

I'll usually be much more critical of a professional mix that comes here for mastering for commercial release then of a home recording. I find there's little point in pointing out page after page of mix issues to a beginner as it's just too much to take in and so ultimately not helpful. Nonetheless, the one thing I won't do is tell someone that their mix is of commercial standard when it's not. People often don't like that though particularly as others will be telling them the opposite.

A pro engineer should be able to understand and cope with a detailed critique of the balance of their mix. So in those cases I can go in to much more detail - and here a critique can be lengthy, often broken down in to comments like: insufficient intro and fade in; 0.28 unwanted noise on tail of snare; snare lacks impact on the 2nd chorus; tom rolls need more stereo spread; tonality of the bass tom needs more low end definition; pitch issue with toms generally; 1:28-1:32 backing vox is poorly defined; 1:28-1:38 and 2:28-2:38 backing vox need de-essing; kick drum is recessed behind bass in intro and verse 1 and 2; backing vox need bringing up 3dB throughout; acoustic piano is down 3dB throughout; levels between verse1, chorus 1 and 2 and verse 2 not consistent; timing issue 4:21.5 - end; excessive string/handling noise 3:15-3:32.5; unwanted background noise/talking 3:43-3:47; unwanted amp noise on outro 4:58-end; fade out not smooth. And so on and so on. Nonetheless I still will treat the person as a professional and show them professional courtesy and respect. Personally, I try not to dissrespect other engineers or get in to arguments with them, no matter what I think of them and their work.

One of the more difficult issues is having to explain that a track needs re-recording/mixing from the ground up as it also inevitably begs the question as to whether or not the recording/mix engineer is up to the job. At that point not only am I critiquing the person's work but also potentially suggesting that they're not up to the job. Not an easy thing to do.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jun 1 2012, 03:39 PM
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The truth is that each one of us can get so into their creations, that at some point they won't notice some detail missing or being too accentuated, or on the other hand less accentuated. I never would've evolved without criticism and it was given in many ways, from 'dude you sucked BIG TIME' to 'Hey man, I loved that bend over there, but at the end you missed the two notes which could've made your performance flawless'

It is of utmost importance - if of course, you care about helping someone - to offer criticism in the proper way and when the time is right, if the person is not there to receive it, but you are feeling that the person could evolve after receiving it.



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