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> Stop Looking At Your Fretboard, Another crucial part of practicing
PosterBoy
post Jul 27 2012, 08:10 AM
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For anyone playing live, or on video, this is another area of practice much like playing standing up.

Once you have something under your fingers and up to speed try playing as much as possible looking forward (towards your imaginary audience)

For really technical sections you get a free pass!

I recently got into the bad habit of looking at my fretboard when I didn't need to, and it doesn't look good to those watching.

It makes it hard for you to get an audience/ performer connection

It looks more impressive if you aren't looking at the guitar (it shows artistry)

It's necessary if you sing and play.


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 27 2012, 09:40 AM
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Yep, that's a good observation.. it's great that you notice these things and then pass it on smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 27 2012, 10:58 AM
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I can tell you a bit about that laugh.gif it scares the hell out of me when I play guitar and sing, just because I am thinking that at some point, while getting drunk with music, I will place my fingers in the wrong place on the fretboard and make awful sounds tear away the stream of beauty.

Too poetic? laugh.gif

Well, I always like to close my eyes and imagine the fret board as I would look at it - in 85% of the cases, it really works, but you have to do this while practicing slowly so that your hand memorizes the position it has on the length of the fretboard.

Kinda tricky, but it will work with some practice!

Cosmin


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PosterBoy
post Jul 27 2012, 05:07 PM
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I get really nervous with songs where I'm singing and I've got to 7th to 2nd fret shifts etc, I always try and sneak a quick glance without moving my mouth to far a way from the mic.


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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 28 2012, 07:41 AM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Jul 27 2012, 04:07 PM) *
I get really nervous with songs where I'm singing and I've got to 7th to 2nd fret shifts etc, I always try and sneak a quick glance without moving my mouth to far a way from the mic.


When playing in front of the mic I have two options:

1) Either, I'm sitting - when it's acoustic and it's allowed wink.gif This is the case to hold your guitar side saddle and be able to get a pretty good view of the neck when singing - try it and see how it goes, if you haven't already done that

2) I am standing (most often) - in this case, I am holding the guitar in such a way that the body lies somewhere on my right part of the body, as to the right as possible - then again, I can see the neck if necessary



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Alex Feather
post Jul 28 2012, 10:05 AM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Jul 27 2012, 07:10 AM) *
For anyone playing live, or on video, this is another area of practice much like playing standing up.

Once you have something under your fingers and up to speed try playing as much as possible looking forward (towards your imaginary audience)

For really technical sections you get a free pass!

I recently got into the bad habit of looking at my fretboard when I didn't need to, and it doesn't look good to those watching.

It makes it hard for you to get an audience/ performer connection

It looks more impressive if you aren't looking at the guitar (it shows artistry)

It's necessary if you sing and play.

Good topic!
I have heard about playing in the dark and getting use to the neck without seeing it! It is very important to be able to do so! Try it out when you are jamming just turn off the lights! This is also a great way to develop your ear because when you don't see you are learning to hear!


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Ben Higgins
post Jul 28 2012, 10:25 AM
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Also try practising whilst stood on a sticky carpet that smells of beer whilst not being able to hear your amp.. good practise for live gigs !! laugh.gif


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JesseJ
post Jul 28 2012, 03:03 PM
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Like alex said playing in the dark works great ! I did that when learning chords and it helped alot ! Also though as Cosmin said envision the fretboard in your head. This helped me soooooo much .


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 28 2012, 05:51 PM
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SPECIAL FORCES MERCENARY GIG PREP

Ben's idea is actually GREAT as well. Here is a trick I tried before gigging back in the day.

PREPARE YOURSELF!
1.)Put a set list song in reaper put on headphones, semi loud.
2.)Record your part to a new track(straight in to interface/soundcard no amp)
but put it on mute in reaper so you can't hear yourself.
3.)Close your eyes during recording (sitting at first/standing later).

Here is the fun part
4.)Play back your track now in reaper (put on some guitar vst) and see how you sound

What you are doing here is

USING THE FORCE LUKE



Playing blind and deaf which is all too often what will happen at a gig right during your best guitar part/solo. You can't hear your amp, the stage monitors are full of vocals and drum kit, it's pitch black or there's a strobe light so you can't see the neck.

Essentially, learning to play your part and know what it will sound like even though you can't hear it is a VERY valuable skill and not that hard to develop believe it or not. Like anything else, just takes practice. It's difficult at first but as my fav Samurai Musashi always said "Everything is difficult at first"

In case your wondering, I"m NOT KIDDING about all this. Being able to play basically without seeing your neck or hearing your signal is just part of live music.


Todd



QUOTE (Alex Feather @ Jul 28 2012, 05:05 AM) *
Good topic!
I have heard about playing in the dark and getting use to the neck without seeing it! It is very important to be able to do so! Try it out when you are jamming just turn off the lights! This is also a great way to develop your ear because when you don't see you are learning to hear!


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Jul 28 2012, 06:36 PM


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Alex Feather
post Jul 28 2012, 06:42 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 28 2012, 09:25 AM) *
Also try practising whilst stood on a sticky carpet that smells of beer whilst not being able to hear your amp.. good practise for live gigs !! laugh.gif

LOL!!!


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Todd Simpson
post Jul 28 2012, 06:43 PM
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Then add sticky carpet smile.gif

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jul 28 2012, 12:51 PM) *
SPECIAL FORCES MERCENARY GIG PREP

Ben's idea is actually GREAT as well. Here is a trick I tried before gigging back in the day.

PREPARE YOURSELF!
1.)Put a set list song in reaper put on headphones, semi loud.
2.)Record your part to a new track(straight in to interface/soundcard no amp)
but put it on mute in reaper so you can't hear yourself.
3.)Close your eyes during recording (sitting at first/standing later).

Here is the fun part
4.)Play back your track now in reaper (put on some guitar vst) and see how you sound

What you are doing here is

USING THE FORCE LUKE



Playing blind and deaf which is all too often what will happen at a gig right during your best guitar part/solo. You can't hear your amp, the stage monitors are full of vocals and drum kit, it's pitch black or there's a strobe light so you can't see the neck.

Essentially, learning to play your part and know what it will sound like even though you can't hear it is a VERY valuable skill and not that hard to develop believe it or not. Like anything else, just takes practice. It's difficult at first but as my fav Samurai Musashi always said "Everything is difficult at first"

In case your wondering, I"m NOT KIDDING about all this. Being able to play basically without seeing your neck or hearing your signal is just part of live music.


Todd



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Cosmin Lupu
post Jul 29 2012, 01:38 PM
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And LOUD drummer biggrin.gif plus distorted bass laugh.gif This is the Romanian recipe, never had the sticky carpet though tongue.gif

Todd's idea is very good, but I also experimented with Alex's with all the band biggrin.gif Playing in the rehearsal room with no lights is a great experience - you are only surrounded by various tiny instrument/ amp/ pedal/ PA related lights! You must definitely try it!

QUOTE (JesseJ @ Jul 28 2012, 02:03 PM) *
Like alex said playing in the dark works great ! I did that when learning chords and it helped alot ! Also though as Cosmin said envision the fretboard in your head. This helped me soooooo much .


Thanks mate smile.gif Glad it works!


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derper
post Jul 29 2012, 08:54 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Jul 28 2012, 02:25 AM) *
Also try practising whilst stood on a sticky carpet that smells of beer whilst not being able to hear your amp.. good practise for live gigs !! laugh.gif


Probably the funniest, and most true statement I've read here at GMC.


Maybe we should have a "best of" button, like on craigslist. Where we can nominate the "best of GMC" posts. I would nominate this one.


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