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> Record Labels, What does it take?
thefireball
post Aug 18 2012, 01:02 AM
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Hey guys. I was just thinking about records labels, after I get music released. How would one get signed on? What does it take to get signed on to a label, such as Solid State Records? And also, what does it really mean to be signed on? What is the status? What does it do for you?

Brandon

This post has been edited by thefireball: Aug 18 2012, 01:02 AM


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 18 2012, 01:08 AM
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How to get a Record Deal (A million ways to skin a cat but here's the quick one)

1.)Demonstrate a large following willing to buy tickets/merch/music.

2.)See rule #1.

A Record company is essentially a bank in the broad sense. They used to give you and "advance" against future sales. That's mostly over. Now many bands produce their own record and record companies are more about distribution and promotion.

However, for most Rock/Metal Artists, the days of "Getting Signed" are something that lives in the days of old. These days you can do all of it yourself. PERIPHERY is a fine example. I posted an article on that just recently. Here it is

http://www.hypebot.com/hypebot/2012/08/per...etal-bands.html


But this link is to a post by the singer for XANDRIA about the music biz itself and it's very insightful.

https://www.facebook.com/notes/lisa-middelh...150985243797373


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by Lisa Middelhauve

It is discussed everywhere nowadays: The music business is going through changes. We - musicians, managers, promoters, booking agents and everyone from this business - closed our eyes while it was bleeding, or even worse, we held the knives and cut the wounds. It became harder and harder for musicians and bands to get a record deal, a booking contract, or any help one would not have to pay for... more than what one already had. So everybody doubled the efforts, tried to invent new tricks and keep up with the times.

Where did this lead us?

Rock music, my one true love, has become a whore. Over are the times when you saved your money to buy the albums of your favorite artist; over are the times when you listened to them like you would listen to a friend. The music industry has become a self-service buffet, and we gratefully serve ourselves on fake silver plates. We get cheaper and cheaper in order to make the best offer to an audience that, in large part, isn't willing to pay for our discounted art. And who could take this mentality amiss! Rock music, once the playground of rebellion and the one place in music where every thought was allowed to be spoken out loud, now has laced itself up into the corset of so-called professionalism - and is nothing but pop business in leather pants.

I am disgusted. Disgusted to experience Metal bands using playbacks like they would to prostitute themselves on a Chart Show stage. Disgusted and disappointed by how many musicians refuse to have closer contact with their fans for fear of seeming unprofessional. (The mystery, you know.)

And I am sad and ashamed, because I took part in this.
"Professionalism". I've thought about it a lot these recent days. Professionalism is the scapegoat of the music biz. If you say or do this or that, you're not "professional". Oh well.

I am aware of my unimportance in the music business. Whether I'm here or not will not change anything for the business. And the more I think about it, the less I want to change it. It's dead anyway.

The one thing that can never be taken from us is the essence of our personality. When I am not a singer, not a composer and not a writer, I am still... Lisa. And when I am a singer, a composer and a writer, I cannot be less than that.

So, consciously, willingly, with these words, I quit my professional career... but not my career. Goodbye, music biz - no one will ever be able to accuse me of breaking the rules of this business, because I don't play this game, and I don't accept these rules blindly any more. Hello, Lisa biz. I'm here and I'll stay here.

I may be only one, and my act of bravery might look pathetic, but I can assure you, for me this is a big and serious thing. I have given up every chance of a conventional career with this. I've never been less protected or less masked than now. I have no history and an uncertain future. But right in this moment, I am proud to be nothing more and nothing less than

Lisa





QUOTE (thefireball @ Aug 17 2012, 08:02 PM) *
Hey guys. I was just thinking about records labels. How would one get signed on? What does it take to get signed on to a label, such as Solid State Records? And also, what does it really mean to be signed on? What is the status? What does it do for you?

Brandon


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Aug 18 2012, 01:12 AM


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Aug 18 2012, 09:30 AM
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Some get signed because there is a lot of buzz about them. That increasingly can be via social networking as Todd says. It can also be via traditional routes such as playing gigs, self-releasing records, getting radio air play and newspaper reports/reviews, and building up a following.

Some get signed beacase they are incredibly lucky and a producer/A&R/whatever stumbles across them singing in the supermarket.

Some get signed because they take part in and win/get placed in some 'talent show' competition.

Some get signed because they have good management with good contacts.

Some get signed because they put together a professional resume package of a properly recorded/mixed/mastered demo, band info, where they're gigging and when, etc. The package needs to stand out from the others and gets A&R attention. A&R tend to listen to a demo for less than 40 seconds before deciding whether or not to bin it. It's not properly recorded, mixed and mastered etc it will probably go in the bin.

Some get signed becuase they do a show case gig for A&R.

Some get signed because of recommendations from someone in the industry - an engineer, a producer, whatever.

Getting signed is partly down to talent but its often more down to hard work, perserverence, doing the right things, acting professionally and networking effectively.

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Xandria/Lisa's article is largely right but it's been like that for as long as I remember. It's an industry where there are many who use people, some who are used and some who do neither. People need to learn how the industry works and after a while you get to know who you are happy to work with/for, who you want to avoid and what you are prepared to do to make a living. When you know what you are prepared to do keep it mind that you will build a reputation and others will decide whether they will work with/for you land how they will treat and respond to you partly based on it.

This post has been edited by tonymiro: Aug 18 2012, 09:34 AM


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thefireball
post Aug 23 2012, 04:12 PM
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Thanks T 'n T! biggrin.gif tongue.gif I found that first article about Periphery very cool. It gave me some encouragement and ideas for my own production. That first link of Periphery was broken, Todd, but I found it. wink.gif Here it is for passers-by.

PERIPHERY SETS MODEL FOR MODERN METAL BANDS



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The Uncreator
post Aug 24 2012, 12:48 AM
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The only unfortunate thing with Periphery is that they literally LEAD an entire army under the so called "djent" banner. I mean, Engl heads and Orange cabs got extra business because Misha used them to "djent" laugh.gif

They were on the tip of a wave that is already dying out unfortunately, they had the common sense though to do something other bands dont do and just make the music THEY want, So many bedroom musicians just djent for the sake of djent, and its lacking any personality. Periphery, even if you ask Misha, is INSANE amounts of work and luck. Its hours of work, its a job, 8 plus hours a day, always working weekends, few days off, but its something you love. Its the DIY, Maiden attitude.

In this day and age, deals can be made where the music remains entirely yours, but you see less money (according to some interviews with Mr. Mansoor), and its easier to get noticed, but still incredibly hard.

Just make music for the sake of making yourself happy. Dont write a certain song to try and be more noticed, just do what makes you happy, and promote the hell out of yourself.

Just remember, you cant be worse off than I am, 15 minute death metal songs with lots of synths and complex interweaving narrative arcs that require a lot of attention, not many people look my way laugh.gif
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Ben Higgins
post Aug 24 2012, 08:28 AM
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What does it take ??

Man, balls of steel and a determination to match. The real secret is just never, never give up. Keep knocking on doors until you find the right ones. You may try one type of tactic, then find it hasn't really yielded anything and then you may try another. There's no one 'right' way to get there, only your way.

I liken choosing a career like this to embarking on a journey where there is no road map at all. Sure, we've got the stories of others who have made it etc but every persons journey is completely bespoke and there's no road map for stuff like this so we've got to carve out the path as we go along. The great thing is you can change your mind about things at any time and try a different approach, it's all part of the process smile.gif


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thefireball
post Aug 24 2012, 02:55 PM
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QUOTE (The Uncreator @ Aug 23 2012, 06:48 PM) *
Just remember, you cant be worse off than I am, 15 minute death metal songs with lots of synths and complex interweaving narrative arcs that require a lot of attention, not many people look my way laugh.gif


Aw come on, man! Your stuff is genius, it just takes time. Maybe millions of people know about you, but it's so awesome they DIE! laugh.gif

My personal favorite is from a YouTube video that I think you had up one time that I think is not there anymore. I can't remember what it was. I remember the color green in the video. biggrin.gif I don't know if you had yourself in the video, or if it was just pictures...


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The Uncreator
post Aug 24 2012, 09:42 PM
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I'm just saying, what you like to write is more accessible to more people, so just let that encourage you more.

I'm so screwed though laugh.gif
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PosterBoy
post Aug 25 2012, 07:25 AM
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A lot of the smaller record labels need you to provide them with the finished product and just help support you as an artist and your record. distributing and some promotion, putting tracks out on label compilations, connecting with radio stations etc

Once I get recording I'll put out at least my first offering for free for a few reason

Marketing strategy
Building a fan base email list
Get feedback from downloaders
Help find collaborators for, band members, video creators

One of the two projects will always be a free with donation option due to the nature of the music and it's intention (it's good to give back)

I like the approach of Comeandlive.com, as a Christian artist it might peak your interest


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thefireball
post Aug 25 2012, 05:04 PM
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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Aug 25 2012, 01:25 AM) *
I like the approach of Comeandlive.com, as a Christian artist it might peak your interest


That is cool. smile.gif


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