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> Time To Mix? How Long?
Todd Simpson
post Sep 29 2012, 04:04 AM
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As this pic shows, sometimes, it seems like mixing takes forever. How long does it take you to mix a song in general?


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Lovtscho
post Sep 29 2012, 10:19 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 29 2012, 03:04 AM) *
How long does it take you to mix a song in general?


Actually I mixed in the past 10 years several tracks and albums for friends and some professional.

To me it totally depends on the kind of music you mix. If I mix Several tracks I usually skip to the next track after 1-2 hours and switch back later. Once the track soundsmsomehow good I let it sleep on the harddisk for at least one day. Then I go back, listen carefully to my mix, compare it to the other tracks to make sure they fit to each other and then, if everythin sits I create a two track with some anaolg buscompression (slightly) with a FATSO or my Alan Smart C2.

So in the end I need 2-4 hours per track, if it is rock or pop. If you have recorded livedrums you need more time to fix noise and stuff like that

This post has been edited by Lovtscho: Sep 29 2012, 10:21 AM


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Saoirse O'Shea
post Sep 29 2012, 10:31 AM
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On those rare occassions when we do mix it really depends on the arrangement, how many tracks, how much comping is required and so on. Generally though I usually allow anywhere about a week for the approval mix of the first song (the other songs go quicker) if it's unattended. Doesn't always take a week but I prefer to have more time then not enough.
Attended - partly depends on the artist and producer and how much time they're willing to allow but not less than 1 day. Just like Lovtscho I also prefer to let a mix rest for a day or two and relisten to it to check prior to approval.


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The Uncreator
post Sep 29 2012, 01:58 PM
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Well, the most I'll spend mixing is about 5-6 hours. After that, I like to relax my ears for 1-2 hours keeping the noise level down, then come back to it. Once I'm done, I usually wont listen to it for a day, and then 24 hours later, maybe spend another hour or two making small adjustments.
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Sep 30 2012, 06:19 PM
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Depending on the quantity of channels, but a mix takes me around 4 and 5 hours. And then maybe 1 hour more, another day for adjustments... However my first mixes used to last as much as the guys in the photo! tongue.gif


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Alex Feather
post Oct 1 2012, 02:17 AM
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lol! it usually takes me a few weeks to get it right! I keep going back and forth until I am happy with the sound!


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El Fortinero
post Oct 2 2012, 12:33 AM
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great thread!

I was given a nice advice some years ago, a friend that works recording bands told me to download the tracks to a cd and listen it in different cd players


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 2 2012, 02:29 AM
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QUOTE (El Fortinero @ Oct 1 2012, 07:33 PM) *
great thread!

I was given a nice advice some years ago, a friend that works recording bands told me to download the tracks to a cd and listen it in different cd players


Always a good idea smile.gif Putting your mix on different audio systems, including bad ones, will give you a general idea of how your mix might "Travel". Also, try ear buds, (DON"T MIX WITH THEM!) just for reference as many folks will listen to your mix on crappy little ear buds so it needs to sound good on those too.

Try it out in various car audio systems, home systems, etc. See how it does in a variety of conditions.

Todd


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Max Sokolov
post Oct 2 2012, 04:27 AM
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QUOTE (Lovtscho @ Sep 29 2012, 09:19 AM) *
To me it totally depends on the kind of music you mix. If I mix Several tracks I usually skip to the next track after 1-2 hours and switch back later. Once the track soundsmsomehow good I let it sleep on the harddisk for at least one day. Then I go back, listen carefully to my mix, compare it to the other tracks to make sure they fit to each other and then, if everythin sits I create a two track with some anaolg buscompression (slightly) with a FATSO or my Alan Smart C2.

Great post, I totally agree with that!


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Marcus Siepen
post Oct 5 2012, 08:21 AM
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Mixing time depends a lot on the song of course. I would say the average time for our songs is around a day, but on the very epic songs it can take longer, I am not sure but I think mixing "And then there was silence" took a week ^^


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Oct 5 2012, 03:19 PM
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QUOTE (Marcus Siepen @ Oct 5 2012, 04:21 AM) *
Mixing time depends a lot on the song of course. I would say the average time for our songs is around a day, but on the very epic songs it can take longer, I am not sure but I think mixing "And then there was silence" took a week ^^



Great input! It's true! It's not the same mixing a Ramones song than a Blind Guardian song... I was talking about 4 piece rock bands when I said that it tooks me 4 hours.. I would be at least 8 or maybe much more to mix a track like "Nightfall"!


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 6 2012, 07:11 AM
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QUOTE (Marcus Siepen @ Oct 5 2012, 03:21 AM) *
Mixing time depends a lot on the song of course. I would say the average time for our songs is around a day, but on the very epic songs it can take longer, I am not sure but I think mixing "And then there was silence" took a week ^^


Good point! Adding EPICNESS Takes time! Here is a clip of Marcus's Band ( Blind Guardian) working in the studio prior to their 2 Year Tour! It's a spiff window in to the "Process" in general. Enjoy!

Marcus: What was your experience like during these sessions? The sound engineer seems like a very cool guy. Some engineers can be high strung which always makes things a bit rough.





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The Uncreator
post Oct 6 2012, 02:39 PM
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Firstly, I love the joke about no one liking frederiks ideas except himself laugh.gif

Also, to echo Marcus' comments - "And Then There Was Silence" is 14 minutes and took a week, I just finished one my other longer songs which is about 15 minutes, and it took me about a week. I think when you get into songs like ATTWS, the mixing becomes less predictable as the guitars, drums, vocals, keys, everything is doing WAY more variation, so each specific part needs its own attention. With a shorter song for me, anything under maybe 7-8 minutes, I know how I can treat the verses each time they come up, or at least get and idea of what needs to be done, add more material and its starting from scratch with each section.
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VilleFIN
post Oct 7 2012, 11:24 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 6 2012, 09:11 AM) *

Why I always think that recording guitar tracks in studio is like sitting alone in a small room, headphones on and you're not allow to breathe, fart or wipe the sweat until your take is done biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by WeePee: Oct 7 2012, 11:25 AM


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 8 2012, 09:04 PM
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QUOTE (WeePee @ Oct 7 2012, 06:24 AM) *
Why I always think that recording guitar tracks in studio is like sitting alone in a small room, headphones on and you're not allow to breathe, fart or wipe the sweat until your take is done biggrin.gif


Your thinking probably about the guitar player being in the same room as the amps. In that case (which is pretty rare these days) the guitar player is in there with the microphones so he has to be careful near and after a take. Thankfully, guitar players can be in the control room and the amps can be in the "Loud Room" (non technical term) or "Live Room/Main Room" (technical term) where the amps are loud enough to melt paint.

So recording using SIMS/EMULATORS works along the lines of the guitar player being in the control room. Since there is no Amp sitting next to you, it's as if you have a nice live room with a loud expensive amp somewhere miced up and ready to go. This is quite handy if you are the musician and the audio engineer. If the amp is in the same room, it's harder to tell what is coming from the amp vs speakers/headphones to there's some guessing/practice involved.

Todd


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