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> Great Phrasing And Note Choice
PosterBoy
post Dec 9 2012, 09:28 AM
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Sometimes it isn't speed and technique that makes you sit up and pay attention.

Post your favourites

Also what do you think are the best ways to get better at phrasing and note choice?

Is it just copying our favourite players and taking the time to nail the subtle nuances?

Working on our triads and chord tones, listening to different notes over chords to hear how they sound and if they give a sense of resolution or finding the different options for resolution?

Practicing scales in different intervals, using pedal tones, using rhythmic ideas, odd numbered groupings etc?

Ear Training.

Probably all of the above and more!

This post has been edited by PosterBoy: Dec 9 2012, 09:32 AM


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HungryForHeaven
post Dec 9 2012, 10:46 AM
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For making note choices, I'd say it's a combination of ear training and listening to lots and lots of music.

Phrasing, as in vibrato, bends, trills and mini trills, slides, or in general sneaking in stuff that wouldn't be written in the sheet music score; I believe one can practice some isolated areas, but only to some extent. The rest is just playing and playing and, again, listening.

I know many of you are fed up with Malmsteen, for various reasons. But he was my first big influence and I have always been a fan of him. To be honest, however, most of his "demos" or "instruction videos" are useless from an educational point of view. But I recently saw this one, and I got very impressed by everything, his phrasing alone being a big part of why I like his playing (although the speed helps too, of course). The sound is a bit weird, since the video is shot in the studio and the direct sound from the guitar hasn't been filtered out.



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Ben Higgins
post Dec 9 2012, 11:14 AM
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The first thing that really made me take note of melody construction / phrasing (I didn't know it was called phrasing back then) was Satriani with Surfing with the Alien. I'd never heard anybody make a guitar sound so 'cool' before smile.gif


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TeoWulf
post Dec 9 2012, 11:30 AM
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For me Ritchie Blackmore is the man, when it comes to phrasing and note choice
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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 9 2012, 03:18 PM
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I've always enjoyed Steve Lukather both as a player and vocalist! Awesome musicianship, tone feel and phrasing - definitely my kind!


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 11 2012, 04:24 PM
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I"m a big fan of Yngwie myself actually smile.gif I remember hearing "Rising Force" for the first time and thinking I might have to set my guitar on fire and throw it off a cliff. He does get a bad rap for being a little, well, a LOT of an egomaniac. It seems that has abated somewhat now he has some years on him.

His use of phrasing has always impressed me. Though many accuse him of using "TOO MANY NOTES" which is what they said about Mozart during his day as well since his works works were "Busy" (not that I"m saying Yngwie is Mozart!!) just that both get the same grief over the same issue. He does make great use of bends, legato, etc. which is often overlooked.


Todd

QUOTE (HungryForHeaven @ Dec 9 2012, 04:46 AM) *
For making note choices, I'd say it's a combination of ear training and listening to lots and lots of music.

Phrasing, as in vibrato, bends, trills and mini trills, slides, or in general sneaking in stuff that wouldn't be written in the sheet music score; I believe one can practice some isolated areas, but only to some extent. The rest is just playing and playing and, again, listening.

I know many of you are fed up with Malmsteen, for various reasons. But he was my first big influence and I have always been a fan of him. To be honest, however, most of his "demos" or "instruction videos" are useless from an educational point of view. But I recently saw this one, and I got very impressed by everything, his phrasing alone being a big part of why I like his playing (although the speed helps too, of course). The sound is a bit weird, since the video is shot in the studio and the direct sound from the guitar hasn't been filtered out.




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coffeeman
post Dec 11 2012, 05:33 PM
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Without a doubt my favourite is David Gilmour, every note es perfect.



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bleez
post Dec 12 2012, 12:52 AM
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QUOTE (coffeeman @ Dec 11 2012, 04:33 PM) *
Without a doubt my favourite is David Gilmour, every note es perfect.

indeed. Dave Gilmour is the first guitarist I think of when I hear the word 'phrasing'.


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casinostrat
post Dec 12 2012, 01:35 AM
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QUOTE (bleez @ Dec 11 2012, 11:52 PM) *
indeed. Dave Gilmour is the first guitarist I think of when I hear the word 'phrasing'.


He is for me as well. smile.gif


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 12 2012, 09:28 AM
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QUOTE (casinostrat @ Dec 12 2012, 12:35 AM) *
He is for me as well. smile.gif


I subscribe to that as well!


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