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DarkWaveRiffer
post Dec 12 2012, 06:01 PM
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This question is directed to Cosmin, but can be answered by anyone. I am working on Stacotto Power Chords, and It's pretty easy, but I am having issue playing with the backing track. I don't know how to sync it up. Its not something I have learned in my year of local instruction. So this leads me to my next question. I notice almost all exercises here have backing tracks. How do I practice with them? I have a GDEC 15 AMP, Guitar Pro 6, and a crappy laptop. I have a HD camcorder for recording.
I was hoping through analysis, I could develop a sound way to practice so I can make steady progress. It's amazing how some excel faster than others, you can attribute it to many things, time, skill, teacher,environment, but if we presume all things equal between two people,but give them different lessons, one will invariably standout, to a lesser, or greater degree. What I believe is it's the bridge lessons that make you better faster. A bridge lesson is a lesson just a little bit outside of your ability, but not so much where you either give up after a time of frustration, or you persevere, you finally get it, but in the mean time you could have learned 2-3 other bridge lessons, and been that much better.

My dilemma is finding those bridge lessons, and incorporating the right way to practice to gain the full benefit of that bridge lesson. The bridge lesson builds confidence in the young (young in playing time) guitarists playing to keep going, and not give up in frustration.I think eventually you reach a point in confidence that gives you momentum to keep going. Some people reach a level of skill where they are a decent guitarist, and don't push themselves much afterwards, and stop bridging. I feel like Mozart in my head, but a 1 year old trying to play stairway to heaven on guitar. One thing I think instructors do very well here is find those bridge lessons, go ahead and coin the phrase if you want. wink.gif

So people don't misunderstand me, I am simply trying to make the most of my lessons, and give people some food for thought. I feel like my confidence in guitar is wavering, and unless I do something to solidify, and build on it, I won't reach that momentum phase. So I realize its all in how I practice.

I look forward to your thoughts.


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jstcrsn
post Dec 12 2012, 06:10 PM
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QUOTE (DarkWaveRiffer @ Dec 12 2012, 06:01 PM) *
This question is directed to Cosmin, but can be answered by anyone. I am working on Stacotto Power Chords, and It's pretty easy, but I am having issue playing with the backing track. I don't know how to sync it up. Its not something I have learned in my year of local instruction. So this leads me to my next question. I notice almost all exercises here have backing tracks. How do I practice with them? I have a GDEC 15 AMP, Guitar Pro 6, and a crappy laptop. I have a HD camcorder for recording.
I was hoping through analysis, I could develop a sound way to practice so I can make steady progress. It's amazing how some excel faster than others, you can attribute it to many things, time, skill, teacher,environment, but if we presume all things equal between two people,but give them different lessons, one will invariably standout, to a lesser, or greater degree. What I believe is it's the bridge lessons that make you better faster. A bridge lesson is a lesson just a little bit outside of your ability, but not so much where you either give up after a time of frustration, or you persevere, you finally get it, but in the mean time you could have learned 2-3 other bridge lessons, and been that much better.

My dilemma is finding those bridge lessons, and incorporating the right way to practice to gain the full benefit of that bridge lesson. The bridge lesson builds confidence in the young (young in playing time) guitarists playing to keep going, and not give up in frustration.I think eventually you reach a point in confidence that gives you momentum to keep going. Some people reach a level of skill where they are a decent guitarist, and don't push themselves much afterwards, and stop bridging. I feel like Mozart in my head, but a 1 year old trying to play stairway to heaven on guitar. One thing I think instructors do very well here is find those bridge lessons, go ahead and coin the phrase if you want. wink.gif

So people don't misunderstand me, I am simply trying to make the most of my lessons, and give people some food for thought. I feel like my confidence in guitar is wavering, and unless I do something to solidify, and build on it, I won't reach that momentum phase. So I realize its all in how I practice.

I look forward to your thoughts.

I have been downloading into tux guitar or gtr pro if you have that, reducing the tempo and turining on the metronome,
I have been strugling with this as well, trying to play something beyond my ability but now I have to somehow slow it down so I can play it cleanly , when slowing it down changes the groove that I have not even been able to establish in my own mind.
So , in my theory slowing it down with tux guitar yet turning on the metronome to establish the groove.

P.S. to any instructor, if you could record your lessons with the slowest backing track , I think it would do wonders for helping us to establish a better starting point

This post has been edited by jstcrsn: Dec 12 2012, 06:22 PM
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azureus
post Dec 12 2012, 07:16 PM
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QUOTE (jstcrsn @ Dec 12 2012, 05:10 PM) *
I have been downloading into tux guitar or gtr pro if you have that, reducing the tempo and turining on the metronome,
I have been strugling with this as well, trying to play something beyond my ability but now I have to somehow slow it down so I can play it cleanly , when slowing it down changes the groove that I have not even been able to establish in my own mind.
So , in my theory slowing it down with tux guitar yet turning on the metronome to establish the groove.

P.S. to any instructor, if you could record your lessons with the slowest backing track , I think it would do wonders for helping us to establish a better starting point


I can't say it better than you guy's
And i am thinking al so this way ,i need exactly to now what to practise,to not wasting time and raech me goul!
For slowing down backing tracks ,i am using SONG SURGEON 3!!..you can go as slow you want ,without lowering the pitch !!
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DarkWaveRiffer
post Dec 12 2012, 07:27 PM
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So, when you have Song Surgeon on, or Guitar Pro on your computer, you are playing along with it on your amp?
Are you playing along with the backing track, or the exercise tracks? I would think you would want to play with the exercise tracks first to get it down, and then do the backing tracks.


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azureus
post Dec 12 2012, 08:17 PM
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QUOTE (DarkWaveRiffer @ Dec 12 2012, 06:27 PM) *
So, when you have Song Surgeon on, or Guitar Pro on your computer, you are playing along with it on your amp?
Are you playing along with the backing track, or the exercise tracks? I would think you would want to play with the exercise tracks first to get it down, and then do the backing tracks.


Hay wink.gif
I have no amp ,but i play with a line 6 ux1 trouh me laptop !
mostly i am making me own exercise tracks! yes ,when i have it down on those tracks ,then i go to backing tracks !
So ,it go like i want and i can do it !
But i have also maybe a strange vieuw on practise !..
After al me lost time ,i have thinking a lot over it,and came to somme conclusions that working fine for me!
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DarkWaveRiffer
post Dec 12 2012, 08:53 PM
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QUOTE (azureus @ Dec 12 2012, 02:17 PM) *
Hay wink.gif
I have no amp ,but i play with a line 6 ux1 trouh me laptop !
mostly i am making me own exercise tracks! yes ,when i have it down on those tracks ,then i go to backing tracks !
So ,it go like i want and i can do it !
But i have also maybe a strange vieuw on practise !..
After al me lost time ,i have thinking a lot over it,and came to somme conclusions that working fine for me!



OK, So what I get from this is:
1. Follow the exercise track at a speed that you can play cleanly. Get this down to where you can play smooth.
This step, depending on parts could take awhile. I know I have to practice part of an exercise or song, over and over until I get it.
2. Once you have the familiarity down, then play with the backing track at a pace you can play cleanly, and smooth.
3. Increase tempo incrementally once you can play it smooth, and cleanly at that tempo until you reach desired tempo.


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Patrik Berg
post Dec 12 2012, 09:42 PM
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If you have rhythm and timing difficulties, try to play a beat to any song with your hands slapping your knees, it will help you to physically feel the tempo beat and groove. I think it's a great way to develop a sense of timing and feel.


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azureus
post Dec 12 2012, 09:46 PM
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QUOTE (DarkWaveRiffer @ Dec 12 2012, 07:53 PM) *
OK, So what I get from this is:
1. Follow the exercise track at a speed that you can play cleanly. Get this down to where you can play smooth.
This step, depending on parts could take awhile. I know I have to practice part of an exercise or song, over and over until I get it.
2. Once you have the familiarity down, then play with the backing track at a pace you can play cleanly, and smooth.
3. Increase tempo incrementally once you can play it smooth, and cleanly at that tempo until you reach desired tempo.


Yes ,that's the way!...IF ,you have the VERRY basic movements down !...otherwise it's gone be verry diffeculd! smile.gif
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Qenzoz
post Dec 13 2012, 04:41 AM
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Practicing one of my favorite and most annoying subjects, the subject that I've spent too much time on figuring out and not doing enough of it & also a subject that's really hard to figure out, like a good riddle since it's hard to say what the right way to practice is..

A good amount of text is incoming to the wilderness, so get a a couple of beers and 3 boxes of donuts wink.gif.

First of all, it is important to figure out how you are as a person, how dumb this may sound, it is actually true (IMO), since if you know how you like to do things it'll make practicing a lot easier, do you like it structured, or maybe you don't even like it to be structured but you need it to be & that way you could maybe force your self to liking it.
What I've done for my self is trying to create a ton of different practice routines & none of them worked, because I don't like it structured it gets too boring and it's just the same. And I've watched a ton of interviews with all those insane guitarists out there, listened to what they all say & to what the instructors & students here at GMC says.

So what I've come to figure out is that practice isn't suppose to be a chore, it is also something you can gradually build up. Think about it like when people work out, some people likes to just say from day 1 to day 2 now I have to work out 2 times a day 5 times a week I have to eat that, that and that. And make it really hard for them self, because they've seen some Olympic dude do it or someone of their friends could do that from the start. The point is that almost anyone that does it eventually starts stopping, so it is much more important to take it easy and have fun and that will eventually (when you're having fun) make you play even more.

And another thing it is important not to compare your self to another person, since they can maybe practice 6 hours a day and you can only get 2 done. And also a guy on YouTube can say hes been playing for 2 years and can play Scarified by Paul Gilbert, sure that could happen. But maybe that's the only thing he can do? Since that's maybe hes only video..

Now is it possible to actually make practicing fun?

I highly believe it is. Just get an instructor to advice you with lessons and it will already seem somewhat more fun (IMO) since a guy that might be at the level you want to be & maybe has more experience than you, which won't make you so stressed and worried about if you're actually practicing a lesson that is good for you.

What I've learned so far with my own experience is that, it is really important to get an lesson 100% down maybe go for a 9.5/10 score REC wise, it is so easy to learn a lesson get the notes down and play it and it might seem right, but if you make sure you get each lesson from now on 100% down, and all details, make sure there isn't any feedback and such where you don't want it to be & you can play it like the instructor does in the lesson preview. Of course if you're new to playing the guitar this may be a little too much, but if you're starting to be able to get those intermediate lessons down, it might be a good thing to keep on working till you have it down, since in the end it will be a major reward, and suddenly in the future each thing you'll learn will be `perfect´.

So now to answer your actual question 'How Do I Practice?'

I more or less use a combination of Reaper & Guitar Pro, instead of Guitar Pro you could use TuxGuitar (FREE) & Reaper is also free, if I remember correctly I think it is like the freeware version of Avast where now and then you'll get some popup and it'll just ask about something, not sure what.

Reaper
Here I use a VST plug-in to get my guitar sound, since my amp makes too much noise, that could be - Guitar Rig, AmpliTube, Pod Farm & all those kind of fun things.
Then I make it so that the guitar sound only will come out of the right speaker, you could choose left, I just prefer right, maybe because I am right handed.

Guitar Pro
Here I load the tabs from the lesson, then no matter what lesson it is I set the BPM to 100, more on that in a second.
I set it so that the guitar sound only comes out of the left speaker (opposite of Reaper).
Now under the 'Sound' button I'll enable Metronome & Countdown.
Under 'Sound' again I'll choose the thing that's right above Metronome, not sure what it is called in English, but you can also press F9.

Now you'll see some numbers. What I do is I'll enable 'Speed trainer' & Repeat the countdown.
So lets say that you're practicing a lessons with the original tempo of 164 BPM, this is where the setting it to 100 BPM comes in hand (IMO).
Now since you've set it to 100 BPM, the math gets really easy when using the Speed Trainer since now 1% is just 1 BPM, instead of it being 1.64 BPM.

So you could set it up something like this: From 50% to 100% step 2% repeat 2x

This will make it start at 50 BPM go up till 100 BPM and just keep staying there till you stop it, it'll go up by 2% each time (2 BPM) and it'll play the part you've selected or the whole thing if you haven't selected any specific part in the tab twice before going up 2%.

So now you can take a short break since after this is done there could be gone like 15 minutes, for me this makes practice seem WAY easier and WAY faster, since sometimes before I could set on a stopwatch and say I have to sit and practice this for 5 minutes, but this way I don't make my brain just wait for that ringing noise, I just sit and play and suddenly I am playing faster, without actually realizing it.

What you can do after taking a short break just to refresh your mind and being ready to focus again (since it is important to take like 2-3 minutes break here and there - the human brain can only focus for around 15-30 minutes at a time), so now you could go to another lesson or take the next BPM's

This can be used to practice licks taking it from 50 BPM repeat it 50 times and then only go up by 1 BPM or so, and this is of course just an idea, no right or wrong, if it works best for you to jump off a roof with your guitar and suddenly you can all Steve Vai songs, then that's awesome! biggrin.gif

Except there is one thing, you may never forget and that is to stomp your foot! This is really important I am talking for my own experience. I always thought I could just play without stomping my foot & sure that is true, but when I started to record I realized how bad my timing was, since I had no inner metronome, where as just playing to a metronome won't really build it that well, but if you start getting your foot stomping a long to the metronome, it'll make you a rhythmic genius! At first it might seem like playing guitar from new again, but after some days or weeks it'll just come naturally each time you'll play a lesson & suddenly you can play things without a metronome and it'll still feel in time & the rest of the band will probably like it a lot smile.gif

A lot of this is just my view on practicing since there isn't any right or wrong, except a few human things and that would be make sure you get enough food and probably healthy ones, but if you eat chips etc, that's okay just make sure you're not starving that can make you get headaches and really make you unfocused, of course healthy food is the best, but just make sure you're not starving, get enough fluids, water is preferred, still people like sodas and beer now a days, so go ahead, just not too many beers since that'll probably make you go like 'WOA I AM ROCKING THIS THING' when you might be missing 4 strings. Also get enough sleep that's really really really really really important, since that's where the brain really gets all those patterns down you've just been practicing for 6 hours & don't sit an just practice 8 hours in a row, take breaks here and there, try and do what feels best, I like to use a general rule if I make the same mistake like 2-3 times I take a break, since then you can get back and you might be able to play it perfectly also else you might get bad habits, make sure to play things perfect, usually that also means really slow at first. Since if you make too many mistakes and could also be mistakes you don't realize at first, could just be something like a small mute you forget because you're just playing a tiny bit too fast and suddenly that can become a very very bad habit for your brain since it'll think that's what you want to do...

So a lot of text, now that means you've had some time to drink a couple of beers eat 3 boxes of donuts and ready to practice the guitar and hopefully some of it is somewhat useful to you smile.gif

Cheers & keep on practicing! smile.gif

Tobias


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DarkWaveRiffer
post Dec 13 2012, 05:50 AM
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QUOTE (Qenzoz @ Dec 12 2012, 10:41 PM) *
Practicing one of my favorite and most annoying subjects, the subject that I've spent too much time on figuring out and not doing enough of it & also a subject that's really hard to figure out, like a good riddle since it's hard to say what the right way to practice is..

A good amount of text is incoming to the wilderness, so get a a couple of beers and 3 boxes of donuts wink.gif.

First of all, it is important to figure out how you are as a person, how dumb this may sound, it is actually true (IMO), since if you know how you like to do things it'll make practicing a lot easier, do you like it structured, or maybe you don't even like it to be structured but you need it to be & that way you could maybe force your self to liking it.
What I've done for my self is trying to create a ton of different practice routines & none of them worked, because I don't like it structured it gets too boring and it's just the same. And I've watched a ton of interviews with all those insane guitarists out there, listened to what they all say & to what the instructors & students here at GMC says.

So what I've come to figure out is that practice isn't suppose to be a chore, it is also something you can gradually build up. Think about it like when people work out, some people likes to just say from day 1 to day 2 now I have to work out 2 times a day 5 times a week I have to eat that, that and that. And make it really hard for them self, because they've seen some Olympic dude do it or someone of their friends could do that from the start. The point is that almost anyone that does it eventually starts stopping, so it is much more important to take it easy and have fun and that will eventually (when you're having fun) make you play even more.

And another thing it is important not to compare your self to another person, since they can maybe practice 6 hours a day and you can only get 2 done. And also a guy on YouTube can say hes been playing for 2 years and can play Scarified by Paul Gilbert, sure that could happen. But maybe that's the only thing he can do? Since that's maybe hes only video..

Now is it possible to actually make practicing fun?

I highly believe it is. Just get an instructor to advice you with lessons and it will already seem somewhat more fun (IMO) since a guy that might be at the level you want to be & maybe has more experience than you, which won't make you so stressed and worried about if you're actually practicing a lesson that is good for you.

What I've learned so far with my own experience is that, it is really important to get an lesson 100% down maybe go for a 9.5/10 score REC wise, it is so easy to learn a lesson get the notes down and play it and it might seem right, but if you make sure you get each lesson from now on 100% down, and all details, make sure there isn't any feedback and such where you don't want it to be & you can play it like the instructor does in the lesson preview. Of course if you're new to playing the guitar this may be a little too much, but if you're starting to be able to get those intermediate lessons down, it might be a good thing to keep on working till you have it down, since in the end it will be a major reward, and suddenly in the future each thing you'll learn will be `perfect´.

So now to answer your actual question 'How Do I Practice?'

I more or less use a combination of Reaper & Guitar Pro, instead of Guitar Pro you could use TuxGuitar (FREE) & Reaper is also free, if I remember correctly I think it is like the freeware version of Avast where now and then you'll get some popup and it'll just ask about something, not sure what.

Reaper
Here I use a VST plug-in to get my guitar sound, since my amp makes too much noise, that could be - Guitar Rig, AmpliTube, Pod Farm & all those kind of fun things.
Then I make it so that the guitar sound only will come out of the right speaker, you could choose left, I just prefer right, maybe because I am right handed.

Guitar Pro
Here I load the tabs from the lesson, then no matter what lesson it is I set the BPM to 100, more on that in a second.
I set it so that the guitar sound only comes out of the left speaker (opposite of Reaper).
Now under the 'Sound' button I'll enable Metronome & Countdown.
Under 'Sound' again I'll choose the thing that's right above Metronome, not sure what it is called in English, but you can also press F9.

Now you'll see some numbers. What I do is I'll enable 'Speed trainer' & Repeat the countdown.
So lets say that you're practicing a lessons with the original tempo of 164 BPM, this is where the setting it to 100 BPM comes in hand (IMO).
Now since you've set it to 100 BPM, the math gets really easy when using the Speed Trainer since now 1% is just 1 BPM, instead of it being 1.64 BPM.

So you could set it up something like this: From 50% to 100% step 2% repeat 2x

This will make it start at 50 BPM go up till 100 BPM and just keep staying there till you stop it, it'll go up by 2% each time (2 BPM) and it'll play the part you've selected or the whole thing if you haven't selected any specific part in the tab twice before going up 2%.

So now you can take a short break since after this is done there could be gone like 15 minutes, for me this makes practice seem WAY easier and WAY faster, since sometimes before I could set on a stopwatch and say I have to sit and practice this for 5 minutes, but this way I don't make my brain just wait for that ringing noise, I just sit and play and suddenly I am playing faster, without actually realizing it.

What you can do after taking a short break just to refresh your mind and being ready to focus again (since it is important to take like 2-3 minutes break here and there - the human brain can only focus for around 15-30 minutes at a time), so now you could go to another lesson or take the next BPM's

This can be used to practice licks taking it from 50 BPM repeat it 50 times and then only go up by 1 BPM or so, and this is of course just an idea, no right or wrong, if it works best for you to jump off a roof with your guitar and suddenly you can all Steve Vai songs, then that's awesome! biggrin.gif

Except there is one thing, you may never forget and that is to stomp your foot! This is really important I am talking for my own experience. I always thought I could just play without stomping my foot & sure that is true, but when I started to record I realized how bad my timing was, since I had no inner metronome, where as just playing to a metronome won't really build it that well, but if you start getting your foot stomping a long to the metronome, it'll make you a rhythmic genius! At first it might seem like playing guitar from new again, but after some days or weeks it'll just come naturally each time you'll play a lesson & suddenly you can play things without a metronome and it'll still feel in time & the rest of the band will probably like it a lot smile.gif

A lot of this is just my view on practicing since there isn't any right or wrong, except a few human things and that would be make sure you get enough food and probably healthy ones, but if you eat chips etc, that's okay just make sure you're not starving that can make you get headaches and really make you unfocused, of course healthy food is the best, but just make sure you're not starving, get enough fluids, water is preferred, still people like sodas and beer now a days, so go ahead, just not too many beers since that'll probably make you go like 'WOA I AM ROCKING THIS THING' when you might be missing 4 strings. Also get enough sleep that's really really really really really important, since that's where the brain really gets all those patterns down you've just been practicing for 6 hours & don't sit an just practice 8 hours in a row, take breaks here and there, try and do what feels best, I like to use a general rule if I make the same mistake like 2-3 times I take a break, since then you can get back and you might be able to play it perfectly also else you might get bad habits, make sure to play things perfect, usually that also means really slow at first. Since if you make too many mistakes and could also be mistakes you don't realize at first, could just be something like a small mute you forget because you're just playing a tiny bit too fast and suddenly that can become a very very bad habit for your brain since it'll think that's what you want to do...

So a lot of text, now that means you've had some time to drink a couple of beers eat 3 boxes of donuts and ready to practice the guitar and hopefully some of it is somewhat useful to you smile.gif

Cheers & keep on practicing! smile.gif

Tobias


Lots of great info Tobias thanks! It's not so much I don't know what to practice, it's more like how to practice. Especially these lessons on GMC where you have to record yourself, and many use backing tracks to play with. One thing I really dislike doing, is tapping my foot, but what you say makes a lot of sense. So I will start doing this. I need a better computer before I start running my guitar through it. Ideally this is what I would like to do for recording, and utilizing the practice tools like Song Surgeon, and Guitar Pro.

Patrick Berg mentioned slapping your knees to get the feel of the rhythm. Steve Stine a guitarist who has some really good instructional DVDs mentions the same thing. One is a kid's DVD called Kid's Rock Guitar. has a technique called Scratching, where you mute the strings and scratch the beat with your right hand in a up/down fashion, ups, and down are manipulated according to the rhythm, for example you might be scratching down/up/down/up/down/down. Actually, since I have been teaching my daughter,it has forced me to learn the fundamentals, so I can help her avoid the mistakes I made. She is 7, and if she keeps it up she may be another Juliette Valduriez.

The reason I brought all this up was because I know GMC's lessons work. I just wanted to know how people go about and practice them, what is the process they follow, like the one I illustrated above. The ones who score very high in their RECs I would love to hear more how you tackle a new lesson from start to finish.



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zoom
post Dec 13 2012, 07:54 AM
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I think there is alot that goes into becoming a great player and muso.

I think what your ear is hearing is right up there as most important. If your not hearing your bends are out of pitch your ear is not developed. Can you hear different pitches? Can you tell between major and minor?

I remember doing some rec's and both times I tried this piece I failed to pass. I couldn't really hear or see how to improve at the time.
A year later I'm playing better and I can hear a bit more it you know what I mean. Timing's better bends are more in tune etc.
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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 13 2012, 09:16 AM
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QUOTE (DarkWaveRiffer @ Dec 12 2012, 05:01 PM) *
This question is directed to Cosmin, but can be answered by anyone. I am working on Stacotto Power Chords, and It's pretty easy, but I am having issue playing with the backing track. I don't know how to sync it up. Its not something I have learned in my year of local instruction. So this leads me to my next question. I notice almost all exercises here have backing tracks. How do I practice with them? I have a GDEC 15 AMP, Guitar Pro 6, and a crappy laptop. I have a HD camcorder for recording.
I was hoping through analysis, I could develop a sound way to practice so I can make steady progress. It's amazing how some excel faster than others, you can attribute it to many things, time, skill, teacher,environment, but if we presume all things equal between two people,but give them different lessons, one will invariably standout, to a lesser, or greater degree. What I believe is it's the bridge lessons that make you better faster. A bridge lesson is a lesson just a little bit outside of your ability, but not so much where you either give up after a time of frustration, or you persevere, you finally get it, but in the mean time you could have learned 2-3 other bridge lessons, and been that much better.

My dilemma is finding those bridge lessons, and incorporating the right way to practice to gain the full benefit of that bridge lesson. The bridge lesson builds confidence in the young (young in playing time) guitarists playing to keep going, and not give up in frustration.I think eventually you reach a point in confidence that gives you momentum to keep going. Some people reach a level of skill where they are a decent guitarist, and don't push themselves much afterwards, and stop bridging. I feel like Mozart in my head, but a 1 year old trying to play stairway to heaven on guitar. One thing I think instructors do very well here is find those bridge lessons, go ahead and coin the phrase if you want. wink.gif

So people don't misunderstand me, I am simply trying to make the most of my lessons, and give people some food for thought. I feel like my confidence in guitar is wavering, and unless I do something to solidify, and build on it, I won't reach that momentum phase. So I realize its all in how I practice.

I look forward to your thoughts.


Hey mate smile.gif I noticed this one just now... Well, getting to use backing tracks and playing with confidence is usually a thing related to the rhythm and groove. This is a thing that tabs unfortunately can't take care of.

The thing lies in your hearing basically. Let's split things up like this:

- when you hear a song you like, you usually listen to it A LOT, right?
- listening to it A LOT, automatically makes you remember it
- if you can do this - usually - with a vocal line, why not do it with a guitar line or with a drum groove? It's all about listening and reproducing with your voice. Everything is slowed down, here at GMC, so that you can analyze and reproduce yourself. The catch here, is to be able to reproduce in respect to a tempo and a certain rhythmic form or groove.

Here's the process as I see it:

- start off with a simple lesson - a Bear Rose beginner lesson on shifting chords, would be the greatest and best example as it's easy to remember and play!

1) Listen to each part
2) Reproduce each part with your voice while tapping your foot against the floor (in 4ths usually) - you can use the metronome too
3) Pick up the guitar and learn left hand patterns and then the right hand strumming patterns
4) at the slowest tempo where things make sense, try and use your guitar instead of using your voice this time against the metronome

See what happens and remember - your ears will help out! Let's get back into your thread and I will give you a few easy lessons to work this skill out smile.gif Deal?

Cosmin


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DarkWaveRiffer
post Dec 13 2012, 05:41 PM
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QUOTE (Cosmin Lupu @ Dec 13 2012, 03:16 AM) *
Hey mate smile.gif I noticed this one just now... Well, getting to use backing tracks and playing with confidence is usually a thing related to the rhythm and groove. This is a thing that tabs unfortunately can't take care of.

The thing lies in your hearing basically. Let's split things up like this:

- when you hear a song you like, you usually listen to it A LOT, right?
- listening to it A LOT, automatically makes you remember it
- if you can do this - usually - with a vocal line, why not do it with a guitar line or with a drum groove? It's all about listening and reproducing with your voice. Everything is slowed down, here at GMC, so that you can analyze and reproduce yourself. The catch here, is to be able to reproduce in respect to a tempo and a certain rhythmic form or groove.

Here's the process as I see it:

- start off with a simple lesson - a Bear Rose beginner lesson on shifting chords, would be the greatest and best example as it's easy to remember and play!

1) Listen to each part
2) Reproduce each part with your voice while tapping your foot against the floor (in 4ths usually) - you can use the metronome too
3) Pick up the guitar and learn left hand patterns and then the right hand strumming patterns
4) at the slowest tempo where things make sense, try and use your guitar instead of using your voice this time against the metronome

See what happens and remember - your ears will help out! Let's get back into your thread and I will give you a few easy lessons to work this skill out smile.gif Deal?

Cosmin


Great info Cosmin, and everyone. I hope this info helps people, as much as it will help me. I am teaching my daughter Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer, and I have heard that song a zillion times, so the rhythm is automatic with me for that song. So I get what you are saying, if you can hum it in your head, This will go a long way in playing it with the correct rhythm. Thanks!


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Cosmin Lupu
post Dec 13 2012, 06:02 PM
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QUOTE (DarkWaveRiffer @ Dec 13 2012, 04:41 PM) *
Great info Cosmin, and everyone. I hope this info helps people, as much as it will help me. I am teaching my daughter Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer, and I have heard that song a zillion times, so the rhythm is automatic with me for that song. So I get what you are saying, if you can hum it in your head, This will go a long way in playing it with the correct rhythm. Thanks!


Haha! Good call buddy! You got a good example in your hands smile.gif Now pieces that are difficult will go a longer way, but the principle is the same wink.gif


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